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Homeschooling- What do you Think?





prepkid
I'm a homeschooler. (in 8th grade at the moment).
People have different views about homeschooling. Some say it's for 'social outcasts', while some say it's just another way of education. I started only a year ago, so I have been to regular junior high. Of course, I'm getting less of "social interaction", but I'm going very fast in math.
What do you think? Is homeschooling something to consider seriously, or is it just ridiculous, pointless, or lame?
hive
I think it's a better way to build knoledgments but I think too it's a worst way to lear the "the real life".
shocker
Yep, as hive said, you don't learn how to live in the real world.
My best mate and his brothers were homeschooled. While he passed every test he did, he never learnt properly (as the answers were sent out with his workbooks) and didn't learn how to interact with others properly. It's sorta like living in your own little world, as the only people you really see are your family and people at church. When he finished school and went into the workforce, he found it hard to relate to people on a non-family/non-christian level.
Blaster
I think it takes away time to interact with other students. So i don't like it. I think that public school is good enough.
sethead
prepkid wrote:
i woul think that homeschoolers have a major disadvantage in relation to social issues such as making friends and being able to co-operate in a suitable work environment. Although they would excel in academic areas that could get them better jobs but they would probably want peaceful jobs where they can work on their own
girlinjapan
I'm homeschooled, its not bad. The social thing is just a bad excuse-anyone can get out and socialize if they want. Homeschooled people are probably able to socialize more. Or at least thats the way I feel, because I went to a public high school last year.

The academic stuff is so-so though. Either some people really slack off, or some people are really really smart. It's all different, because some people teach themselves (like me) or have their parents teach them, or take college courses.
northgalaxy
i think being home schooled isnt a bad thing, i wish i was, you have the opportunity to get ahead of everyone else in public schools
jimbo12
I say no homeschooling. The social part of school is something that i feel everyone needs to learn. While it may only be highschool you learn a little about the world as well as learning to develop relationships with others. Also, how is education in homeschooling regulated for college for example? Do they get grades? I know standardized tests still apply for SAT and ACT etc.
Starflier
As long as you have some friends that you spend time with on a regular basis, you're doing alright. I've homeschooled from grade one, It works for me. I'm about the most introverted person I know, so not having to deal with mindless jerks who don't want to be there on a daily basis is a bonus.
opsdaddy
Great comments from everyone... I'm glad there are both parents and kids who are homeschooling chiming in here...

My two cents:

Homeschooling CAN be a wonderful alternative way to acquire an education. However, IMHO, it depends on several factors:

1) The dedication of the parents to make the curriculum interesting, varied, broad and relevant to the world in which we live.

2) The resources that can be brought into the mix (internet, museums, gardens, parks, universities), and sadly, these can often be limited by family income, culture, etc.

3) The determination by the parents to NOT isolate their children (for religious reasons, etc.) Otherwise, it can have the undesired effects that come from boarding school elitism, and create underdeveloped social skills.

Anyhow, those are my thoughts. What do you think?
RaMo
i reckon home schooling is more educational and better for you, but more booring and u wont be able to interact with socialism later in life Razz
SledRun
I'm homeschooled and it works for me. It depends on your situation.
Phil
opsdaddy wrote:
Great comments from everyone... I'm glad there are both parents and kids who are homeschooling chiming in here...

My two cents:

Homeschooling CAN be a wonderful alternative way to acquire an education. However, IMHO, it depends on several factors:

1) The dedication of the parents to make the curriculum interesting, varied, broad and relevant to the world in which we live.

2) The resources that can be brought into the mix (internet, museums, gardens, parks, universities), and sadly, these can often be limited by family income, culture, etc.

3) The determination by the parents to NOT isolate their children (for religious reasons, etc.) Otherwise, it can have the undesired effects that come from boarding school elitism, and create underdeveloped social skills.

Anyhow, those are my thoughts. What do you think?


Good comments. We have homeschooled all our kids for the past 12 years. My oldest in his second year of college and just joined the Army Reserve. He scored a 28 on his ACT.
There are a lot of misconceptions about Homeschooling. But I find it's what you put into it. My wife has been incredibly dedicated to it- and I think that is the key. Many times I've come home to no dinner or chores not done because she has spent the whole day tending to the kids. I'm also the sole breadwinner so she can stay home. A sacrifice we made to our kids.
One of the biggest misconceptions is the "Social" thing. Again this is what you make it. If the parents are generally social, the kids will be too. There are a number of events organized by homeschoolers in any given area at any given time. Both my oldest have also been active in the Civil Air Patrol in this area.
Of course homeschooling is NOT for everyone. We know of families that, if nothing else, give homeschooling a bad name. But it's always the parent's involvement that makes the difference.
And it's not just religious people that homeschool. I heard of a family in this area a few years back that decided their 5-year old was destined for the Olympics, so they homeschooled so the kid could train. In my opinion, this is wrong.
odinstag
hive wrote:
I think it's a better way to build knoledgments but I think too it's a worst way to lear the "the real life".


