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The Great Gatsby





fotanez
How do you all feel about this book? The Roaring 20's was the time of Prohibition and development of materialism in America. Fitzgerald shows us this through his wonderful and compelling masterpiece.
TurkishGamer
I heard from somewhere (I don't remember where) that this was a good book. When I finished the book I relaized that nothing was good about it.I have no clue why.
dfreeman616
I have to agree with TurkishGamer. I didn't find Gatsby to be of any particular value. I couldn't relate to any of the characters, they lacked a character of life to them. Furthermore, it was just plain boring.
lycadia
It wasn't as bad as it might have been, but I certianly don't see why it is so often ranked among the "great works of literature. The plot doesn't seem well paced, the characters are not well-developed or particularly likable or interesting. Aside from the amusing tidbit that some critics make sketchily supported assumptions that there might be a homosexual subtext which did add some interest to reading it, it was simply a doring disappointment. Obviously, some people appreciate it more fully then I do, because it as my Lit teacher, who was otherwise a wise man who's judgement I usually agreed with. Whatever it is about this book that is great, missed me completely though.
Still, it was better than Death of a Salesman.
lyddi8
I have to disagree with the above three posts- The Great Gatsby is one of by favourite novels. It's an absolute classic. One of my friends read it before I did and told me it was crap, but luckily I decided to read it anyway.
Maybe it's just me, because i do have a soft spot for late 19th- early 20th century books, but I think it's the mood that Fitzgerald creates that allows you to be drawn into a world that you are both familiar with and yet disconnected from at the same time.
All of the characters in some way are trapped- by society, money, relationships, love. They are dealing with it the only way they know how. This isn't a story about the good and the bad, the black and the white- it's about the grey that happens in between, which is what life is all about.
evanc88
Fitzgerald's prose is highly poetic. The man knew how to write prettier than anyone of this generation and The Great Gatsby is definitely, definitely his masterpiece. I love the novel myself. I think the characters are perfectly developed--exactly like they should be. Great writers, I think Hemingway once said, can make the reader know something even if it's not said because the writer knows what they want the reader to realize. It made sense when Hemingway said it... Here:

Ernest Hemingway wrote:
“If a writer of prose knows enough about what he is writing about he may omit things that he knows and the reader, if the writer is writing truly enough, will have a feeling of those things as strongly as though the writer has stated them.”


I think it's absolutely true (it is heavily reinforced by Hemingway's short story, Hills Like White Elephants) and Fitzgerald's book is another perfect example. I love the descriptions of the city and its outskirts, too. He was a great writer.
scimitarmoon
I didn't hate this book, but I didn't particularly care for it either. I felt more like it left me exactly where I started, without really accomplishing anything in the meantime. It was fine to read, but left me feeling generally unimpressed. It didn't help that I couldn't relate to or make myself like or appreciate any of the characters. Then again, I generally lack any sense of appreciation for "classic" literature.
RoughitforGreen247
I am very much a fan of The Great Gatsby. I think the problem a lot of modern readers have with it, though, is that literature wasn't the entertainment medium that it is today when it was written. Books weren't mass produced and they weren't something that you lay down with and expected to become enthralled in. It was a great deal like painting or architecture, not really modern fiction.
FunDa
I've heard this book's name in several places, but never bothered to find out about it. I figured it would not be an interesting read based on others' opinions. Now, maybe I'll just have a look.

Thanks for changing my mind.
evanc88
FunDa wrote:
I've heard this book's name in several places, but never bothered to find out about it. I figured it would not be an interesting read based on others' opinions. Now, maybe I'll just have a look.

Thanks for changing my mind.


It's definitely worth it. Confusing at places but you'll be hard pressed to find more beautifully written prose.
Ranti84
I've read this book in high school (and kept the book), we also watched the video of it during the class.

When we were going over it, I found myself enchanted by the character of Gatsby. Fitzgerald highlighted pretty much everyone within that character as Gatsby sought to obtain something he wanted by being someone he really wasn't.
evanc88
Ranti84 wrote:
I've read this book in high school (and kept the book), we also watched the video of it during the class.

When we were going over it, I found myself enchanted by the character of Gatsby. Fitzgerald highlighted pretty much everyone within that character as Gatsby sought to obtain something he wanted by being someone he really wasn't.


It's definitely, definitely the best example, in my opinion, of a novel exploring the "american dream."
TurtleShell
I loved the Great Gatsby, too! I also read This Side of Paradise, and loved that one as well. Fitzgerald himself is an interesting guy. This Side of Paradise and Great Gatsby both were sad, as was Fitzgerald himself--but definitely worth checking out.
linangan
When I read "The Great Gatsby" a few years ago I confess that I didn't really care for it very much. This summer I gave it another chance, and I'm glad that I did because it has given me a whole new perspective on the classic novel. Reading it as an eighteen-year old, I was annoyed by how the book seems to be a frivolous glimpse into the foibles of frivolous characters living in the fashionable society of 1920s New York. Reading it as a twenty-five year old, however, made me catch on to what those seemingly frivolous characters are meant to represent and how their fates seem to make a bleak statement about the future of the American dream, and of society in general. Other reviews have delved into Gatsby's themes pretty well, so I will spare you from yet another interpretation; what I will implore readers to do is this: for those of you who have disliked Gatsby in the past, give it another chance and look closer this time. You might be surprised by what you see. For those of you who are going to be reading Gatsby for the first time, soak it in - don't just give this book a distracted look-through at the beach. If you don't you may find yourself in the former group a few years down the road. I sure did.
AlmightySenator
I think that the book is rather amazing, since the themes are still relevent today. The general theme that I got from it was about friendships. It's been a while since I read it (7+years), but the general idea is that people are attracted to a life of luxury and whatnot. Everyone was Gatsby's friend when he was rich. When he died, noone went to his funeral. Maybe it's just human nature. You can also look at that through the scope of graduating grammar school/high school/college. You're friends with people, and you say you'll stay in touch, but more often than not you don't.
missdixy
I admit that at first, I had somewhat of a hard time getting into this book. But, once I did get into it..my gosh, I loved it..Great themes and just...gahh...written so WELL. Love it.
gerpg
Ok, this book is officially the most boring book i've ever read. Its just not my 'cup of tea' so to speak... Its so hard to get into its hard to follow when you lose interest and you never know who's who and where's what how when who...

Laughing

Louis.
ddukki
After reading it the first time, I hated it. My teacher, I thought at the time, made too much out of it. But when we started discussing the symbols and figurative language, I read it again, and grew to like it after all. Really good writing, I just think that I have a little bit of literature classes left to take before I appreciate it fully.
McDucque
I love this book, Fitzgerald in general, but this one definitely goes in my Top 5 ever.

I don't feel like going into specifics.

But any book that involves driving over a slutty puppy-mooch flapper... is clearly.. classic.
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