FRIHOST FORUMS SEARCH FAQ TOS BLOGS COMPETITIONS
You are invited to Log in or Register a free Frihost Account!


So if I wanted to swap MoBos...





AdamantMonk
I could just do it? the HDD, PCI cards and drives would all still work, no effort required? Or is there more to it than that...

I have a feeling it's the latter (I mean like effort beyond unplugging and unscrewing stuff)

Basically what happened so no one jumps to conclusions is I bought a Comp from a LAN Center what is a little outdated. I'm not like, knowing what I'm doing... last game I beat on PC was either Sim-City or Doom 2.
zuk4u
Check on the producer's site if the new mobo will support your old parts (ata interface, agp support), if yes then there shouldn't be any problems with upgrading.
Maybe write here what parts do you have and what mobo you want to buy?
alkady
Actually you have to make sure the new motherboard supports all the parts which it most likely will if it's a recent board.

Plus you'd need to update the drivers if your using a component that isnt recognized.

Then your pratically done.
AdamantMonk
OK my current Mobo is an Abit IS7-V2 what uses the Intel 478-pin set. I'm looking into buying an ASUS P5ND2-SLI what uses the Intel LGA 775 setup.
psycosquirrel
You would have to get a new CPU if you wanted to get that motherboard. Also, you would have to get a new video card. So basically you would be making a completely new computer...
AdamantMonk
psycosquirrel wrote:
You would have to get a new CPU if you wanted to get that motherboard.


I know, or I wouldn't have written down the pin set bit.

Quote:
Also, you would have to get a new video card.


Can I ask why? just has to be SLI compatible or what? This one doesn't add up.
izcool
If you're happy with the case and components that you have in your current PC, then it you would have to almost disassemble your entire PC's insides to get the motherboard out. Some exceptions may be the optical, floppy, and hard disk drives, if they're not in the way.

If you're not happy, then I would just sit that computer aside and build one from a fresh and clean slate. You could always transfer your hard drive (which you will have to more than likely reformat, as Windows XP messes up as it detects it's a different machine) and other peripherals that you want to go inside the new PC.

The reason on why I say that is because the motherboard is screwed down to the case (more than likely, sometimes it's clips that are easier to remove), and with all that stuff in the way, it's near impossible to do.

The other peripherals should still work with the new motherboard (if they accept the same sort of connections, as sometimes they don't) provided that you didn't damage them when you took them out.

Best of luck to you.

- Mike.
TheGeek
Its always a good idea to uninstall all old drivers and install new ones again whenever you swap out a major piece like the mobo however. Usually as long as its mostly the same as the old motherboard with few minor differences it shouldnt be a problem. Windows XP is usually pretty good about finding new hardware when it boots up. Even if it is an entire new mobo it usually can figure it out.
Donutey
AdamantMonk wrote:
psycosquirrel wrote:
You would have to get a new CPU if you wanted to get that motherboard.


I know, or I wouldn't have written down the pin set bit.

Quote:
Also, you would have to get a new video card.


Can I ask why? just has to be SLI compatible or what? This one doesn't add up.


Your current motherboard is AGP 8x, while the one your looking at buying has a PCIe interface for the video card, SLI or not, you'd have to get a new card.
AdamantMonk
Donutey wrote:
Your current motherboard is AGP 8x, while the one your looking at buying has a PCIe interface for the video card, SLI or not, you'd have to get a new card.


Well at least someone explains it instead of just saying "Hey you HAVE to do it this way. Don't ask why." 'Tis all good though, the Graphics card is dated too.

You can run an OS without a Graphics card tho right? It's not as if my 360 won't sate me for a while in that neighborhood...



Basically what I'm getting right is if I uninstall the drivers for like the gfx and mobo before putting in the new mobo I'll be good, provided XP can stand the transfer.

But if XP can't I could reformat and reinstall XP and be all good again.

Right?
psycosquirrel
No, you have to have a graphics card so you have something to plug your monitor into.

Also, with the motherboard you chose, you would have to get a new processor like I said. The motherboard you chose has a completely different processor type than the one you have now.

Most likely, your windows install will stay intact if you do what you said, but it is very risky. I would not attempt it if you cannot reinstall. XP is very picky about hardware....


