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e-books vs. hardcopy






Could e-books on digital readers ever replace hardcopy books?
It's going to happen, really.
24%
 24%  [ 37 ]
I doubt it.
75%
 75%  [ 115 ]
Total Votes : 152

hades9366
I've tried reading a few e-books but I've always given up. I just don't like looking at digitised text when I'm reading a novel. I like the feel, the weight and even the smell of books but I can see the sense of switching to digital text. For one thing they'd be cheaper to release, meaning the author should get to keep more of the royalties. There's also the forests we'd theoretically be saving. So what do you think? Will e-books ever replace hardcopy books?
sniffass
I hope that ebooks don't replace hard copies. Paper books are a part of history and fantastic for the future. When a new pdf version is released ebooks can get incompatible etc. Paper books will never have incompatiblity (unless the languages changes too much). I don't find it comfortable sitting at a computer screen for hours. With a standard novel I can go and lie down and read it, I can bring it closer to my eyes or further away. I find ebooks a bit of a strain. Personally I think ebooks are an excellent compliment to paper books. Putting relatively short and informative documents in to ebook form is great, especially since I hate lugging heavy books around. Putting product manuals on CD is a good idea.

So to sum it up, I don't really know if paper books will be replaced, I should say that won't happen and I hope it doesn't. I think ebooks will be used more and more to compliment and supiment hard copies.

Gabe
papamurphy
You don't get that sensational smell with e-books. It just isn't the same staring at a computer screen reading, then the actual page turning of paper books. I guess if we ever get to the technical future of VR book reading, with smell, texture, etc. Then perhaps it will take over, but until then I don't think Barnes and Noble will be going anywhere.
jockmcgonzo
To be honest despite the fact that i currently do a lot of my reading in ebook form on my symbian phone severely doubt this will ever happen. mainly because even though i love the ease of which i can always have a small library in my pocket, i still like getting out a book every once in a while and turning pages and to my mind if even I, he is a notorious 'early adopter' of new technology will always go back to a real book. i seriously doubt many people will go ALL ebook.

i'm sure as more phone become PDA-like there will be a huge upsurge in ebook sales and ebook only releases but i don't think we're ever going to get rid of books, bookshops, libraries etc etc.

Cheers

Jock
lycadia
papamurphy wrote:
You don't get that sensational smell with e-books. It just isn't the same staring at a computer screen reading, then the actual page turning of paper books. I guess if we ever get to the technical future of VR book reading, with smell, texture, etc. Then perhaps it will take over, but until then I don't think Barnes and Noble will be going anywhere.


Since Barnes and Noble, along with Waldenbooks and most of the other book-mega-marts, do a decent online business in ebooks, even when it does happen, they won't neccessarily go anywhere.
I read a lot of ebooks on my PDA because it's easier to carry around and not really inconvient or eyestraining for me. If I had a tablet PC it would be even more idea.
However, I still find that there's nothing like a physical paper book, especially a musty old hardback, to really soothe one's soul. Still, we need to remember as we consider the future that unless people make active efforts to get thier kids just as emotionally invested in reading and in books in particular, then that warm fuzzy feeling we get holding a read book will never happen for them at all. They'll grow used to the digital format, to books that can be read and printed and read and reprinted, becuase the file -properly backed up- doesn't wear out and crack at the spine and leaf away one page at a time like books.
Still, that's just my thinking. Who knows what the future holds?
Olivia Wood
I read the majority of my literature on the computer, and seriously, you get used to it. If the book is good, I could probably be reading magic-marker on still-living elaphant hide and I probably wouldn't notice.

Which isn't to say I'm not half in love with my creamy, beautifully aged, minty-smelling (I used to keep my gum in it) hardback copy of Joseph Heller's Catch-22, or that I would ever even think of trading it for the digital version, but you really don't form that sort of attachment with most books, and that's when conveniance wins out.

And heck, it doesn't really matter how we feel about it. It won't be long before kids get their textbooks traded for laptops (and we'll all be happy about it - or at least the parents, not the chiropractors) and once they get used to it, I really doubt they'll see the value of lugging around paper bricks and flipping pages of text that doesn't change size or color or font. Kids are like that.

Books will still be around, sure, but in the way some people still have wood-burning fireplaces.

So it'll happen. Unless, of course, World War III comes around a lot sooner than expected, in which case there's nothing to worry about. Razz
drkarthi
I prefer book to ebook. Ebook is never the same as reading in hardcover. But i guess soon Ebooks will replace all Papers
raman
I prefer e-books cause first of all its much more convenient and secondly due to the fact that I find it easier to concentrate than reading a hard copy book.
Assiez
I perfer normal books to ebooks. I dislike reading so much text on the computer, not to mention that I just love the weight and feel of a real book. However I guess I could cope with reading a couple ebooks if they were on a tablet laptop if i needed that convieance.
Nikkori
I prefer to read in hardcopies than on computer monitor for the computer's radiation really hurts my eyes, and it consumes electricity. Unlike in the hard copies, you can read whenever and wherever you want...
OtakuBoi
I don't think eBooks will replace books, I think audiobooks will....