I don't think any of you are qualified to even have an opinion.

You have no fact to back it up or experience.

The last thing a child needs is to learn from a screaming mass of other children. That's not learning much at all. Even the interaction isn't really the best IMHO.

I take my kids out almost every day to the park to play with other kids or to the children's museum to play with other kids. I will admit they are kind of mean to each other(my kids to one another) but they do very well witht he other kids.

And if I want them to learn how the real world is, they are not going to get that from more 6-7 year olds that have learned how it is from the TV. They are going to get that by interaction with adults and learning to do things for themselves.

Ever notice how we didn't have any of these problems before major public schools?

But now it seems to me that school is more about what they can protest next. I for one do not want my kids involved in this social experiment.

My kids are so much better to deal with because they haven't learned how to act from the TV or from other kids. They follow my directions well and interact well with other adults and children. Not to mention my school aged child is far ahead in math and reading/writing.

I am all for home school for young kids and public school in Highschool if they choose.
sistahgeek
Homeschooling is not a bad thing. I am in favor of it. I am a product of public and private education. I also was homeschooled in a way, because in addition to my regular schoolwork, in my early (foundation) years, my mother always had workbooks (math, reading, handwriting, etc) for me to do at home - and I always had books of my own and free, encouraged, access to the public library.

I'm in my mid-30s now, and when I get married and have children I want to either homeschool or send them to a private Christian school like the one I went to (not fundamentalist). Even if I can't do either exclusively, they will still receive much instruction and clarification of what they've been taught at school, at home.

Those who say the social aspect of homeschooling is a drawback are ignorant. There are plenty of ways that parents of homeschoolers can make sure their children are socialized. But, it takes planning and initiative. In other words, it's not for the LAZY.
alkady
Homeschooling, Hmm.... Well It doesnt allow a person being tutored at home to develop his social skills, But it does allow him to get all the attention from the teacher so if he stuck, He can easily get help and learn at his pace.
prepkid
I thank everyone for those wonderful opinions!

Like the majority of posters above, it really depends on the situation. I don't know if this is same for everyone, but here it's more of independent study. There are VERY few homeschool 'groups'. However, the district does its best to keep it 'socializable' for everyone. We have science classes which brings all home-schoolers together once in two months or so, and same goes for field trips and such. I have met some really nice people my own age who homeschools around my area.

And about 'socializing'....Well, it can be kind of nerverecking sometimes because you see so few people of the opposite gender. Embarassed
redhawk1044
i think that the home schooling of childeren isn't the best thing that you could for your child. For starters the child is missing out on crucial interaction developement. When going to school at home the child is not interacting with other people their age which means that they are going to be behind others later on in life. Next, they are missing out on learning from others their age. By missing out on this they are not learning how to take critism from others of their own age and may respond poorly to this later on in their life harming them in their business and personal relationships.
Frozen Balrog
I have been both Homeschooled and Public schooled. This year i was in Public school, it was kinna nice to have a bunch of people everywhere that you knew, but i think the educational atmosphere is worse. It is a huge distraction and alot of time is spent at leaste if you apply yourself, sitting arround doing nothing. My grades in school right now are: 109% (Comptia Hardware) 103% (Integrated Science) 90% (English) and 113% (Geometry) so i do alot of sitting around doing nothing. My mom is a stickler for grading so my grades at home weren't that high so it was alot more challengning for me. Maybe it's just my school is retarded cause their classes are easy, but i have the highest grade out of anyone i know except for english so i think that it's just that homeschooling just gives you a better education. I also think that since alot of people think homeschooling is crap (They know only the people that use homeschooling as an excuse not to do anything) Everones opinion of Homeschooling goes down. About the social thing.... I do think that it gives more of a chance to work with a wide variety of personalities and characteristics. But in the long run as far as if you get a job and go to college you will have a good social life. I have friends that live all over the US and people that are in college are my friends so i'm not really limited personally socially but i can definatly see how some people may be.... So thats my opinion
benwhite
Elite colleges don't tend to look favorably on homeschooling, I imagine because it's it difficult to judge. They'll be open to all candidates, but it's easier to be recognized as outstanding if you're working within the system instead of outside of it.
girlinjapan
benwhite wrote:
Elite colleges don't tend to look favorably on homeschooling, I imagine because it's it difficult to judge. They'll be open to all candidates, but it's easier to be recognized as outstanding if you're working within the system instead of outside of it.

