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Nigerian Scam





noliver
Shocked
I can Not believe people STILL fall for this old scam Rolling Eyes

======================================
Pam Krause of Almond, Wis., thought she was helping out a desperate mother in West Africa. Instead, she lost $18,000 to an elaborate, high-tech swindle, one of the many variations of the so-called "Nigerian scams."

The most familiar Nigerian scam is an e-mail offering lots of free money in exchange for helping someone with a name like Barrister Richard Okoya. The offer varies, but the theme is the same — help a downtrodden victim recover a large sum of money trapped in an overseas bank, and you will be rewarded handsomely.

For most, the e-mails are the butt of jokes and evoke a "Who would ever fall for that?" reaction.

You'd be surprised, says Dale Miskall, supervisory special agent in charge of an FBI cybercrime squad in Birmingham, Ala. He's been working Nigerian scams for the Internet Fraud Complaint Center for years; in January, he went to Nigeria to testify against suspects after a rare arrest.

There are now so many flavors of Nigerian scams, they are harder and harder to recognize, he said. Many even avoid the trademark details: the barrister, the overseas bank, or even the typical up-front wire payment.

"(Nigerians) are just great at social engineering. They keep finding new victims," Miskall said. "And Americans are very gullible."

There are plenty of variations on the traditional scam. Nigerians apparently keep up with the news. In 2001, instead of a Nigerian barrister, the missing money belonged to an Iraqi national, persecuted under Saddam Hussein. The year before, it was family of victims of the Concorde plane crash. Earlier this year, it was a tsunami victim; then, a U.S. solider killed in Iraq during the war on terror. Anything to get an edge, or to catch victims with their guard down.

"This really is one of the worst e-mail scams we've ever seen, targeting the families of American soldiers killed in Iraq," said Michael Garcia, an assistant secretary with the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency, about the Iraq solider e-mail. "This is really despicable."

But Nigerian scams stretch far wider than e-mails asking for help moving money out of international accounts. In a much more elaborate version of the crime, scammers participate in legitimate online auctions, finish with the high bid, and send along a check to pay for the winnings.

The payment often arrives as a cashier's check, thought to be good as cash by many U.S. residents. It's not.

The criminal sends more than the winning amount and asks for some to be wired back. When victims apparently successfully deposit the cashier's check, they figure the buyer is legit, and wire the overage, often to a bank account in Nigeria. Weeks later, the bank discovers the cashier's check is bogus, and the depositor is responsible for the missing funds. Often, the victim is out both the merchandise and the money.

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
blackant
There is one from China too. They would call you on the phone and tell you that you have won a prize, and you need to pay a certain amount of money for the administration charges...

Cheaters going worldwide now...
n0obie4life
blackant wrote:
There is one from China too. They would call you on the phone and tell you that you have won a prize, and you need to pay a certain amount of money for the administration charges...

Cheaters going worldwide now...


yep. its sent to singapore Very Happy.
mohamed
Its quite a logical event as the internet is a relatively new media with plenty of "new comers" each second. All we could do is spread the message.
Bako
I still get these messages now and then, although they were much more frequent a few years ago. I am always interested to read them, because the writing is always so interesting, and I like to hear what new story someone has invented.

I thought it would make for a great movie script to have someone actually travel to Nigeria to try helping the fictional person who sent them the email (often a former prince or son of the prime minister, etc) only to find that the story was real, and they become involved in some civil war to take back the country.

Bako
Scott
I wouldn't be able to live with myself if I ever ran a scam like that.

Benefitting from real misfortunes of real people.
MULITRI
I run a golf site since 3 years ago and never had any of those emails into my 4 golf email addresses, but recently i've created a web for the Church where i live, and a few days after include that website into the search engines i started to receive those emails Laughing

There are people around the world who thinks religious people is ignorant because also they think only people with mental probs passed or hard life situations goes to Church, so the emails i'm receiving (appart of the lotto win Laughing) are oriented in that way, explaining they need your support to distribute a big amount of money in help to build churchs etc in the name of God.

The most ridiculous is that they write, for example: In a draw celebrated at Jan-25-05, your email address has been awarded with $XXXXX
lol...i had opened that email address in April WinkLaughing .. so who's da stupid and ignorant? Razz

But don't be confused, some of them are big organisations installed in a lot of countries and sometimes are extremely dangerous, if someone here don't know about them or how they act exactly, better inform you in this big community dedicated to those internet frauds and many others

http://www.419legal.org/pages.php?p=12
svhkid
ive got one of those and snce i am nigerian i already knew about those scams, so i lied about some site with like a billion popups for them to go 2
Gitesh
Internet penetration is not much in India, but the scamsters have devised new way to loot common people, they just send SMS on mobile phones and ask to contact certain email id., even people who have never ever been online ever are getting this messages, i had my mobile number on website for a while and i get a message for this every 2-3 days.
Every other day we have news about this in local newspaper, still people fall pray to this scams.
deanhills
I get calls like these from Pakistan. Claiming that the callers are agents for Etisalat, our telecommunications provider. I've got to the point where I only answer calls that are identifiable to me. I think however there is so much common sense involved in recognizing swindles. My mind completely boggles when friends of mine buy into scams like these. On the other hand it probably says something good about them being trusting and all of that. I can probably do with being a more trusting myself.
GoldenEagle
Back when I was in college, I spent a few summers in the city I went to school in so I could do research. I decided to live with one of my girlfriend's friends in a few bedroom apartment. My girlfriend was going to be living there the following semester and I could take her room for the time being.