With the growing popularity of mp3 players, audiobooks have become more portable than ever... Personally, I think that looking at a screen and reading for hours is kinda boring, uncomfortable, etc. It's better to curl up in bed at 3 in the morning with a book :3
nskaushik
well ebooks have come a long way indeed...from people saying that they hate reading from the comp..it has come to a situation where they have all the comfort of flipping thru page..keeping tags..audio support and what not.....but then as is said pen and paper never will fade...Smile
angelussum
I would take hardcopy over e-book any day.

Reading is a whole experience that simply would not be complete without an actual book in your hands.

I'd argue that ebooks won't take over. You can probably digitalize a lot of things, but not books - and not any time soon.

Audiobooks have potential, but like people have argued, the whole concept of holding a book in your hands and flipping the pages makes the experience.
Shike
Being in the field of, well, books, I can tell you that there is a paradigm shift towards electronic resources, especially in the professional/sholarly publications areas. As for ebooks, I believe that there will be a decline in the number of books printed, but they will never cease to exist. Just look at the number of volumes in University/Research Libraries, such as Yale or the New York Public Library.
Ljsk
I doubt it.
zebrabongo
I like paperback editions of book just because I like to travel with books.

Although I enjoy the whole "book experience", I still might be OK with a PDA/PMP with an E-book reader.

In some aspects it might be better. Like somebody pointed out we would save natural resources and you can bring more books with you.

And it would be so easy to lend somebody your book (as long as the terms of purchase allows it....another discussion)
yau66
I remember reading a related short-story by Isaac Asimov. This was many years ago, so the details might not be very precise. Anyway, it was about a device that could store information, was very efficient energetically, could be read anywhere, even close to other people and still be private and was cheap to produce. It ended up being a book.

I prefer books over e-books. No doubt. I have never read fiction on e-books. Although searching is a nice feature in some cases, mostly non-fiction stuff but I every now and then wish I could search a book for a specific quote or part.
MythicalMuffin
I never minded reading short stories on the computer - in fact, I frequent sites like FictionPress for them, but a whole book? On a digital screen? I think not. I tend to read regular books for so long that I see afterimages of the text when I look up, so I doubt an e-book would be good for my already damaged eyes at all.

Plus, there's nothing quite like that old book smell.
Shike
Another reason I don't think that Books will die is that it is physically damaging to read on a computer screen for extended periods of time, which is what you would be doing. If this were to happen, then people would stop reading frequently and end up doing otherthings.

As a side note, quite a few Journals are moving to electronic formats, but most people in those fields, Print them after the most recent "issues" have been released.
Balthamos
I can never read a digital book. I think I suffer from what everyone else is suffering from; I need to have the book in my hands before my brain will immerse itself in the book. You just can't get that with a monitor.

~Balthamos
lycadia
Technically, reading a paper book is also physically damaging to the eyes if done for prolonged periods of time. At least that's what my eyedoctor tells me every time he changes my perscription. In fact, the ability to make any document a Large Print or Audiobook (through text to speech and other accessability features) are one of the big Bonuses to the digitalization of information. As for scholarly journals and other academic considerations, there's currently a small protest and petition going around my campus (or was before summer break) about the head of the library wanting to allocate too much of the budget to net.Library (I think that was the service... the one that's recently gone bankrupt, anyhow) and subscriptions to online editions of journals, rather then buying actual books and journals and to fixing or replacing the microfiche reader. We (the students) seem to have won that. He's got us a new microfiche reader and concieded that paying subscription fees for _access_ to information without getting a copy (be it paper or CD or digital and stored on the SCHOOLs not the Services server) was about as logical as buying magic beans. You're spending money, but get nothing that lasts nor any assurance that you'll continue to have access to what you paid for. Insanity, in my opinion. I won't even buy ebooks that have copy protection on them. I want the right to a back up, if I'm not going to have the real paper-in-hand asset itself. But that's a totally different tangent.
Just wanted to throw that out there for consideration.
Shike
lycadia wrote:
Technically, reading a paper book is also physically damaging to the eyes if done for prolonged periods of time. At least that's what my eyedoctor tells me every time he changes my perscription. In fact, the ability to make any document a Large Print or Audiobook (through text to speech and other accessability features) are one of the big Bonuses to the digitalization of information. As for scholarly journals and other academic considerations, there's currently a small protest and petition going around my campus (or was before summer break) about the head of the library wanting to allocate too much of the budget to net.Library (I think that was the service... the one that's recently gone bankrupt, anyhow) and subscriptions to online editions of journals, rather then buying actual books and journals and to fixing or replacing the microfiche reader. We (the students) seem to have won that. He's got us a new microfiche reader and concieded that paying subscription fees for _access_ to information without getting a copy (be it paper or CD or digital and stored on the SCHOOLs not the Services server) was about as logical as buying magic beans. You're spending money, but get nothing that lasts nor any assurance that you'll continue to have access to what you paid for. Insanity, in my opinion. I won't even buy ebooks that have copy protection on them. I want the right to a back up, if I'm not going to have the real paper-in-hand asset itself. But that's a totally different tangent.
Just wanted to throw that out there for consideration.


