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photography





edallica
hi folks!

i was looking at getting into photography but i would really like a good intorduction. its really hrad to find one on the web...does anyone know ehere any are?

im looking at finding out about things like what values of ISO to use and in what situation and how to use the appature etc.

any help would be great,

cheers!
nikolic
I am a professional photographer.

You are right. There is a lot to learn if you want to know the technology well.

However, it's my view that this isn't totaly neccessary. Instead, shoot a lot and learn your tools well enough so they don't get in the way of what you want to see in the world or say to the world. It is more important to think about what is important to you as an individual then to know every technical detail there is to an imager or studio lighting. Should you decide to ever go pro, this is what assistants are for... Wink

An ISO is a standard of light that corresponds to the photosynthetic chemical properties of film. They only corresponded to this in the first place, but ISO is ultimately how sensitive a digital imager within a camera will act.

The higher the ISO, the more sensitive the imager will act. Like film.

The part of film that "sees" is actually an emulsion (a semi-liquid that is really good at holding things other than itself in susupension) that has silver particles that oxodize when exposed to light. ISO numbers correspond to the size of the silver particles. When hit with light, the very small particles go completely black. So the larger the particle, the less light is needed to make it trigger, and the less light is needed to make the image as a whole. The flip-side, however, is that there is more visible grain to a larger ISO in film.

In digital photography, ISO really corresponds to this behavior. So the higher the ISO setting, the more sensitive the imager (the replacement for film) is made to less light. However, the compromise is that the higher the ISO, the lower the quality with more digital artifacts and less exact color.

Generally, a good all around ISO setting is 400 for use with all outdoor lighting and much indoor lighting, and still get good managable exposure speeds. I personaly shoot 100 for most instances, but will push to 1600 or 3200 when shooting at night, for instance. However, I know that any image taken at these ISO settings will require work in Photoshop to clean up the color and tone.

There are other measures of light that are often used.

In digital photography, the Kelvin scale (this is celcius, but starts at absolute zero rather than the freezing point) is used to detirmine the correct white point in an image. This is because materials (actually, a theoretical black-body radiator) burn with a different color range at different temperatures.

A candle will emit a set possible color range and the sun another (The range is 500 to 1000 for a candle and 5400 to 13000 for the sun.)

http://www.tvtechnology.com/features/Tech-Corner/f-rh-white.shtml

A lot of stuff, but really you should just be aware that you can set the white point for any image in a camera. Either generally, or exactly by setting a custom white point. Consult the manual of your digital camera to find out how to do this. It will provide the best dynamic light range for any particular scene and takes just 30 seconds to do.

Beyond this, take a trip to your local library, as they will invariably have ample resources to learn from. I go to mine regularly. It makes my knowledge of the subject more keen. Period.
Guyon
I have a full degree in photography and have also worked in that field. It is not easy and I do suggest you get a formal education before showing your work. If you get a reputation for poor quality pictures that may close a door to you in the future. There is so much more to it then pointing a camera and shooting.

ISO is very dependant on what you are shooting, the lighting conditions, and medium (color or black and white). While digital is very big now, I highly recommend that you learn with film. Learning to master your medium will transfer in to learning how to make quality shots.

A good start is heading off to your local museum and looking at quality Black and white. Look to see detail in in both shadows and highlights. That is not accident, they shot to get them. It is called zone system and a very valuable class to take in understanding how things work.

Books are good too, but noting beats a good instructor that can guide you in the learning process. With out a real call you might think you have a good shot , till they point out the flaws. That is part of growing. Leaing how to make the impossable perfect picture.

The other thing you will want to decide is what type of photography you want to do. the different type are like night and day. Model photographers are not like studio, industrial, or nature, to name a few. Specialization will give you the final edge to compete. Photographers are a dime a dozen. Great ones are the one that get the job.

I wish you lots of luck in that adventure and write back when you are looking for a camera. That is another big topic. Smile
Motoracer380
i just made a fresh post with my photos.. its realkly a natural thing.. timing is everything.. and you just need to find good angles..
time_ar
I love photographying too. I've been taking pictures for about 4 years. Not much experience but I think I can answer a few of you questions.

