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High Performance Linux





thiamshui
Which Linux distribution offers the best performance? Is Yoper Linux better or Gentoo Linux? Or is DSL or Feather Linux better than those? Anything to recommend?
Helios
DSL(damn small linux).

Gentoo is pretty stable too.
root
Gentoo is the best high performance distro. DSL is too damn small Razz Most advanced Linux users use Gentoo or Debian, and some use Slack. Once you get Gentoo up and running, I guarentee you will fall in love. Someone described Gentoo as a beautiful woman once, where it takes patience to get her in bed (install takes patience). But once you get her in bed and her clothes are off, you are in heaven . Dancing
linuxuzmani
for performance slackware is the best but for multimedia and easy to use i think pardus is the best.
v3nd0r
Slack is quiet good. 'Because It works' is slack slogan.

I use slack on my personal computer and I find it good. I have use a little time ago gentoo, and its good too. But generely most linux distros, get more from your hardware than windows Smile Yes i know not for all hardware are so good drivers like on windows but, in generly installing linux you will find it faster on your hardware, that the same computer with windows operating system.
thiamshui
anyone got any guides on how to install gentoo? i downloaded the gentoo 2006.0 (LiveCD version for x86) but after completing the installation wizard, nothing seems to be happening..
quartz
v3nd0r wrote:
in generly installing linux you will find it faster on your hardware, that the same computer with windows operating system.


cant say that. Default instalation with Gnome or KDE is slower than Windows. At least for me. Maybe after some configuration and instaling some ligth weight Desktop Environment u can get beter perfomance.
mwm
Take a look at centOS. Its a stipped down Redhat Enterprise distro. Installs like RHEL, fast like RHEL. Is all in the install with most distos. With some work you make just about any distro dance.

-mwm
Helios
Slack is as old as Debian.

If you want a stable system with easy setup, as I said, use Debian.
nevillethenerd
For performance in pure terms you want a custom built kernel for your hardware, an app custom written in assember and compiled for max performance and no overhead [GUI and other useless paraphernalia]. simple huh? hahaha. seriously, they are all good, you just need to work on the configuration. and that's where the trouble starts.
MikeRavenelle
No way Slackware is the most stable OS. Thats its goal too.



GO SLACK AND YOULL NEVER GO BACK!!!!
Zuwiki
MikeRavenelle wrote:
No way Slackware is the most stable OS. Thats its goal too.



GO SLACK AND YOULL NEVER GO BACK!!!!


I disagree. At least with the last sentence. I switched to Debian. Also, wasn't this topic about "high performance" Linux? Not stability?
Atomo64
I would say that the most stable is Debian 'stable', even when it is not updated so often as 'testing' or 'unstable', it is very very stable, I've never had any stabillity problem with debian stable Smile
corey
thiamshui wrote:
anyone got any guides on how to install gentoo? i downloaded the gentoo 2006.0 (LiveCD version for x86) but after completing the installation wizard, nothing seems to be happening..
http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/handbook/index.xml The difinitive guide (its on the CD as well)
thiamshui
i tried installing.. after i click on the 'install' button, after the livecd root password is set, my comp just sits there and does nothing.. Sad tried for a number of times already.. siggghh..
Zuwiki
Looking at this, you have to run fdisk, partition your drive(s), then mount a stage.

Forgot to ask, does the system actually lock up, or does it open a terminal and stop doing stuff? If you can type and do normal stuff with the terminal, it's doing what it's supposed to and if that's the case, I recommend you look at that link above. But with this talk of a LiveCD, you must be using a different install CD than I did...
{name here}
MikeRavenelle wrote:
No way Slackware is the most stable OS. Thats its goal too.



GO SLACK AND YOULL NEVER GO BACK!!!!

No. It could be the most stable linux distro, but there are more stable OSes than linux out there. BSD variants, for example.
Go for anything that has an RPM manager(the only popular one click install package manager). You'll be glad you did. Stay away from Debian if you want to end up diddling with your computer for 10 minutes to install software from a Package(debian Package to be specific) if you're a linux newb.
Zuwiki
{name here} wrote:
Stay away from Debian if you want to end up diddling with your computer for 10 minutes to install software from a Package(debian Package to be specific) if you're a linux newb.


I would definitely consider myself a Linux newb, and I would have to disagree with you. I spend about 10 seconds installing packages with Debian. Sever packages. And it includes the automated download and install. For instance, I wanted to do some 3D modelling, so I typed in a terminal "apt-get install blender" and 13 seconds later I was changing the vertices on a newly created cube. I do have to agree however that Red Hat's package manager is usually more convenient, especially since it doesn't use official repositories (to my knowledge) so that you can just download the RPM from the site and install it rather than find a repository that has the latest version of that package and add it to your sources.list.
{name here}
Zuwiki wrote:
{name here} wrote:
Stay away from Debian if you want to end up diddling with your computer for 10 minutes to install software from a Package(debian Package to be specific) if you're a linux newb.


I would definitely consider myself a Linux newb, and I would have to disagree with you. I spend about 10 seconds installing packages with Debian. Sever packages. And it includes the automated download and install. For instance, I wanted to do some 3D modelling, so I typed in a terminal "apt-get install blender" and 13 seconds later I was changing the vertices on a newly created cube. I do have to agree however that Red Hat's package manager is usually more convenient, especially since it doesn't use official repositories (to my knowledge) so that you can just download the RPM from the site and install it rather than find a repository that has the latest version of that package and add it to your sources.list.