No offence, but you honestly do not know enough about computers to be building your own. You really should get someone you know that knows a lot to help you in person. There is only so much I can explain online...
AdamantMonk
I'm willing to bet there was a time in your life where you knew little about computers as well. Everyone has to start somewhere right?

I guess the internet is the wrong place to search for helpful people then... humble apologies.
izcool
Well, with me, it was mainly on my own. I ruined a few PC's by taking them apart and not knowing how to put them back together again.

A few years ago I really got brave and spent a lot of money and put my own PC together. It's actually the fastest PC that I own. Since I liked it a lot, I did it 2 more times. (They're slower systems than that one).

No, the Internet is not a bad place to look. You have to look at the right websites. I recommend you going to www.buildyourown.org.uk on building a PC, which I think should help you out with you changing your motherboard, as you're going to be essentially rebuilding your PC when you're doing it. And if someone on this thread said that your processor isn't going to work with the new motherboard, you should believe them, because computers are very picky about the parts that make them work. That was my huge mistake with the first PC that I built, because the processor I had (a Pentium 4 HT 2.4GHz CPU, with 800MHz FSB) did not work with the motherboard I bought. So I had to fish out more money and get another motherboard, PLUS memory chips for the motherboard too. I did eventually use the motherboard and memory that I had in another PC.

If you still think that the internet is a bad place to find more information about this topic, go into your local bookstore (I like Borders a lot over Barnes & Noble) and buy a book about building PC's. It'll go through the steps on what you need to do on how to mount the motherboard to the case (yes, there is a strict way on how you have to do it), and how it's recommended that you use a anti-static band when working on PC's, as you could be carraying static electricity and ruin expensive and sensitive parts.

Did I learn computers overnight ? Of course not. Do your research before you jump into such of a big thing, because you might wreck your parts. I learn new things about computers all the time because I buy a lot of computer books from thrift stores and from Borders, because that's what interests me.

I don't mean to sound like a pain in the neck about this, but that's all that I'm saying. I do appologize.

- Mike.
AdamantMonk
yeah no i was just kind of exaggarating... took a little offense even though psychosquirrel said not to...

The main reason i want a new mobo is so it can fit the more current LGA 775 type chip anyways. so clearly i know the chips aren't universal.

of course then i didn't know graphics cards weren't universal and assumed (this is from looking at the back of dells and stuff) that the monitor connection is sometimes on the mobo...

i just dont get why people gotta say "if you're getting a new mobo just get all the parts, you'll have to get the graphics card and chip anyways" it seems like a matter of opinion on if the other old parts would still be relevant... though no one seemed to mention i'd need likely a better power supply considering i'd be running an sli mobo.
izcool
Well, I'm glad that you realize that a PC is a complicated piece of machinery and works like a puzzle when you try to put one together. Although a lot of things are standardized nowadays (some manufacturers like Dell make up their own screw holes on their motherboards, what a pain that can be), you have to be careful when you look at specifications.

He was only saying that so that you know, if you didn't realize it before. Instead of you buying that motherboard and expecting it to work right away, he's pointing out that there's more than what meets the eye. That's all we're trying to do. We're only pointing out (what seems to be) the obvious - "Hey, that video card of your's won't work with that new motherboard, you'll have to fork over another $100.00 (or so) to get the right one".

- Mike.
psycosquirrel
Exactly, I was trying to say there is more than meets the eye here. Oh, and when I knew little about computers was before Windows.


To get to where I am with computers:

Start at age 3 where your dad works as an IT specialist.

Ruin the OS install on every computer in the house several times before the age of 6...

Learn how to install Windows by the age of 9.

Build first computer by age 11.

Continue to learn until high school...

Take every computer class at your high school, every programming class, and every electronics class. I took at least one computer class every semester for all of high school (4 classes per semester on block scheduling). At the same time, repair tons of computers and help hundreds over the phone and through forums.

Get hired at Georgia Institute of Technology to work in the IT department. Work there for a few months... Did I forget I am only 18?


So I have had far more experience than anyone I know. I have worked hard to get to know as much as I do, and I am telling you that it is IMPOSSIBLE to just learn how to build a computer really fast. You should not expect us to have the time to hold your hand and pull you through everything you need to do with a computer online... I do not mind helping people, but when you act like I am being rude, it is slightly offensive. I am trying to help you, as with everyone else on here.