Thats not true. Many elite colleges are quite open to homeschoolers. Most homeschoolers who in the first place apply to elite colleges know the application process and the fact that it is harder to compare them to regular applicants from public schools. For this reason alot of ambitious homeschoolers take a bunch of standardized tests and college courses at nearby CC's to have standardized scores to compare. You'll find homeschoolers in almost any top college these days. Very Happy
benwhite
I didn't say there weren't any. I said, and I've been informed of this, that the rate of acceptance of homeschooled kids is lower than that of other groups.
Donutey
home schooling doesn't allow people to see the usual gradient of people within the "real world" so to speak. You don't have to be around people you don't like, and you don't have to deal with it. (which can be a positive/negative)
wumingsden
I myself go to a public school and am home tutored so have the best of both worlds. I like being home tutored best though because it gives me more freedom and more time to do what I like best. In school you cannot question a lot of things, like for instance my timetable, whereas at home I can choose what to do when I want which is good. Also, at school there are a lot of rules which in my opinion aren't needed, like having to walk on the right hand side of the corridor, don't read in the courtyards, don't listen to music during break, wear school uniform, only allowed to wear a maixmum of one watch, ring and chain, etc, when all of the teachers do what they like.
Sometimes however I feel a little betrayed by the school because of the fact that they are utterly useless in every sense of the word. I also know that the school as a whole only wants my grades to show improvements from last year which isn't a nice feeling.
Darkwind
I was never home schooled, but my good friend was his whole life. Their entire family was home schooled, and he is a social butterfly. So is the rest of them. They participate in school sports (swim team) so they interact with others their ages. Now my buddy is at Westpoint and served a tour in Iraq last year. So really, it all depends on the person. If a child is home schooled and never let out of the house like a bad remake of Cinderella, then I suppose they will never build those "real world" skills. But if they are allowed to particiapte in community events, then the one-on-one teaching will inevitably provide a better education since it will be solely based on ability and not the average student.
coolclay
I think its the best thing ever I wish my parents had homeschooled me. They were planning on it but unfortunately they got a divorce and were unable to spend the time needed to teach me. If I was I could have graduated early, I could have had lots more free time, and lots of other things. Oh well, I am going to do everything I can to homeschool my children so that I can spend more time with them, and teach them what they really need to know, not the stupid curriculum crap they teach in school.
rdrs
Hello there,

homeschooling is something I've been thinking about a bit lately. In my country, there's no such thing - the percentage of children being homeschooled is doesn't reach 1%. I suppose it happens that parents never felt qualified, or had the time to devote themselves to such a task. Indeed, today scholarity is compulsory until the 12th school year, and getting off that one means an obscene amount of paperwork.

Most people here went to state schools. Some are better, some are worse. The current philosophy is to seek a common baseline when adjusting difficulty levels, and there is no such thing as special classes for advanced students. I went through university, met many students from other countries, and even saw how russian and ucranian emmigrants were sending their children to special classes on weekends - they feel our system is too lax. It is my opinion as well, and that's where homeschooling comes along. Rather than simply coaching my kids through their schooling, I'd like to add some material to their formation.

But then I'm very wary of doing that. Sending your child to school, to extra-school languages classes, even to personal tutoring - those are all ways to put the responsibility on someone else. Responsibility: how do you know you're qualified to homeschool your child? Teachers, even if they lack that teaching vein, have other teachers with whom to discuss methods with, and years of experience in dealing with youngsters.

I've been a sort of a teacher myself: I gave a formation course on a specific software we use at university. You're teaching young adults here, but the same things come along - how much experience do you need until you manage to explain the same concept in 101 different ways, so that it reaches the audience?

Concerning the central thread of the topic, society learning. Even though I went to school, I was much of an introvert until university. I don't think school had that much of an influence on that part of my character - rather, sometimes it made me even more withdrawn. Social issues appear to concern most people - and nonetheless it would appear homeschooled individuals did not suffer from lack of interaction.

What do psychologists say about the subject? Are homeschooled people fundamentally different from those who are not? Is there a way to ascertain if parents and children are suitable for this type of formation?

