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Maximum Hard Disk Capacity





Animal
I'm currently using a Dell Inspiron 8200 Laptop computer and was recently looking into upgrading my hard disk drive. I spoke to Dell and was told that the maximum memory my computer could address is 60Gb.

Could somebody please explain if this is actually true, or if it's a limit set by the BIOS or some other factor? (I've heard Dell can impose a load of restrictions on their computers). Is there any possible way to use a larger hard disk, or would I need to go external?

I run WinXP Home and Ubuntu Linux on dual-boot.

Thanks for any advice!
Very Happy
Boles Roor
Um, I don't have experiences with Dell but I seriously doubt they could o_O That'd almost be a crime, maybe even is. o_o

To bypass the limit in the BIOS you should findout what Motherboard you have. Download a new BIOS update from the manufacturer, and flash the bios. Bye bye Messed-up-Dell-BIOS.
gh0stface
Animal wrote:
I'm currently using a Dell Inspiron 8200 Laptop computer and was recently looking into upgrading my hard disk drive. I spoke to Dell and was told that the maximum memory my computer could address is 60Gb.

Could somebody please explain if this is actually true, or if it's a limit set by the BIOS or some other factor? (I've heard Dell can impose a load of restrictions on their computers). Is there any possible way to use a larger hard disk, or would I need to go external?

I run WinXP Home and Ubuntu Linux on dual-boot.

Thanks for any advice!
Very Happy

I'm not sure, but you SHOULD be able to upgrade your Laptop Hard Drives to whatever size Laptop hard drives that are currently available. I don't think the BIO will limit it. I could be wrong though. But I mean, if you think about it, why would Hard Drive manufacturers build retail hard drives for consumers to use?

Boles Roor wrote:
Um, I don't have experiences with Dell but I seriously doubt they could o_O That'd almost be a crime, maybe even is. o_o

To bypass the limit in the BIOS you should findout what Motherboard you have. Download a new BIOS update from the manufacturer, and flash the bios. Bye bye Messed-up-Dell-BIOS.

The thing with Dell is, they have custom BIOS for their computers.
Boles Roor
But, by flashing the BIOS you completely remove the old? I once put an MSI BIOS on my ASUS MoBo. Though, as I said, I have no experience with Dell, so I'm probably wrong. It just seems weird you can't get rid of it
bassgs_17
Grr... Curse you Dell. Only us 13337 h4x0r5 are allowed to do stuff like that... Try flashing your BIOS, it might help. You could borrow a large laptop HDD from a friend, and try it.
-Aquastrike
Animal
Well, I did some research and found the following Dell support page:

Dell wrote:
There is not a mentionable set max-capacity hard drive that your computer will recognize; however, Dell can only certify functionality for the hard drive sizes that we offer specifically for the respective computer.

The preceding is not to say that a larger drive will not work though, just that we’ve not tested it.


In other words, they want you to buy a new computer from them, so they say the HD maximum is 60Gb when it's not really.

So after a bit of investigation, I've found that my hard disk is an IDE, 2.5" (laptop) HD and my computer supports a maximum of 5400RPM. I've been searching a few hardware websites to find 2.5" IDE drives, but in some searches I've been given ATA-100 Hard Disks as a result.

I know SATA disks and probably ATA-133 won't work, but is there a difference between ATA-100 and IDE / EIDE?

Thanks for any advice,

Very Happy
TheGeek
thats a false statement by Dell. They SELL Inspirations with 80 and 100GB drives already in them. Im pretty sure that you can upgrade it since they sell them with bigger ones. The only thing i know about hard drives a dells is that my dad has a dell desktop and he put a 200GB in his recently and had some trouble with it. He had to get special drivers and had to do some bios work to get it to recognize the full 200GB of space, it was only recognizing 30GB for some reason.
Clash
Animal wrote:
So after a bit of investigation, I've found that my hard disk is an IDE, 2.5" (laptop) HD and my computer supports a maximum of 5400RPM. I've been searching a few hardware websites to find 2.5" IDE drives, but in some searches I've been given ATA-100 Hard Disks as a result.