I'm not going to argue about anything you said, because, well, you aren't wrong. As an academic librarian I fully agree. The only problem comes with accessability. If we, as libraries, subscribe to online "full text" titles, those titles are accessable to all of our clientele, not just the ones who our on the particular campus where the physical items are kept. As a matter of fact the library I currently work for has a number of titles in both print and electronic.

As libraries, especially academic (read as College/University), move to electronic for journal subscriptions the question of accessability becomes less significat. Of course there are also certain disciplines who don't get most of their information from online, or even journal, sources. These would include disciplines such as Philosophy and Religion where most of the sources are in the form of books. Fewer books than journals are being digitized, though they are being digitized, and as such are needing the physical space in the libraries.

All of these issues require balance. Also notice, that generally the only way to search for any particular article you will need to refer to databases since most libraries don't have the time to catalog individual articles in their catalogs (online, print (like a book), or card). So a synthesis of online and print resources is ideal for any library, but both are needed in todays age, especially for academic/scholarly/professional research.

Also, it is true that most, if not all, libraries have a larger budget for electronic resources than print resources because they come at a higher price because of need and demand. If a library were to take it upon themselves to finance their own database for their journals, they would spend more in cataloging than they currently do for database subscriptions.
serazat
It's not really easy to read a long book by just sitting at your desk on a computer screen or bringing with an Ipod alwayas .You gotta feel the paper.It may sound funny but I always liked the smell of paper. And I like that feeling when I get a classic in my hands for example starting to read deeply.Besides it's less tiring for the eyes.
Tiger
I have read normal "print" books since I was in the first grade, and I really enjoy reading. I have also read e-books I have bought or downloaded off the Net.

I have to say that for me, both have their place. Nothing beats lying in bed on a cold day with a good book, or sitting in the living room on the sofa with a good book. On the other hand you cant do that at work for example, or in other places where an e-book is just more convenient.

The way things were going though, with most modern kids sitting in front of the TV, playing computer games etc., it's quite easy to see how e-books could replace print books, especially if professional handheld e-book readers are properly developed.

For my part though I find occassion to read both types and find them equally useful depending on the circumstances or situation. Where e-books will go in the future is anyone's guess, but if they go the handhelp, multimedia route, they may just become more popular to today's multi-media loving public.
Hojo
i dont read all too much, but i really doubt e-books will be replacing hardcopy books. whenever i read an e-book i couldnt read too long because i cant concentrate as much looking at the computer screen. the longer i read an e-book the more my eyes hurt and i gotta stop eventually.

when i read hardcopy books i dont have any of those problems, i can just read as long as i want without my eyes hurting. its also a lot nicer to have the book in your hands and being able to flip pages instead of just scrolling down all the time.
Nameless
Okay, I far prefer hard copy books, for three main reasons:

- Hard copy books are MUCH easier to read than reading the same text on the computer. That's pretty much undebatable.
- Hard copy books are MUCH more enjoyable to read than reading the same text on the computer. That is debatable, but in general most people prefer the hard copy.
- E-books are subject to all the usual computing problems: crashes, piracy and whatnot.

I don't think e-books are ever going to replace print books. I'm sure there will be a respectable market for them, but they're never going to completely dominate.
kiranaghor
I find it irritating to read books on computer. Conventional book reading itself is a great joy. E books will never never replace published books. We can take books to any place and enjoy reading them. I have stopped downloading them when i foung out that its the last thing one should do.
Bmucha
It's very difficult for me to concentrate on a text displayed on a computer monitor for a longer time. So e-books are not really an option for me and I don't expect they'll ever be. If e-books ever seem to start replacing paper ones, I guess I'll try and set up an "after-market" business, printing paper copies from e-books. If there are any more readers like myself (and I guess there are) such a business should become a success Smile
Varo
Ebooks tend to hurt my eyes after awhile. Also im not as comfortable sitting at my computer desk for long periods of time. I feel far more comfortable lounging around various places around my house. I also like the covers of real books and something physical (holding it in your hands). I even enjoy the rustling sound the pages make. It all just seems to make storys seem more real. An ebook on the otherhand is just a chunk of data displayed on a monitor.
Dean_The_Great
E-books are fine if you want the ability to search for quotes and such like that. But agree with Varo and others that it's just an uncomfortable way of doing it.