Now back on topic:

My experience with LGA775 is bad. Of the 4 systems I have worked with at work, I have recieved dead CPUs and Mobos like crazy. One system in particular took 4 DOA mobos for us to decide to screw it and go AMD. Another system's processor was DOA-- the FIRST DOA processor I have ever seen. LGA775 is crap, go 939, AM2, or just wait for Conroe.
izcool
I started with a really old Dell Latitude CP laptop around the year 2000 (P1 166MHz I think it was, somehow we got Windows 2000 on it).

I got into the system files (like the WINDOWS, SYSTEM, and SYSTEM32 folders) and deleted them thinking I was "taking out the trash" of "useless files that I had no idea what they were". Sure enough, when I rebooted, the laptop wouldn't start up again. I had to give it away since I had no idea how to FDISK a hard drive or install Windows. I've gotten so much better since then. I gave that laptop away to someone else who found out how to reformat that. One PC (just one desktop) multiplied and split into multiple PC's, which is sorta where I am now. When I was just with one machine I learned a lot about programming websites and now I've sorta gotten away from that (knock on wood since I just started a new website, I'm getting back at it a little) into PC hardware instead of with software stuff. Anyway I think I've done enough in this thread, good luck to you with your project.

- Mike.
AdamantMonk
psycosquirrel wrote:

So I have had far more experience than anyone I know. I have worked hard to get to know as much as I do, and I am telling you that it is IMPOSSIBLE to just learn how to build a computer really fast. You should not expect us to have the time to hold your hand and pull you through everything you need to do with a computer online... I do not mind helping people, but when you act like I am being rude, it is slightly offensive. I am trying to help you, as with everyone else on here.

Now back on topic:

My experience with LGA775 is bad. Of the 4 systems I have worked with at work, I have recieved dead CPUs and Mobos like crazy. One system in particular took 4 DOA mobos for us to decide to screw it and go AMD. Another system's processor was DOA-- the FIRST DOA processor I have ever seen. LGA775 is crap, go 939, AM2, or just wait for Conroe.


OK sorry for acting like you were being rude, you seemed to be under the impression that I was asking for an assist throughout the entire computer building process. I wasn't.

I have no problem with learning this stuff on my own, I just figured I'd get some facts straight more to know what I was in for, rather than someone putting down a complete tutorial or something. Sorry I didn't make that bit clear, as you seem to get a little irritated thinking I was putting my full dependence on people like you.

Now on the actual topic:

I'm partial to Intel, but I'll do some looking into AMD.

Which I guess is ok as I've chosen to just build a new comp, instead of upgrading. I also have learned alot about part compatibility over this last month, believe it or not.
psycosquirrel
GSorry you got insulted by my first post in this topic, I always have good intentions Laughing

I am glad to see you have decided to build a new computer. But you can still use many of the parts from your old PC, which will make things much cheaper. The PSU, case, and drives can be re-used. To build a decent gaming PC, I would estimate you would have to spend only $400 or so.

As for Intel vs AMD, Intel's 805D chip is CHEAP and very fast. It is a dual core for under $150, I have seen it as low as $110. I would reccommend it for any budget system. Unfortunately, it is LGA775. If you really want to make a good gaming machine, AMD is the way to go. While Pentiums seem much better because of the higher frequencies, there is more to processing than frequencies. My AMD Opteron 146 only runs at 2.0Ghz, but it totally dominates most 3.0+Ghz single core Pentiums that cost much more. I used to be a total Intel fanboy, but my new processor has made me neutral. I like whichever is best Laughing
Related topics
Need For Speed Most Wanted
Need for Speed Most Wanted
My Signatures
NF HP2 Most Wanted
The Secret Source of Google's Power
Need for Speed Most Wanted Demo
So, I just discovered emulators and ROMS
Need For Speed:Most Wanted
Please help. I have a problem with installing FreeBSD
My Need For Spees Most Wanted pics.
NFS: Most Wanted
Need For Speed Most Wanted
Ever wanted it to go a certain way?
Programs in RAM
Reply to topic    Frihost Forum Index -> Computers -> Hardware and Electronics

FRIHOST HOME | FAQ | TOS | ABOUT US | CONTACT US | SITE MAP
© 2005-2011 Frihost, forums powered by phpBB.