I know SATA disks and probably ATA-133 won't work, but is there a difference between ATA-100 and IDE / EIDE?
ATA-100 and ATA 133 are just different performance levels for hard drives. Your BIOS will probably support both. EIDE is Enhanced IDE, which is old hat now, as all drives are EIDE, again just faster access times/speeds They also use the 80 wire connector, but will work on a 40 wire. SATA is a big difference with different connectors.

You should have no problem with any size of disk, presuming your BIOS is up to date. It's a bit of a grind trying to find Dell BIOS on the NET as they are really Phoenix or AMI or Award, with slightly different numbers, so you have to be careful.

Remember Dell make SFA, they just assemble boxes. If you don't believe that read the FCC id off any Dell branded component and look it up in the FCC database, you'll soon find the real manufacturer. In fact they used to really piss me off with one year warranties on monitors and hard disks when the original manufacturer was giving three years on the same components. Twisted Evil
alkady
Laptops uses proprietary technology. In other words, You can buy say a Dell 2000 Laptop motherboard, But you can only use certain parts made specifically for the 2000. A 60 GB HDD is unreasonable since there is bigger ones. But perhaps the Laptop doesnt support higher than 60 GB.
psycosquirrel
That is an incorrect statement, alkady. It would be economically unfeasable for Dell to make custom hard drives. They probably get them from an external source and import them. I actually had a server running off an ex-dell laptop hard drive, until I dismantled it for parts.


Back on topic, www.newegg.com has 2.5in laptop hdds.

I would not risk changing the hdd and voiding the warantee. Instead, get a USB-interfaced external drive case and a drive to go in it. For example:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E16817155704
Case/ USB encoder for drive

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E16822136006
Decent 100Gb hdd for relatively low price.


http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.asp?Submit=ENE&SubCategory=380&N=2010150380
link to all laptop hard drives on the Egg


Any laptop hard drive should work fine. The interface for all of them is essentially the same, because you can convert the signal to standard IDE with a basic converter without a hitch. My only concern would be that the native voltage for the dells drive may vary (sounds like something dell would do), but TheGeek has disproved that theory. If you have some computer knowledge and are willing to sacrifice your warantee, I say go for the new internal drive. Otherwise, just use an external...
Animal
psycosquirrel wrote:
I would not risk changing the hdd and voiding the warantee. Instead, get a USB-interfaced external drive case and a drive to go in it.


Hi, thanks for the input.

Unfortunately, my laptop is almost 4 years old, so the waranty isn't really a concern. I need the extra space to run both Win XP and Linux on dual boot, and I can't boot from a USB device (because Dell in their infinite wisdom have altered the BIOS to remove this functionality), but even if I could, the built-in USB ports on my computer are USB1.1. I have a USB2 PCMCIA card, but it's not recognised until an OS has loaded, so I can't boot from it either.

I've found a few 100Gb internal IDE laptop drives at a reasonable price, so I'll seriously consider it. Unfortunately, I've not had a definitive answer yet, so I'm holding off for now till I do some more research.
ForceRun
I guess your over it, but it is just the Motherboard, just look up it's specs. And if it doesn't support what you want, look for a BIOS update. I would personal just retire your laptop the older lcds seem to only last a few years anyways, sorry thats life.
Animal
ForceRun wrote:
I would personal just retire your laptop the older lcds seem to only last a few years anyways, sorry thats life.


I think it's a bit extreme to suggest that I throw my laptop into the bin because I'm running short of hard disk space! But if the truth be told, the laptops available today aren't a massive amount faster than mine.

I'm running a 1.6GHz P4M, 512Mb PC2100 RAM, 32Mb Nvidia Graphics. Newer laptops may have better chipsets, faster FSB and built-in USB2, but that's not reason enough to buy a new laptop. One of my friends just bought a brand new one with a 1.5GHz P4M processor!
psycosquirrel
But you must keep in mind that the frequency is a very small part of the performance speed of processors Very Happy His core and socket is probably newer and faster. But you are still right; don't just throw away a laptop because you need more space Laughing
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