Also, there is definitely something to be said for the weight, feel and smell of the book. I love reading books that have already been read (used books, or older books from the library), because you can get a sense of the story being told to many. It's weird, but I'm sure some people will understand.
Nevman
Could e-books ever replace physical books? I would have to argue, yes.

I'm an avid reader, and have been as long as I can remember. My favourite authors, as of the moment, are Steven Erikson and Robert Jordan (along with Terry Pratchett for the more comic element), and I can quite happily devour one of their books over a weekend - lying in bed at night or lounging in a armchair by a window during the day. I get caught up in the stories and lives of the characters, losing all track of time.

For me, as I see with so many others above, nothing beats a physical book in your hands, turning the pages one by one as the story unfolds. But then that's what I've grown up with. That is the reading experience for me, the gateway into another world.

I've only read a couple of e-books, having heard before and been put off by many of the sentiments expressed above. There is too much glare - white's are too white, black's too bright. You can't move from the chair you're sitting in, unless you've got a portable device.

I have to admit though, I still enjoyed reading the books, despite them being in e-book form. I played with the settings of my monitor to reduce the glare, and didn't read for quite as long as I would have normally without a break. The experience was still enjoyable, and with more dedicated equipment I believe it could become the norm.

The problem with e-books at the moment is that it's still new, with a fairly small following. As the technology evolves with dedicated e-book platforms (electronic devices who's main purpose is to display e-books) and screens made more comfortable for long hours of reading, I can quite easily see e-books taking the place of physical books.

The benefits of such a technology are easy to see. The ability to carry a whole library of books in the physical space required for just one. To be able to change the font, text-size and brightness of the pages to suit any reader. No longer will you need an external light to read at night, or a bookmark to hold your place. You could search your entire collection for a quote that's been driving you mad, and presumably, when computer translation catches up, you'd be able to change the language of the book at whim.

For those of us that have grown up with physical books, making the change to e-books would never be easy. There's simply too much history, too many memories tied up in those collections of bound pages. But for the generations growing up now, where they have the choice . . . I don't see our old friends maintaining their grip over the hearts of generations to come.
ItsWesley
I have never really tried to read an E-book, but I think for now I would prefer books, mainly because reading on a moniter screen strains your eyes.
I've heard that some companies are developing like paperthin LCD ink thingys, which would be like paper, that can display text and images.
I think that if they made one that didn't strain your eyes then they would be great, especially if you could carry them around like books, but with more than one book on.
sarapicoazul
Ebooks are environmentally preferable. The paper industry is very pollutant. Even recycling has its environmental costs. Ebooks are also more portable in the physical sense. You can store an ebook on your pendrive , CD or DVD. Despite these facts i should honestly say that i myself prefer paper books. I enjoy the touch and smell of paper namely the recycled paper. I also think that reading ebooks on the computer screen is much more agressive for the eyes than paper. Ordinary books are much more confortable to read.
Shike
Dean_The_Great wrote:
E-books are fine if you want the ability to search for quotes and such like that. But agree with Varo and others that it's just an uncomfortable way of doing it.

Also, there is definitely something to be said for the weight, feel and smell of the book. I love reading books that have already been read (used books, or older books from the library), because you can get a sense of the story being told to many. It's weird, but I'm sure some people will understand.


Believe me. I completely understand this. I'm kinda stuck between the Computer Generation and the Older Generations (in a way) I grew up during the 80's and early 90's and as such didn't have a computer with a hard drive till I was in High School. I'm proficient with computers (and much to my chagrin am becoming more familiar with programming) I much prefer print materials to Electronic materials, though, speaking from a librarian point of view, Electronic resources are more available to your clientelle than print resources are.

