FRIHOSTFORUMSSEARCHFAQTOSBLOGSCOMPETITIONS
You are invited to Log in or Register a free Frihost Account!


any musicians out there..?





molif
Hey..

sometimes, i hate listening to big bands songs coz too commercialised..

however, i love to go to pure volume website to check out unknown band doin their thing which sounds cool.. but some sounds awful too...
Artelis
I know what you mean with them being over commercialized. It just turns me off from the music. I still enjoy some popular bands though (Muse, Broken Social Scene, Death Cab for Cutie, etc). Being a recording artist, it pains me to listen to some of these garage bands, though. I know what a start up home project has the potential to sound like, and it is much better than this (recording quality, that is).
woja
I dislike the commercialisation of music, but we have to regard this as a distraction rather than anything inherantly wrong with the music itself. I personally avoid the gossip mongers, hyperbole merchants and the popular music press and concentrate solely on the music itself. Adopting the attitude that the music must be bad if it has been commercialised is as bad as saying that only sucessful, commercialised music is good. Keep your ears open and don't be a music snob of any sort (especially with regards to genre: for years I avoided country music because I thought all of it was horrendous; recently I've discovered some gems).
Remember: there are only two types of music, good and bad. Don't judge it by its cover (or posters or press coverage), just listen to it. Be prepared to be surprised when your expectations are confounded.
digitaleyes
I make tunes purely on the PC with programs like CuBase, Logic, Reason, Fruity Loops...mainly Techno, Breaks, Drum'n'Bass. Some people say that there is no skill in making computer music, but I disagree and think it involves skill,a good ear, rythmn etc. What do you reckon?
Subsonic Sound
There is a skill to computer music, yes. It's a different skill, and more often than not the real skill is making something unique, something that stands out. Any monkey with 5 minutes training could make a beat. The real trick is making a good beat. Smile

I make quite a lot of music on Reason 3.0 (doing it right now, actually, for a piece of compositional coursework) but primarily I'm a bassist.
Scott
I do a lot of electronic music using Reason and Ableton live. And yeah< I agree, the skill involved isn't just making a beat, the skill is making something unique and good sounding. I like to record some guitar for my tracks, I like rock music a lot too.

pcrecord
I don't know any drummer who likes electronic music. Of course we don't get to play on those records..

For me music is an art, any meens to get there is good... If some people like what you do, you're on the right track... But I like to hear living music...

I'm a drummer by the way Wink
And I lie to play live ! Like a drug to me...
Artelis
pcrecord wrote:
I don't know any drummer who likes electronic music. Of course we don't get to play on those records..

For me music is an art, any meens to get there is good... If some people like what you do, you're on the right track... But I like to hear living music...

I'm a drummer by the way Wink
And I lie to play live ! Like a drug to me...


Drummer.......Electronic Musician. UH OH! Caught ya! Haha. I'm a groove set drummer and a marching snare drummer, hah. I've been drumming for about ten years now and am still loving it. Of course I'm a pianist and a trumpet player, too Wink

I use cubase and reason! Nothing like writing a good chillaxing piece for some softsynths and sampled drums Cool

Oh yeah.. Drummers get on electronic sets a lot. Electronic drums. I feel like I have wayy more freedom and creativity on an electronic drum kit than on a drum machine. You can do a lot of electronic sounding stuff with the feel of drum sticks in your hand Wink It's like playing on a bunch of realfeels. Fun stuff. Just another style of playing.
Psynthax
I am allso a producer myself, I have a mini studio in my house Smile

I use Cubase with a lot of virtual instruments and roland jp-8000 ( keyboard synth ). In the future I hope to expand my studio further.

My girlfriend will maybe go to Royal Academy of Music so we plan to create music thogether Cool

I am into Psychedelic Trance and Psychedelic Chillout, that suites me the best Smile
Dean_The_Great
I've cut a few tracks on a program called Garage Band, and the computer on which I made them was connected to a large Yamaha MIDI-Compatable Keyboard, which was in turn hooked up to an M-Box (Audio connector box) and a small sound board.