My linux computer wasn't connected to the internet so installing packages was a miserable expiriance. I downloaded only 2 CDs, any other package I wanted downloaded seperately. Installing them that way is miserable. So, make sure you have the CDs with the packages you want or an internet connection.
Zuwiki
{name here} wrote:
My linux computer wasn't connected to the internet so installing packages was a miserable expiriance.


Oh, I see. That will surely do it.
ripdajacker
I am on suse linux. If I run it with XFCE or FluxBox then it's pretty high performance Smile

I also installed Apt for RPM so I can use apt-get like debian users...

Gentoo is a pain in the ass to install, debian is simple - so is slackware, but suse gives you the nicest installation gui. It's REALLY simple and you almost can't do anything wrong.

thiamshui, what do you plan to use a high performance linux distro for?
sergio_ykz
With a great instalation and a considerable system knowlegde slackware is the most secure, and fastest linux distro...

But...

Slack requires a nerd to be installed... and in the documentation its is not described...
tony
linuxuzmani wrote:
for performance slackware is the best...


i used to think this too. however, there is a distro which can provide optimum performance beyond slack or any other distro. arch linux, a little known distro, is built off of crux and uses i-686 machine code which means it runs faster on intel pentium 2 and higher and equivalent amds. furthermore, the installer base iso only installs the kernel, the bootloader, and very few other programs. users can use pacman, the package management system, from there to upgrade/install only the software they want. the full version of slack, like most distros, installs a good 4 or 5 gigs of software, including daemons which deplete system resources.

check it out - http://archlinux.org
TheGeek
For me, i dual boot slackware and windows on my main rig and i find that slackware, though harder than alot, if not all, distros to setup, is generally more stable and slightly more satisfying to work with simply because once you have setup the system and configured it to work with all your hardware and such, you pretty much HAVE to know the ins and outs of the OS or you didnt set the stuff up.

On my file server/CS server downstairs im running DSL, simply because it has a 2GB hard drive and a PII processor. Even with those specs, i generally get better performance out of that machine than i do with my main rig (P4 2.5Ghz, 1GB PC3200, FX5500 OC Gfx card machine with 350GB of hard drive space) in windows usually does. The only time the thing really lags is when i try to open an app. like firefox, or filezilla. Put DSL in a new machine and im sure it would absolutely fly like nothing else.

As always for any distro of linux, the lighter GUI's always will have better performance than say KDE or Gnome. I almost always use fluxbox and im currently trying to setup DR17 from enlightenment, but since it hasnt officially been released, there is no tar package available for it yet.
Richous05
Ive been looking to swith to linux for awhile and i tried linspire which was shite so ill think ill go for
Quote:
Gentoo
but i do really need to ask... Can you network a windows Xp and a Linux Pc together? Because I have a network of windows pc's in my house and im worried that i will not be able to use ICS via xp and linux.
Zuwiki
I don't know about that networking stuff, but I can tell you that if you are new to Linux, Gentoo is not the best for your first steps. I have been using Linux for years now, and I had lots of trouble trying to set it up. I would recommend try Debian first. Then, once you know more about Linux try installing Gentoo.
{name here}
You may network linux and windows PCs, but you'll need this special program or daemon, I dunno what it exactly is but I think it's called Samba. IT needs to be installed to every computer in the network, though...
zenama
A way to answer the question what distribution of Linux offers the best performance is to look at what is considered to be the best. A computer user with a computer with a small amount of storage space can consider a very small distribution to be the best. Somebody who doesn't want or is not able to spend much money can consider a free copy to be the best. Another person can admire reliability. And other computer users might like to have a very fast computer. So to answer the question can need to make the question smaller and to look at what deliverance is admired the most.
Abhishukla
GENTOO IS THE BEST BUT IF YOU GO BY PERFORMANCE THEN I SUGGEST YOU SLACKWARE.
menino
Centos is good, moreso for server performance, and you can install it after windows (as with any other linux distros), which will automatically detect windows OS, and put it in the grub boot os chooser, so at startup, you can choose what OS you want - wither Windows or Linux.

Ubuntu is a nice also for desktop. Its not too slow mostly, and has a nice GUI.
czarulit
tony wrote:
linuxuzmani wrote:
for performance slackware is the best...


i used to think this too. however, there is a distro which can provide optimum performance beyond slack or any other distro. arch linux, a little known distro, is built off of crux and uses i-686 machine code which means it runs faster on intel pentium 2 and higher and equivalent amds. furthermore, the installer base iso only installs the kernel, the bootloader, and very few other programs. users can use pacman, the package management system, from there to upgrade/install only the software they want. the full version of slack, like most distros, installs a good 4 or 5 gigs of software, including daemons which deplete system resources.

check it out - http://archlinux.org

yes, arch is quite good. small, fast and customizable.
zeda
It seems since this topic is started a long time ago it might be time to update the information in this topic.
LostOverThere
It depends on your hardware, really. I used to use Slackware and Damn Small Linux on my super old box (74MhZ, 24mb RAM). Both worked fine.

But if you're just looking for a super fast distro, I've heard great things about Arch Linux. Smile
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