But, I think (and a good number of librarians agree) that print resources will not completely fade away.
TrueFact
Hardcopy will remain for along time for sure but I don't think for ever. I remember that PC Magazine (Middle East Edition) made a research about it and found that most people will use hardcopies not digital ones or ebooks and found also the paper production increased in the last few years indicating more puplished hardcopies of existing books and new books. But there was around 25% who said they will use ebooks and PDAs as they can handle large amounts of text and books in small size (How many CDs an Encyclopedia needs?). For me, almost every book I read or buy is an ebook. Why is that? because I shop, and pay and read them on my notebook which is going with me everywhere I go to.
Jupernia
I have tired a few ebooks and they were ok. But I prefer to have the hard copy books right in front of me. I don't mind reading ebooks from a computer, but I like to read while taking bubble baths, and that is kinda hard to do with a computer. I would recommend E-Books to people who have to travel around alot.
dbaker6165
Does audio books count as a "hard copy"? I mean, I like to read on the computer or lcd screen but I usually find myself half asleep and not comprehending what I have read. As for paperback books, well, I hate the "feel" of paper in general (I know it is a stupid reason but what can I say... I hate it!) So what I have come to realize that I can retain much information from a book if someone is telling me the story. I do not think it is too strange because throughout history, most stories were told by word of mouth.
lycadia
Shike wrote:
lycadia wrote:
Technically, reading a paper book is also physically damaging to the eyes if done for prolonged periods of time. At least that's what my eyedoctor tells me every time he changes my perscription. In fact, the ability to make any document a Large Print or Audiobook (through text to speech and other accessability features) are one of the big Bonuses to the digitalization of information. As for scholarly journals and other academic considerations, there's currently a small protest and petition going around my campus (or was before summer break) about the head of the library wanting to allocate too much of the budget to net.Library (I think that was the service... the one that's recently gone bankrupt, anyhow) and subscriptions to online editions of journals, rather then buying actual books and journals and to fixing or replacing the microfiche reader. We (the students) seem to have won that. He's got us a new microfiche reader and concieded that paying subscription fees for _access_ to information without getting a copy (be it paper or CD or digital and stored on the SCHOOLs not the Services server) was about as logical as buying magic beans. You're spending money, but get nothing that lasts nor any assurance that you'll continue to have access to what you paid for. Insanity, in my opinion. I won't even buy ebooks that have copy protection on them. I want the right to a back up, if I'm not going to have the real paper-in-hand asset itself. But that's a totally different tangent.
Just wanted to throw that out there for consideration.


I'm not going to argue about anything you said, because, well, you aren't wrong. As an academic librarian I fully agree. The only problem comes with accessability. If we, as libraries, subscribe to online "full text" titles, those titles are accessable to all of our clientele, not just the ones who our on the particular campus where the physical items are kept. As a matter of fact the library I currently work for has a number of titles in both print and electronic.

As libraries, especially academic (read as College/University), move to electronic for journal subscriptions the question of accessability becomes less significat. Of course there are also certain disciplines who don't get most of their information from online, or even journal, sources. These would include disciplines such as Philosophy and Religion where most of the sources are in the form of books. Fewer books than journals are being digitized, though they are being digitized, and as such are needing the physical space in the libraries.

All of these issues require balance. Also notice, that generally the only way to search for any particular article you will need to refer to databases since most libraries don't have the time to catalog individual articles in their catalogs (online, print (like a book), or card). So a synthesis of online and print resources is ideal for any library, but both are needed in todays age, especially for academic/scholarly/professional research.

Also, it is true that most, if not all, libraries have a larger budget for electronic resources than print resources because they come at a higher price because of need and demand. If a library were to take it upon themselves to finance their own database for their journals, they would spend more in cataloging than they currently do for database subscriptions.



You've raised a lot of very good points that I hadn't considered at all and I thank you for it. You have changed my thinking, which, since I was already very fond of use of digital resources is really saying something. In my particular case, however, the problem was with lack of balance. Having no useable microfishe and microfilm readers was making what might well have been hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of regularly if not popularly used material unavailable to the history students, especially the Native American Studies students, who had very little other access to the infomation they needed. There was also a great deal of money being spent on completely nonacademic things like putting in soft drink fridges and snack food racks for a "library cafe" by the check out desk and big leather sofas that encourage more people to sit around and chat then to curl up with a good book for some reason. It just had an overall feel of the director of the library not really wanting to enhance the effectiveness of the library so much as to tempt in more warm bodies, even at the expense of the people trying to gain knowledge. So I suppose that had my hackles up a bit.
Again, thank you for pointing out to me some salient aspects of the actual library science I hadn't considered or been fully aware of.
RT Cunningham
E-books have already replaced paper books in many aspects of our society. Most technical manuals for computer components, for example, are some form of e-book.

I believe e-books will totally replace informational books of every kind. I do NOT believe that e-books will replace novels. They may have an e-book version, but it won't be the only version.

I think e-books will have to eventually replace novels that are out of print or hard to find. I looked for one book for two years, in libraries, bookstores, and online sources and never did find a copy. An e-book would have saved the day.
Manofgames
Quote:
E-books have already replaced paper books in many aspects of our society. Most technical manuals for computer components, for example, are some form of e-book.

I believe e-books will totally replace informational books of every kind. I do NOT believe that e-books will replace novels. They may have an e-book version, but it won't be the only version.

I think e-books will have to eventually replace novels that are out of print or hard to find. I looked for one book for two years, in libraries, bookstores, and online sources and never did find a copy. An e-book would have saved the day.