This friend was acting as the resident landlord, but she really had no real life experience and was more or less an idiot. We were short a roommate and she was looking very consistently to find someone. She eventually said she did and the girl was going to be an exchange student from Nigeria for the summer. She was all excited and I didn't really pay much attention to it since it wasn't my problem sicne my rent didn't change (turns out this friend was padding her own pocket with the rent from us.

(ASIDE: I noticed that our rent didn't go up even though we short a roommate, so even with a person short we were able to make rent? The math wasn't lining up and she didn't like that I figured that part out)

Anyway she kept having to make these phone calls for our new roommate, which made sense because they were far away. Long story short, she started going out and wiring money to this person so that the student could come live with us, but didn't really think that maybe a person asking for money from Nigeria was really a problem. I definitely did not renew my "lease" with her next year and neither did my girlfriend.
celebi269
When I was in elementary, I received an email claiming that I won a million dollar from a lottery in Thailand. They sent me details about the prize and how to get it. At first, I was really excited about getting the money, so I sent them my personal details. Each day I keep on receiving their email whenever I send them details about myself. Then came a day where they need 4 (approx. only) dollars to process my details so that they can send the money. So I asked my mom about this and she was shocked when she knew that I was sending the scammers details about myself. She told me to stop and back then, I wasn't receiving emails from them.

Without the help of my mother, I would have been scammed. So from then on, I always pay attention to the emails people send in my account.
silverdown
Yea i get these a lot but I know well enough to spam tag the email and delete
deanhills
What we have to watch out for as well is that some of these Nigerian scam artists have wizened up to this now and are using UK or other European e-mail accounts, names and signatures to divert attention from Nigeria. The rule is always if it is too good to be true, then it is too good to be true. The last one I got yesterday asked me to download a Word document as that contained more information of my 1-million prize from Google no less. I canned the post immediately. I'm no geek but as far as I know one can really create problems in terms of cookies downloading when one downloads files from characters like these. Evil or Very Mad
Bikerman
Simply track the IP address to find out where the email came from.
http://whatismyipaddress.com/trace-email
deanhills
Bikerman wrote:
Simply track the IP address to find out where the email came from.
http://whatismyipaddress.com/trace-email
Thanks for the link. I remember we had a discussion about this once before. Where can we find our IP addresses?
Bikerman
on a windows machine the quickest method is to run the command prompt (click the start icon and enter cmd in the window at the bottom). Then type in IPCONFIG in the window that appears. The IP address of the machine will appear beneath the appropriate network interface, along with the gateway and subnet addresses.
It will look something like this:
Quote:
Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::a126:2f89:3973:eb56%10
IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.5
Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1

The IPv4 address is the one you want (for now). In my case (above) it is a local net address because my machine is part of a LAN - the 192.168 addresses are not passed around the internet because they are designated for local use and therefore are used on many machines in different institutions. The address which appears on the internet is the address on the router - in my case the device at the gateway address 192.168.1.1 To get that address you will need to telnet the router (start a terminal session). This will be described in your router manual.
For example, I type (in the above window) telnet 192.168.1.1 and get the following:
Quote:
WAN Menu

1. Configure
2. Delete
3. Show
4. Exit
/ WAN -> 3
VCC Con. Catego. Service Interface Proto. IGMP QoS
State Status IP
ID Name Name
address
0.0.38 1 UBR pppoa_0_38_2 ppp_0_38_1 PPPoA Enable Enable
Enable Up 92.27.113.222
The address of the router is at the end - 92.27.113.222
(This is not my real router address - Smile )
deanhills
Thanks for the detailed steps, and also the link. All of it is most useful. Very Happy
rohan5039
Obviously I have also received the spammers emails from different countries but mostly its from Russia or Senegal. They have send me sometimes the prize announcements and some times girls send their pictures with contact info and demands for the on-line money. And sometimes a company can ask your contact info for prize delivery info and use your identity against you, you can check these fake companies email from there inbox look ups, because mostly they don't have proper web sites and sits may look dull. But most people can't understand these things they should have proper knowledge for these kinda spammers
deanhills
rohan5039 wrote:
Obviously I have also received the spammers emails from different countries but mostly its from Russia or Senegal. They have send me sometimes the prize announcements and some times girls send their pictures with contact info and demands for the on-line money. And sometimes a company can ask your contact info for prize delivery info and use your identity against you, you can check these fake companies email from there inbox look ups, because mostly they don't have proper web sites and sits may look dull. But most people can't understand these things they should have proper knowledge for these kinda spammers
You probably need a proper Spam Filter. I'm no expert on those, but I'm sure you may be able to find some e-mail software that has that.

We have one at work that catches most of the bad ones, but regrettably as a result some of the good ones too. So I now have a separate Spam E-Mail Box (in addition to Junk Mail) I have to check through too to scan through the spam in case a good post has been caught in it. I find quite a lot of the .co.uk posts or posts from international e-mail addresses caught in here.

And then of course there are still some spam that gets through into my White listed e-mails as well.

I have to look in three places for my e-mails at work now: My White-listed mail, my Junk Mail, and the separate e-mail box for Black-Listed Mail.

I hate spam, and I also don't like the SMS spam messages I'm getting on my phone either.
Evil or Very Mad
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