Regards,

Renato
Mrs Lycos
I'm in favor of homeschooling. I went to a public school all my life and it didn't help in my "social life". I wish I could do it with my children, but in my country it's not a choice yet. I does not only help improve intellectual skills, but also helps to create a perspective on "the world". Nowadays school is mandatory from the age of 5 in my country. In this way, society "moulds" you into their way of living, their way of thinking. What if I don't want my children to be stupidized into that "way" of things? Besides, every year school curricula becomes smaller and smaller because not all children can achieve the minimum goals expected; so they level down. Every generation learn less than the previous one. If a child has more potential he just goes unnoticed because most teachers have to struggle with slow kids; which are usually more than half a class.
supposing
I was home-educated, along with my older sister, until grade 5. Between grades 5-8, I attended three different public schools. After 8th grade, I returned to home-education. Soon, I began attending community college part-time, and I ended up earning my A.A. degree two weeks before completing 'highschool.'

I have many friends who have at least the same amount of intelligence I do, but academically, I jumped two years ahead of them. Why?

There are two reasons:

1) As a young child, I was given the freedom to discover the joy of learning.

2) As a teenager, I was given the freedom to choose my own courses of study and advance at my own pace.

It is hard to judge 'homeschoolers' as a group because there are so many different styles of home-education, but it is possible to judge the potential of home-education.

Home-education can have immense social advantages over typical schooling. As a home-educated student, I had the time to volunteer with all sorts of different organizations. As a result, I learned how to interact with all sorts of different people (including my peers). Traditionally schooled students learn only how to interact with their peers. I have met several public highschoolers who, not knowing how to approach strange adults, were afraid to initiate even such small interactions as ordering a pizza; I'm not joking.

Additionally, in my experience, home-educated students learn far more about themselves during their adolescence than traditionally schooled students. This self-awareness increases their self-confidence, a vital factor in so many aspects of human life.

And is it hard to imagine that with this variety of experiences and self-awareness comes great strength of character?

Personally, I believe that compulsory schooling is inherently wrong. I believe that public (that is, freely available) schools could be a wonderful thing--I certainly enjoyed my studies at college. But, I don't understand how people expect children to learn and grow when they are told where to place each foot, every step of the way.
SerendipityRose
Just as many have said here, the social issue for homeschoolers is so NOT an issue for most homeschoolers. The deal is that there as many (or more) different ways to homeschool as there are to go to school.

Some homeschoolers do a school-at-home type thing and push their kids hard, others allow their children to learn at their own pace in their own way. Some homeschool for religious reasons, some feel like they need to protect their children from something like violence, peer pressure, etc. Some homeschool families allow their children to learn by playing and ONLY doing what they love to do, no schoolwork if they don't want to because they trust that children inherently have a need to succeed if they are treated with respect and supported in their endeavors. That doesn't mean that they just do whatever they want, it means that the parents do whatever it takes to help their children get the skills they need by listening to their childrens needs and interests. Each child may have different needs and interests so it can become very complicated and difficult but rewarding as they grow up and feel confident in themselves and not only excel at whatever they choose to do but ENJOY it because their minds haven't been clouded by all of those trivia facts that traditional education can put into their minds!

I personally have three children that I have homeschooled for most of their lives. The oldest decided that he wanted to go to school in the 9th grade, so he did and graduated this year and will be going to college. He is interested in computer programming/website design. The middle one is an avid gamer and spends a lot of time gaming but does volunteer work and has a yard care business. He plans on going to work at his Dad's construction company in a year or so because he loves to work with his hands. The youngest one is an avid gamer and loves animals. He has no idea yet what he wants to do, but he is free to do whatever he wants! He's only 14 and has plenty of time to play around with lots of ideas and try new things!

My children have friends of all religions, races, ages and gender. In real life THAT's what you get! Not 30 people of the SAME age! When you go to work your boss does NOT want to stand in front of you and tell you exactly how to do your job EVERYDAY! He wants someone that he can tell what job needs to be done and that employee will figure out how to get it completed in the best way possible!

But, I don't think that homeschooling is the ONE and ONLY way for everyone to go because I also feel that it takes ALL kinds of people to make a world work. Homeschooling is just another way to live your lives!

Don't worry! Be happy!

Very Happy
charseips
I'm a Brit and went to a British comprehensive (I think you Americans call it public school- although public school here means a paid for education.)

And if I hadn't I would be a wreck. OK so I could have done better academically but I feel that I would have next to no social skills. I was a shy kid and didn't really progress socially with more than about 5 friends until I was about 14/15. I've just completed my BA (Hons) and experienced a fantastic social place of university, I don't know how I would have coped had I been home schooled, it just isn't something that can be taught without practical sessions of trying to interact with others. These days I'm an outgoing guy with brilliant interpersonal skills and I have to thank my year 10 Drama teacher for that. She helped me to develop my voice and increase its volume and through various exercises in class I was able to realise that what I had to say was interesting to people and that my thoughts were worth hearing too.