I think that E-books might completely replace things like manuals, etc. but unless they find a way to view them 'off-line' so to speak, where you can actually hold the book in your hand, it wont work.

Too many distractions at a computer.

There is a book, can't remember what its called, something like eden or the last eden. Its written by a comedian.

Anyway, in the book they have e-books but they read them on a device made Like a book, but made of fibre optics.

That might work.

I do prefer books though because you can just immerse yourself in it, so to speak with no other distractions......
medievalman26
Of course e books are not going to replace normal books. You just can't replace that feeling of actually holding a real book in your hand. If it does eventually happen I do not want to be around to see it happen. I have tons of books and think that it is important for everyone to at least read a book or two for fun every once in a while. If you don't feel like you enjoy reading then why the heck are you posting on forums. (that involves some reading) I know for a fact that e books are harder to actually read because you can't "turn the page" or actually close the book and put a bookmarker in it (or for some of us fold a corner) to hold your place. I know that most of you agree that sometimes it is just easier to read a normal version of a book than trying to go through an e book. Can you imagine having to read a textbook for school as an e book? That would be...frikin torture(well more torturous than having an actual textbook to throw against the wall in frustration).
Coclus
Maybe it ll happen one day.. but i doubt it...
gyaneshwar
I like idea that we are saving trees with reading e-books. That's of course if I do not think about waste my computer/PDA/reader will make when it becomes obsolete.

Generally I do not mind e-books or papers but I DO mind DRM(digital rights management) thing. Every time I change my computer I am not able to read my magazine or book. That just s..s.

And book you can give to anybody or even sell it. E-book? With DRM? I doubt. Specially when the prices of e-books and books differ for 1 $.
Manofgames
medievalman26 wrote:
Of course e books are not going to replace normal books. You just can't replace that feeling of actually holding a real book in your hand. If it does eventually happen I do not want to be around to see it happen. I have tons of books and think that it is important for everyone to at least read a book or two for fun every once in a while. If you don't feel like you enjoy reading then why the heck are you posting on forums. (that involves some reading) I know for a fact that e books are harder to actually read because you can't "turn the page" or actually close the book and put a bookmarker in it (or for some of us fold a corner) to hold your place. I know that most of you agree that sometimes it is just easier to read a normal version of a book than trying to go through an e book. Can you imagine having to read a textbook for school as an e book? That would be...frikin torture(well more torturous than having an actual textbook to throw against the wall in frustration).


that's what i was trying to say in my post, what if you actually had a book made out of fibre optics that u could read e-books through
Weslyn
sarapicoazul wrote:
Ebooks are environmentally preferable. The paper industry is very pollutant. Even recycling has its environmental costs. Ebooks are also more portable in the physical sense. You can store an ebook on your pendrive , CD or DVD. Despite these facts i should honestly say that i myself prefer paper books. I enjoy the touch and smell of paper namely the recycled paper. I also think that reading ebooks on the computer screen is much more agressive for the eyes than paper. Ordinary books are much more confortable to read.


Two words: Synthetic. Paper.

Yes, we all want to do what's good for the environment, and synthetic paper is highly sustainable. There are books now on the market made from synthetic paper - not to worry - while it may not have that book smell per se, it feels like regular paper, looks like regular paper, and is waterproof and tear-proof.

So I highly doubt that e-books will be replacing paper books. Synthetic paper books will be replacing tree-paper books instead. ^_~

If you’re interested in finding out about synthetic paper, YUPO is prolly the most eco-friendly brand out there. Or at least that’s what my research tells me.
tuncay
I think some kind of an ebook is necessary to replace the current schema, since paper is sucking the trees like crazy. But I have to admit that, I don't think it's today's technology, which will succeed in doing so.

The reason is, today's screens are emitting enough light to tire you (and your eyes) out, makes you lose concentration and such.

I'm sure one day paper books will be obsolete, but that's not close as far as I can tell.
Weslyn
tuncay wrote:
I think some kind of an ebook is necessary to replace the current schema, since paper is sucking the trees like crazy.


(Sometimes I feel like I'm being totally overlooked.)

True, the current use of tree-paper books is just plain bad. I can't tell you how much paper I see being used in a day with little chance of being recycled. On the other hand, the over use of computer screens is proven to be harmful to eyesight. LCD screens are the worst. And unfortunately, synthetic paper isn't quite to the point where it's as affordable as tree-paper. We seem to be in a middle stage of progression. It's just coming along slowly... very slowly.