To begin with, it is necessary to understand what ISO does and how appature works. ISO basically is a sensitivity of the film, for example, ISO100, ISO200, ISO400, and ISO800. High value means high sensitivity. However it is not achieved without a cost, i.e., high sensitivity also gives you more grains which make your pictures look noisy.

You may need high sensitivity films in low light situation or in sport photographing which demands a high shutter speed. For some situation, sensitivity can be reduced by allowing more light into the shutter. Here comes aperture. Aperture usually comes with the lense. Small value means large aperture (almost more money Smile). By selecting large aperture you can allow more light into your camera. This gives you certain adventages (although sometimes can be dissadvantages as well) like using a low sensitivity film for less noisy pictures, using a faster shutter speed, etc. Moreover, an important property of your pictures, called Depth of Field, is also determined by aperture.

Hope this help.

GL!



edallica wrote:
hi folks!

i was looking at getting into photography but i would really like a good intorduction. its really hrad to find one on the web...does anyone know ehere any are?

im looking at finding out about things like what values of ISO to use and in what situation and how to use the appature etc.

any help would be great,

cheers!
immoralist
Whilst it is really important to get to grips with the techniques involved in film photography, it is important to develop the "artistic" side as well (composition etc.). My advice is to start with a reasonable digitial camera and just take as many shots as possible of anything. Get a notebook and write a diary of your work, what works and what doesn't. Save the best, trash the rest (being digital this process isn't costing too much money). Once you have really discovered your own style and eye, then go out and get into film. I use medium and large format myself and, in the modern age, would suggest skipping 35mm altogether.

To sum up. I've spent many years with cameras of all sorts and there is no substitute for hard graft. I wish there had been digicams when I was learning as it would have made things much cheaper to learn. If you can take a good shot then you've cracked it - all the technical knowledge in the world can't make a bad photo good.

P.S. Try odd stuff like very long low light exposures onto slide film and then cross process them. Whatever you learn, see what happens when you ignore the rules.
varun_dodla
that was real good intro on photography and being a photograohy enthusiast cant refrain from thanking you all out there.

thnx a lot everyone for those quality posts.
megastar
nikolic wrote:
I am a professional photographer.

You are right. There is a lot to learn if you want to know the technology well.

However, it's my view that this isn't totaly neccessary. Instead, shoot a lot and learn your tools well enough so they don't get in the way of what you want to see in the world or say to the world. It is more important to think about what is important to you as an individual then to know every technical detail there is to an imager or studio lighting. Should you decide to ever go pro, this is what assistants are for... Wink

An ISO is a standard of light that corresponds to the photosynthetic chemical properties of film. They only corresponded to this in the first place, but ISO is ultimately how sensitive a digital imager within a camera will act.

The higher the ISO, the more sensitive the imager will act. Like film.

The part of film that "sees" is actually an emulsion (a semi-liquid that is really good at holding things other than itself in susupension) that has silver particles that oxodize when exposed to light. ISO numbers correspond to the size of the silver particles. When hit with light, the very small particles go completely black. So the larger the particle, the less light is needed to make it trigger, and the less light is needed to make the image as a whole. The flip-side, however, is that there is more visible grain to a larger ISO in film.

In digital photography, ISO really corresponds to this behavior. So the higher the ISO setting, the more sensitive the imager (the replacement for film) is made to less light. However, the compromise is that the higher the ISO, the lower the quality with more digital artifacts and less exact color.

Generally, a good all around ISO setting is 400 for use with all outdoor lighting and much indoor lighting, and still get good managable exposure speeds. I personaly shoot 100 for most instances, but will push to 1600 or 3200 when shooting at night, for instance. However, I know that any image taken at these ISO settings will require work in Photoshop to clean up the color and tone.

There are other measures of light that are often used.

In digital photography, the Kelvin scale (this is celcius, but starts at absolute zero rather than the freezing point) is used to detirmine the correct white point in an image. This is because materials (actually, a theoretical black-body radiator) burn with a different color range at different temperatures.