Garage Band is great because it allows you to use a combination of MIDI and Audio, and it has great Graphic EQ's and such. The audio doesn't give you nearly as much freedom as Reason, but it allows for the composition of songs to be made really easily. Also, with many of the factory presets built in, it is not difficult to mic my guitar and throw that into the mix as well.
molif
wow.....

inspiring man.. great technics of making music..
erik
I hate commercialised music,

I like bands no one knows, like:
Smogus (NL)
Ambiossis (NL)
Dreadlock Pussy (NL)
Zen (IT)
Guilty Method (IT)
The Blackout (UK)

Say it when you know some of these bands!
molif
hahaha... never heard of those bands before... ENGLISH singing band..? or other languages..?
Insanity
I don't really care if they're commercialized or whatnot, just if their music sounds good. I know it sucks to see them milk so much out of the music industry, but in the end its really all about the music, after all.
immoralist
There is only good music and bad music. If it is played live or by a computer is pretty irrelevant. While I'm a big fan of more
Quote:
Live
acts like Funkadelic, I also think Kraftwerk have made some of the most moving music ever.

I don't think the novel suffered by the introduction of the word processor, and I don't think music will decline because technology has made its creation less dependant on good hand co-ordination. Seek out and enjoy good music (and make some if you can), avoid bad music.
SunburnedCactus
immoralist wrote:
There is only good music and bad music.


Now there's an enormous generalisation. There are only opinions on whether music is good or bad, it is an entirely subjective matter.

Quote:
...I don't think music will decline because technology has made its creation less dependant on good hand co-ordination.


I like to entertain the thought that there may be more to musical talent than just "good hand co-ordination". Surely?
erik
molif wrote:
hahaha... never heard of those bands before... ENGLISH singing band..? or other languages..?

jup, exept:
Zen - Chi Scorda Chi
Dreadlock Pussy - Akemi
Guilty Method - Ink
Subsonic Sound
What annoys me, actually, is when people go out of their way to be uncommercial, to avoid the mainstream. Commercial success does not turn good music into bad. Just occasionally, the mainstream does get it right.

It becomes a status thing to be into the most obscure bands... and to keep them obscure, it almost becomes a status thing to be into the most unlistenable bands.

I've shown someone a band, and they loved it. A few months later, the band became a big hit, and suddenly this person was attacking them loudly to whoever would listen.

That's not to say there's not a lot of over-produced, commercially generated music in the charts. Because there is. Loads. But people who take pride in being into bands no-one else has heard of, and automatically shun any band who ever actually sell an album... that's just sad.
molif
hmm... quite true.. commercialised music.. either bad or good, doesnt matter.. up for the individual to show their sense of appreciation..
Ofinet
I agree with above guy, it's up to the people...no amount of advertising can make you like a really really sucky band...

And besides, most of the people I know, me included, base their band tastes on self-discovery missions, I generally will hate any band that someone tells me is cool, and it will take a while to grow on me if they are actually that good.

More to the topic, I like searching for my favourite groups\artists on Amazon and then looking at the "If you liked....then you might like...." section. It's pretty nifty in terms of looking for what's out there.

Even better, although bandwith eating, www.pandora.com...shows you your favourite music you've never heard....or something along those lines

