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Programming





Philosiphical-Art
Latley i've been wanting to learn all that i can about programming and all that jazz. But i have no idea where to start...

Whats the best thing i can start out with? Like to learn the basics.

I know html and xhtml if that would be any use to me...

~Art
eepman
It mostly depends on what you are programming for.
html and xhtml are web based languages and do not run by themselves on a computer. Some web languages that are dynamic and change are php and perl.
But c++ and c run standalone on a computer. To program with these you need an editor like notepad and a compiler for the code.

I personally know the gist of C++ and php but can get around with others.

I've only read one book, and it is a very good one.
Practical C++ Programming by Steve Oualline

Its an O'Reilly book so go to www.oreilly.com to see some info.

Anything else just respond.
carl005
I've been taking a seminar in c++ this past year so I've had the luxury of a teacher, unlike you. If your school offers an intro to programming course, I highly suggest you take it. If not, then go to Barnes & Noble or Amazon.com and look for books on intro to c++. From what I understand c++ is as about basic as you can get without using a dead language like Qbasic. hope that helps.
Philosiphical-Art
Thanks this helps ALOT. And no my school dosen't offer anything :'( But I'm probably gonna buy a book on C++ Thanks again

~Art
akky
yeah i say to go into programming that knowing the following languages would be very helpful:
-Java
-C++
-.Net
Im thinking of going into Programming myself actually. Very Happy
hahame
want to learn well a language u must write them often.if u have some object to make by the lnguage ,u will find how to make they ,how to write them for more well work. this will give u more energe to learn them and pick up them
bgillingham
I have been programming since 1978 - as have been my two brothers. Since my sister was born in 1976, she didn't learn to program until the 80's.

Hmm... I have programmed in Assembly, BASIC, Fortran, Pascal, Cobol, Perl, PHP, Visual Basic, C+, C# for .Net, Delphi, HTML... I even helped write a propriatary parser for Mortgage software - and then write code in that parser's syntax. I probably left out a couple more languages.... It is all almost the same. Some old languages are severely limited since they don't use OO (Object Oriented) programming, or because they use only one unit listing... For the most part, the syntax is just a little bit different.

I feel that the absolute best way to learn any programming language is by modifying existing code. By looking at code - for modification, you are learning what the various blocks of code do. It is especially helpful if you have a complete program with lots of units / includes that you can TRACE through in order to better understand the flow.

That isn't the best way to learn actually. There are many good books and training / tutorials out there. Formal education on the subject is probably the best, but I wouldn't trade what I have for that becuase I have a bigger foundation than they could ever give you in 4 years.

Ironically, I just borrowed a XHTML book from my brother yesterday "Bulletproof Web Design" - by Dan Cederholm. It looks like an amazingly easy read because of the copious number of example images. The subtitle is "Improving flexibility and protecting against worst-case scenarios with XHTML and CSS".

I initially learned to program by looking over my older brother's shoulder. It took much patience, but eventually I was able to detect that a given line would cause a syntax error. I am going to assume that you don't have this "older brother" method of learning.

What hahame says sums it all up -- with practice, comes perfection. As with anything, you need to work at it to become any good. So, you have lots of example code snippets to write and test before you're writing anything major.
Svarn
My vote is for formal education, either at college or university. You can't beat the environment and the stimulus for learning given through assignments and such. Working on your own is better once you have already gone through some course work on the subject or have a strong grounding in programming in general.
ChaosMike
I've been learning Java in my school for 2 years (now Im taking AP Java, AP test on tuesday Shocked )

Java is pretty simple if you're into programming, but I don't see much use for learning it, at least for me Smile
{name here}
I learnt BASIC, then Pascal, then C. I am self taught, though I have problems understanding more advanced concepts because I started with BASIC. If I could learn it all over again, I would learn it in reverse so that I could gain a solid grip on programming concepts. Learning online can get you only so far, though. You need footholds in mathmatical concepts, and computer science to truely do well. Wikibooks can only teach you so much on these subjects. Learn yourself some C, Pascal or BASIC. C will introduce you into more advanced concepts that will make it easier to learn other languages. Pascal has a strict syntax that will introduce you into proper coding, keeping you shelded like basic, but retaining some concepts from C. BASIC is the easiest route, though advanced concepts such as OOP will elude you and bad habits formed by it will haunt you unti, you get yoiurself used to a better language, though it will still impeade your learning.
Also, do not, under any circumstance, learn java. Even assembly or raw hex editing isn't that much of a prick to deal with compared to java.
DimaSafr
I am sort of learning Visual Basic .NET, that is a fine language and syntacsis does not seem to be very anoying. So I think it is a good solution for a beginer or someone who is not very fond of mathematical equasions. Visual Studio .NET express edition is avaliablr for free non comersial use, so that is a good thing.

But probably to start with, I would advise you VBA (Visual Basic Applications) this is sort of sub programing language that runs on the MS office platform. And mainly used in Exel and Access development. It is a useful thing to know if your programing is business centered (database, spreadsheets and other office rubish. :) ). Also it will help you to get into gits of scripting.

Hope it is any use.
osbits
I don't think .net and Java things are programming.If you want make programming a career .Net and Jave may be a good choice but you will never get the essense of programming.
If you really love it,Assembly and C are the best choice,programming with these language is programming..Net and Jave things are just toy bricks,programming with them just like a kids bricking.You will never understand computer by them.
Pick up some books on the colleage students' desktop,it is the things you need.And the things that most people think of out-of-date.
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