Something should be done, because I don't think ebooks are the answer.
medievalman26
Manofgames wrote:
medievalman26 wrote:
Of course e books are not going to replace normal books. You just can't replace that feeling of actually holding a real book in your hand. If it does eventually happen I do not want to be around to see it happen. I have tons of books and think that it is important for everyone to at least read a book or two for fun every once in a while. If you don't feel like you enjoy reading then why the heck are you posting on forums. (that involves some reading) I know for a fact that e books are harder to actually read because you can't "turn the page" or actually close the book and put a bookmarker in it (or for some of us fold a corner) to hold your place. I know that most of you agree that sometimes it is just easier to read a normal version of a book than trying to go through an e book. Can you imagine having to read a textbook for school as an e book? That would be...frikin torture(well more torturous than having an actual textbook to throw against the wall in frustration).


that's what i was trying to say in my post, what if you actually had a book made out of fibre optics that u could read e-books through


I still would prefer to have a normal book over what you have suggested I just do not like the feel of e-books. They seem impersonal, as I said before nothing can truly replace the feel of a real book and turning the pages. I do know that in the far distant future it might happen but not during my life time(I hope). Even though that may or may not happen there will still be hard copy books because I am sure that back when people started to use paperback books people said they are not going to replace hardcover books. It is the same situation now with the e-books. They will eventually end up coexisting. There will be compromises and what not. I do feel strongly about this topic because I read a lot of books and am actually trying to write one. Here is a hint I actually have a website made to help people improve their writing skills.
billys
Dean_The_Great wrote:
E-books are fine if you want the ability to search for quotes and such like that. But agree with Varo and others that it's just an uncomfortable way of doing it.

Also, there is definitely something to be said for the weight, feel and smell of the book. I love reading books that have already been read (used books, or older books from the library), because you can get a sense of the story being told to many. It's weird, but I'm sure some people will understand.


Really nice feeling indeed. I agree with most of you guys and I hope and believe that hardcore books won't be replaced by e-books.
ck88
I have been reading eBooks on my Palm for two years and noticed the following:
    I prefer to read shorter books on the palm and longer ones in paper.
    I tend to skip uninteresting pasages on my palm but never do that in a real book.
    You don't need to switch on the lights for nighttime reading with the palm.
    But you might run out of power.
    With my palm I always carry an eBook and some music.
okullar
e-books are pretty good but the taste of hardcopies cannot be changable...
Weslyn
okullar wrote:
e-books are pretty good but the taste of hardcopies cannot be changable...


Ha ha, either your english isn't very good, or you like to eat books. (laughs).
Sorry, I found this amusing even though it prolly shouldn't be.
Keran
I really doubt it. In my case i never liked reading E-Books, mostly cuz there are like 100 other things i can do while using my computer, all are more interesting then reading a book.
And ofcourse reading a normal hardcover book has a special athmosphere or something like that, you can feel it, focus better and the most important save your eyes from looking straight at a computer screen from close.
medievalman26
Keran wrote:
I really doubt it. In my case i never liked reading E-Books, mostly cuz there are like 100 other things i can do while using my computer, all are more interesting then reading a book.
And ofcourse reading a normal hardcover book has a special athmosphere or something like that, you can feel it, focus better and the most important save your eyes from looking straight at a computer screen from close.


Exactly, I agree it is sometimes harder to read an ebook because you are straining your eyes to read them. I tried a couple of e-books myself and found that I get destracted by other things on my computer or sometimes they have banners or ads and I just hate that so I just stop reading them. It does seem better to have an actual book that you can turn the pages and get emersed in it.
JoseRizal
i agree that e-book will and should eventually phase out hard copies.
  • no trees to kill
  • space savings (i had 5 big luggages full of paperbacks when i donated them)
  • the sheer convenience alone of having a library with you everywhere you go
in the beginning i had to force myself to like reading ebooks, but it took no time to adapt to it.
in school, while my classmates are lugging huge volumes around, i carry my class ebooks in my pda Laughing
funstuff1501
I have tried reading the ebooks, but its just not the same. I use a Treo 650 and the text is nice and readable, but it is a pain trying to read and flip pages all the time. The biggest problem I have is that I am a cheapskate, and I hate paying for a book that I am going to read once, maybe twice. I prefer to go to the library and browse the books I like, check them out, read them and return them for the low low price of free
nootherone
it believe that when pleasure-reading, most people always prefer to have a physical page-turner. the sensation of the pages, the smell of the cover, the look of the font, all make for a uniquely summersive experience that simpy cannot be simulated by any flat-monitored e-reader.
E-books find their place in the analytical read, where the search function is indeed a blessing. While the ebook may come to replace paper little by little, the good ol' fashion book will always be highly regarded
jeromep
I vote for E-Book.

The pros? Accessibility, no need to go to libraries or bookstores, just make a Google/Froogle search, select, hit checkout, and viola, its there in your doorstep. Cheap, e-books are alot cheaper than physical books. Storage, imagine storing a thousand books in your bedroom, whereas you can fit them in your laptop.