Even more to topic, yes i am a musician...strangely enough, I wanna be commercialised...not prostituted, but appreciated... Razz
molif
but it requires determination to achieve that area of music business.. itz not easy being a recording artist/musician.. at that point, making music is not the onli thing to worry about.. but the business, the media, the fans.. gosh.. the fans.. the greatest assets.. the fans..
taurus_just4u
With the explosive growth of computers music technology and consequent reduction in the cost of equipment in the late 1990s, the number of artists and DJs working within electronic music is overwhelming. With the advent of hard disk recording systems, it is possible for any home computer user to become a musician, and hence the rise in the number of "bedroom bands", often consisting of a single person. Nevertheless notable artists can still be identified. Within the experimental and classical or "art" traditions still working today are Karlheinz Stockhausen, Pierre Boulez and Steve Reich. The genre of ambient electronic music was formed at the turn of the 1970s in Germany by Popol Vuh, Klaus Schulze and Tangerine Dream. Influential musicians in industrial and later synth pop styles include Throbbing Gristle, Cabaret Voltaire (both now defunct), the Human League and Kraftwerk who released their first album in over a decade in 2003. In house, techno and drum and bass pioneers such as Juan Atkins, Derrick May, Goldie, A Guy Called Gerald and LTJ Bukem are still active as of 2003. Commercially successful artists working under the "electronica" rubric such as Fatboy Slim, Faithless, Fluke, The Chemical Brothers, Daft Punk, The Crystal Method, Massive Attack, The Prodigy, Orbital, Propellerheads, Underworld, Überzone, Björk and Moby continue to release albums and perform regularly (sometimes in stadium-sized arenas, such has the popularity of electronic dance music grown). Some DJs such as Paul Oakenfold, John Digweed, Paul van Dyk, Armin van Buuren, and Tijs Verwest (aka Tiësto) have reached true superstar status and can command five-figure salaries for a single performance. They perform for hours on end mixing their music into pre-recorded singles. Some DJs have world wide Radio, and internet, broadcasted shows that air weekly. Such as A State Of Trance, a show mixed by Armin van Buuren. The critically acclaimed Autechre and Aphex Twin continue to put out challenging records of (mostly) home-listening music. On a more popular scale, Michael Jackson used to be heavily engaged in creating unique timbres, many of which were created electronically
taurus_just4u
With the explosive growth of computers music technology and consequent reduction in the cost of equipment in the late 1990s, the number of artists and DJs working within electronic music is overwhelming. With the advent of hard disk recording systems, it is possible for any home computer user to become a musician, and hence the rise in the number of "bedroom bands", often consisting of a single person. Nevertheless notable artists can still be identified. Within the experimental and classical or "art" traditions still working today are Karlheinz Stockhausen, Pierre Boulez and Steve Reich. The genre of ambient electronic music was formed at the turn of the 1970s in Germany by Popol Vuh, Klaus Schulze and Tangerine Dream. Influential musicians in industrial and later synth pop styles include Throbbing Gristle, Cabaret Voltaire (both now defunct), the Human League and Kraftwerk who released their first album in over a decade in 2003. In house, techno and drum and bass pioneers such as Juan Atkins, Derrick May, Goldie, A Guy Called Gerald and LTJ Bukem are still active as of 2003. Commercially successful artists working under the "electronica" rubric such as Fatboy Slim, Faithless, Fluke, The Chemical Brothers, Daft Punk, The Crystal Method, Massive Attack, The Prodigy, Orbital, Propellerheads, Underworld, Überzone, Björk and Moby continue to release albums and perform regularly (sometimes in stadium-sized arenas, such has the popularity of electronic dance music grown). Some DJs such as Paul Oakenfold, John Digweed, Paul van Dyk, Armin van Buuren, and Tijs Verwest (aka Tiësto) have reached true superstar status and can command five-figure salaries for a single performance. They perform for hours on end mixing their music into pre-recorded singles. Some DJs have world wide Radio, and internet, broadcasted shows that air weekly. Such as A State Of Trance, a show mixed by Armin van Buuren. The critically acclaimed Autechre and Aphex Twin continue to put out challenging records of (mostly) home-listening music. On a more popular scale, Michael Jackson used to be heavily engaged in creating unique timbres, many of which were created electronically
Subsonic Sound
Congratulations, you have successfully copied a Wikipedia entry. Twice.
Artelis
Subsonic Sound wrote:
Congratulations, you have successfully copied a Wikipedia entry. Twice.


Ouch, burn! Haha.

I'm a studen at Berklee right now, and let me tell you, there is a lot more to music production than making a good beat Laughing I'd say there is just as much practice time with production as there is with any acoustic instrument. I've been playing the piano for 15 years and the drums for 10 years, so I know a bit about practice Wink
Nick87
Every music that's been put out has been put out to be sold, so everything ever released on CD or vinyl or whatever is commercial.
That being said. I think you certainly need some skill to make something like kraftwerk does, or steve reich for example, but to take an old classic and turn it into a dance song, that has nothing to do with creativity. That is wanting to earn some easy money.
Subsonic Sound
Depends, actually. Sometimes it's barely different except for an added beat. Other times you can barely recognise it. Take 'Praise You' by Fatboy Slim, for example.
molif
very true.. depends.. haha.. different ppl got different music taste..
ralphbefree
I wish there was a way that we could take the commercialization out of music. It is the one thing that we can create with no other resources and vastly affect a large group of people. This is what "The Man" fears it and why there is so much commercialism.
Quote:
Keep On Rock'n
molif
well, your wish will take a miracle to happen though.. coz, there will be still commercialisation.. haha..
gabway
Does it really matters ? I mean, as long as you are having fun playing/composing music that you care for on your instrument/computer and making a decent living out of it, what would you want more ?
Related topics
Are there any musicians from Clemson, SC.
Any Musicians Out There?!
My Top Ten Musicians!!
Left handed musicians?
[OFFICIAL] Do you play an instrument?
any rockabilly musicians here?
The Independent Musicians Web
Building a site for my music. Any suggestions?
Do you know any german Singers ?
Progresive Metal
US Supreme Court rules against file swapping
favorite lead singers
REAL music
Are You A Musician?, If so, what do you play?
Reply to topic    Frihost Forum Index -> Sports and Entertainment -> Music

FRIHOST HOME | FAQ | TOS | ABOUT US | CONTACT US | SITE MAP
© 2005-2011 Frihost, forums powered by phpBB.