A candle will emit a set possible color range and the sun another (The range is 500 to 1000 for a candle and 5400 to 13000 for the sun.)

http://www.tvtechnology.com/features/Tech-Corner/f-rh-white.shtml

A lot of stuff, but really you should just be aware that you can set the white point for any image in a camera. Either generally, or exactly by setting a custom white point. Consult the manual of your digital camera to find out how to do this. It will provide the best dynamic light range for any particular scene and takes just 30 seconds to do.

Beyond this, take a trip to your local library, as they will invariably have ample resources to learn from. I go to mine regularly. It makes my knowledge of the subject more keen. Period.


excellent description

any way if you wanna see professional photgraphs there are many sites offering them and you can ask questions what did the photgrapher used to take that particulat shot

the website having pro photographs which i know is www.fotothing.com
sentinela
i'm also into photography!!!

but as you just don't have the slightiest clue how to take de best pics....
jarcelao
I do love photography! In fact, I'm crazy with it!

Just got my first DSLR last December and am currently very happy and exploring the vast world of photography. Smile
FreakyCoderz
Well.... its been a while I have'nt touch the camera. Well I been into photography those days....

With a bulky 'mechanical' camera with me.
Those days, my passion is to GET into the real 'painting with light'. I use a manual camera. It is a SLR (Single Lens Reflex; Olympus OM-1n) and I will adjust the aperture and shutter speed manually.

What a task! The best thing is that you will definately knows what you're doing. What's the most exact combinations of shutter speed and aperture opening. Not to mention some special thing (+) and (-) to dealt with exposure effects.

Most of my camera is by the brand name Olympus.
I've got OM-1n, The Pen Ft (1/2 frame; a 36 exposure will have 72exposure!) and nowadays I got the Camedia C804L, mju II and a C350zoom digitall.

Anyway I do enjoy the 'mechanical' years.... arming myself with a lunasix gossen light meters aroung the nature (Hey!!! I like nature photo!)
songsalways
One of my latest hobbies have been photography. I love to take pictures with manual cameras, with those settings like aperture, shutter speed, dof etc to be manipulated manually.

I m not a professional photographer, and i am not so confident while taking pictures and cant expect the real pictures to turn out as my expectations. But I have tried a good deal in it.
I have an old Zenit camera with me. It consumes the battery too much.

But its ok. I use it for my photographical appetite. For other regular stuffs, i use digi cams.
moniker
try not to follow the new craze of point and click, there is something to be said about photography where the photographer actually sets up what they are taking. i make sculptures out of books, and have found that macro photographs of details of each peice work better than the actual sculptures. don't feel you have to go out and find the good shots, a lot of them are just waiting to be seen at home.
adhoc
I don't consider myself into photography or anything, but I bought a Canon A540 the other day and it's been a lot of fun. Yesterday I found one of our cats sleeping in the closet, and because it was dark I couldn't get a decent picture without using the flash.. And I absolutely hate the flash. (Whoever thought of that? It makes everything look incredibly unnatural in 9 cases out of 10.) So I figured out that I could up the shutter speed to 10 seconds to get a lot of light in there; I just had to put the camera on a chair to get keep it steady. It's great fun. Smile

I'm going to Alanya, Turkey this Saturday and I want to get some good shots of the beaches-sea, mountains-nature, and castles-ruins there. Any quick tips from the pros?

Well.. seeing as there are pros here.. What's the point of the flash? Is it ever any good?
xposeit
i just love photography.i love taking pictures at just about anything.i expecially love taking pics of myself.lol Smile
FreakyCoderz
adhoc,
next time use a TRIPOD instead of the chair. You'll be better in contol with a tripod.

I am too.... the one s that don't like to use the flash but after quite sometimes you have to make use of the flash.

My scope of photography is landscape, nature, abstract and macro BUT this is WAAAYYY back 15-20 years ago.

Nowadays I make use to photograph kids, family photo using the digital camera point n shoot.