I can understand situations where home schooling is the appropriate option but I do not believe that it is the right option for most children. Particularly as the parents who become the teachers are usually not qualified and it does tend to lead to social problems in later life (I recall reading a psychological study on the effects of home schooling- I'm afraid I can't remember the name of it but that was it's boiled down conclusion).

Life ain't easy and we all need to be imbued with those life skills, because at the end of the day the grades you get don't make a bit of difference, they might make some things a bit easier, but at the end of the day, if you want to do it not having the school grades won't stop you.
SerendipityRose
charseips wrote:
Life ain't easy and we all need to be imbued with those life skills, because at the end of the day the grades you get don't make a bit of difference, they might make some things a bit easier, but at the end of the day, if you want to do it not having the school grades won't stop you.


This is exactly right. Grades are only meaningful in a school setting so that teachers can be held "accountable" for the time they put in. They show in now way what a person actually understands, just what they have memorized for the grade. Smile
SerendipityRose
I went to public school also. Shy. I didn't learn how to make REAL friends until I got out of school. I think college is a great place to make friends because you have classes with people who may have the same general interest as yourself PLUS unless your parents made you go to college, you are there because that's what YOU want to do! Smile
JoeFriday
I used to think that homeschooling was bad for the child because of the 'social skills' argument.. that idea was probably embedded in my head by teachers, who not so coincidentally could potentially lose their jobs if homeschooling became more popular.. in other words, don't trust teachers to tell you what's best for the student.. they often are actually telling you what's best for the teacher

in recent years, I've seen a trend where the students scoring the highest on tests are almost invariably in private schools or homeschooled.. that sparked my interest and I started to do some research, and talked to a few homeschool parents.. I was very surprised to see how motivated and active the parents are in their child's education.. unlike public school teachers who see it as a 8am to 4pm job, 9 months of the year, and only see the students for one year before passing them on.. the parents are clearly more dedicated as they are concerned about the long-term development of their child

also, the child is always being taught at his level, rather than having to slow down so the rest of the class can catch on to a topic.. the homeschool child is rarely bored because the lesson plan is geared specifically to him.. and homeschooling tends to spend more time teaching ' tangible skills'.. math, reading, writing.. rather than dwelling on public school curricula, which is often focused on 'social skills'.. ie, 'getting along' and 'diversity'.. while getting along is certainly a good skill to have, being able to read and write is much more likely to take you places in life

and as far as learning social skills.. who would you rather have your child learn them from... you (an adult) or 100 kids that learn their social skills from watching MTV?

sure, it might feel awkward for the homeschool child going through his teenage years with a more mature outlook on life.. but a good education is designed to help the child throughout his entire life.. not just until he turns 18 and buys a car
SerendipityRose
Well said Joe Friday!
snjripp
I think that homeschooling can be great and could also be a problem if not handled correctly. I think it takes so much effort on someone's (usually a parent's) part in order for it to be what it needs to be. That is a huge committment and not all parents have either the particular talents or desire to be able to home school their kids. So, I don't think non-homeschooled kids should be looked down upon. At the same time, if it is a particlar person's vocation to homeschool--then it can be wonderful and enriching for kids and there seem to be so many groups of homeschoolers around that you can make the interactions happen that you want for social development.
SerendipityRose
snjripp wrote:
I think that homeschooling can be great and could also be a problem if not handled correctly. I think it takes so much effort on someone's (usually a parent's) part in order for it to be what it needs to be. That is a huge committment and not all parents have either the particular talents or desire to be able to home school their kids. So, I don't think non-homeschooled kids should be looked down upon. At the same time, if it is a particlar person's vocation to homeschool--then it can be wonderful and enriching for kids and there seem to be so many groups of homeschoolers around that you can make the interactions happen that you want for social development.


Another very well said comment! It does take all kinds of people to make a world. We don't all need to come out of the same box to get along do we?
JoeFriday
I agree that homeschooling can be done poorly if the parents are disorganized or don't really know what their goals are.. but I would guestimate that only a very small percentage of homeschooling situations are like that

as for those of us who were taught in public schools.. ask yourself this.. how many of your teachers were exceptional? how many were average? and how many were pretty worthless? how much of your time in school would you consider 'wasted' due to lack of focus, subject matter you didn't understand or weren't interested in, and time spent screwing around with other students?

even an average homeschooling arrangement is probably better than most public schools on a day-in, day-out basis
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