Maybe later on will try the OLD TIME FAV; the mechanical camera. Rolling Eyes
Liu
I do some amateur photography as a side hobby. I started out with the book "Teach Yourself Photography" by Frost. It's a real beginner book to get you started.
alexjbarrett
I've been taking photos now for a few years now and although my pictures have come on leaps and bounds, they still have a long way to go. It may help if I get a camera with an interchangeable lens at some point.
In my experience, it’s not one of those things to rush into, .i.e. don’t expect to learn everything over night, or even in the next few weeks, a lot of trial and error is needed.
Hope this helps a bit.
alexjbarrett
To add to the above, you could try to join a photography in your area (Have a quick google to find your closest one) as these are a mine of information, where more experienced members will be able to pass onto to you their years of experience fat quicker than any magazine, book or website could.
Most of all, practice, practice practice.
oais
I love photography. Just need the proper tools, I don't have an SLR. Sad
I just have a small point and click camera with no pro settings in it. I want to learn the functions and techniques to adjust aperture size, shutter speed, white balance, and ISO. Hopefully someday I'll understand them.
Liu
I forgot to add on to the flash statements... but it's best to get an external flash, and bounce it off against something like the ceiling, or you can add a softbox.
girlcalledjay
Hi!

I have just ready your post...and while it is now three weeks old, I am replying in the hope that you might still be reading!

I work as a photographer so can totally understand your interest. There is NOTHING better than finding a really great shot. Don't worry too much at first if your camera isn't the best on the market...we all started somewhere.

THe best advice I can give you is to take photos everyday. Take your camera with you as often as possible and be ready when you see something awesome. Before long you will start to see what kind of photos you really love to take. Landscapes, abstract images, candid portraits...and the list goes on!

Also join your local camera club. There are thousands out there and you can learn from people with real passion for what they do and often many years of experience.

There are plenty of sites on the WWW that you can look into too. One I like (and I hope it's okay to post the address here) is www.passionforpixels.com. It's a site with lot's of members, hints and tips and galleries for experienced and beginning photographers. You can post your photos there and get really useful feedback on improving your work. No nasty criticism, always constructive!!

Happy snapping Smile
giovanni
I know that some of you, professional photographers will want to kill me. My opinion is that an excellent way to start shooting is using a digital camera; no even an SLR, but any able to take pictures. I have been an amateur photographer for several years. I have had tons of cameras, and now I'm convinced of that the best camera the one that delivers more fun to you. I love film photography, but digital lets you keep shooting again and again, until you reach de desired result. I consider that before learning about apertures and speeds, you have to love the photography, and the easiest way to do that, is taking photos.
[/quote]
paul_indo
You're right giovanni.

The best way to start is to get a camera and start taking photos. A good compact digital is perfectly adequate for an amateur.
IMHO Fuji F30 is about the best value but only just rela\eased and hard to get for another week or two.

If you enjoy taking photos then go and buy a good book on photography.
Petersen's Big Book of Photography used to be the photographic Bible. I still have a copy I bought in the early 80's and it is still valid in most areas, although it obviously doesn't specificaly cover digital. If it is still published I'm sure a new edition will cover digital photography also.
jarcelao
Got a Nikon D50 here and am very happy with it. I love photography but haven't got much time to shoot because people here in Saudi Arabia doesn't like photography. They are too old fashioned to be involved in photography. Damn! Hope I could go home to my native place(Philippines) and enjoy photography to the max! Smile
sugarbox
i like the suggestions here Very Happy
m00tmuffin
Ditto on what's been said above me--a nice digital camera will help get you started and just go wild with picture taking at first to get a feel, if it does something for you then keep on doing it. Smile There are tons of online tutorials/communities/various other resources and books if it really has sparked your interest. Might wanna also check out the photography section on deviantart.com and flip through some of what you like, it might give you some ideas as there are some really talented people on there. Smile
palavra
i am an amateur!
because the more you be professional ,the more money you spend.
Studio Madcrow
palavra wrote:
i am an amateur!
because the more you be professional ,the more money you spend.


Of course, being a professional assumes that you're MAKING money from photography. You don't just sped. You may have to buy a new carea every few years, but a true pro makes enough money taking pictures that it just come out of profits a little.

Really, the difference between amateur and pro isn't what camera you have, but rather how you use your camera...
urbanbuddha
I love photography, but I am such an amateur! And my camera is kinda crap... I would love a digital SLR. *drool* My subject matter is usually my asian ball-jointed-doll:



Most of my work goes here: http://www.bunnywink.tk
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