The cons? Readability, its hard for me to read and write notes using e-books.

But I can't wait til Google's next move in their goal of organizing the world's information - which includes books.
kevin briggs
e-books are ok but u have to sit in front of the monitor or lcd and your eyes can get sore after a while and i dont think that hard copy books or paper back books can hurt your eyes as much
biedr0na666
as for me, there's no problem with reading books from the screen. i don't have to flip the pages, i can lean on my armchair and just have a screen in front of me.
what is more, i have a 17" crt screen, working in high resolution, but only 85Hz. but i find that comfortable. no problems with my eyes at all! i can stare at the screen for ages, but my eyesight is as sharp as it always used to be. hardly believeable, huh? i guess i'm the lucky guy:)
maybe that's because my eyes have already got so used to screens (Atari 130 with green-coloured monitor, then pegasus, then my first pc with 14" screen doing 800x600 at 75Hz..... and i have spent a huge bit of my early life playing games... too much.... should have been playing with girls instead LOL)

anyway, e-books are alternative to hardcopy, especially now when good screens are nicer and cheaper. this goes together.
MYP415
yea I don't think ebooks can ever replace traditional books for two reasons. First, it would be much nmore strenuous on the eyes to read on the computer and if one doesn't have a laptop it maybe difficult to sit at a desk reading for hours. It would be much more comfortable to read in a place like your bed or sofa. My second reason is a lot fo people use reading to relax and relieve stress and sitting at a computer won't really help with that because its not really relaxing (in my opinion) opposed to other places. Although I don't think books will be replaced by ebooks I DO think that newspapers will eventually get replaced (or atleast the popularity will go drastically down) because newspapers and magazine articles are a lot shorter than book so it may not be as bad. Plus for news a lot of sites like cnn also have videos on their site along with the articles so you can watch some news and read about it also.
carlospro7
reading from a screen has a different feeling than reading from a book. While I spend a lot of time in front of a computer, it's really nice to sometimes read from paper. Doubtful that ebooks will replace hardcopy. I'm sure most people feel so
jeromep
MYP415 wrote:
...I DO think that newspapers will eventually get replaced...


Hey. Yeah. I think likewise.

I prefer reading a hardcopy book rather than an electronic book. But when it comes to newspapers, its the other way around.

I hate newspapers for 3 reasons:
1. Hard to read because of those big old pages
2. Black and white.. No, black text in gray background.
3. I don't read all sections in the newspaper

In contrast, news in the internet are already formatted, comes with a search function, and its interactive.

But in anycase, this is not the topic Smile I just had a realization with the quoted post.
budiman
For studying I prefer hardcopy compared to softcopy. Firstly, I am not used to stare on monitor and easily get headache when using computer for a long time. Secondly I love reading while laying on bed or sitting on my nice arm chair with my leg up.

However ebook is cheaper, and can be found easily on net. I live in a village and most of the books are difficult to get or buy. So ebook is a very good solusion for my condition.
masqued_dreams
I've tried reading Ebooks, but i always end up having to print it out or just stop reading because i can't sit there and stare at a computer screen for long periods of time. It strains my eyes. They're more trouble than they're worth, in my opinion.
damiankrol
Personally I think ebooks are great. But the best pleasure is to lay down in a bad, open a hardcopy book, and read till the sun rises at 4:30 a.m. ;)

There are two things which are the the advantages of ebooks:
1. they weigh nothing (not counting your laptop ;) ),
2. there is always CTRL+F shortcut... hate looking for sth through printed text.

Despite these, printed books have the spirit.
marcmgeronimo
I guess I am one of those people who would read a book in e-book form and at the same time buy the actual book for my own collection. I do not think the electronic books can replace the actual book well at least not in the near future this is because i guess real books are a lot cheaper (compared to the electronic needs of having an electronic book) and it is more convenient and easy to read.
welshsteve
I much prefer to have a book next to the computer for referncing. I don't think e-books will ever replace hard copy.
catscratches
Hardcopys are much better to read. E-books doesn't give you the feeling at all. No, it'll always be hardcopy books for me.
magneto_ms
yeah..currently ebooks don't compare in reading comfort as to paper books. It just doesin't feel the same.

But beware ! These new organic LED papers are under research. when they come out, you would just have a normal sheet like paper that you can fold and keep in your pocket, but it could as well download the latest stuff from internet and show it to you. you could read whole ebooks from thos itself !
Crazy_Canuck
I'm heartened to see that even here, in this online forum, most readers prefer hard copy books.

I have never attempted to read an e-book. I am guilty of being a margin-writer in my books (well, they're mine dammit! I'm allowed!). It's my English degree ... hard to get away from the habit of being a critical reader.

Someone up there ^ mentioned audiobooks as another option. This is another tough one for me as I am about a 99.9% visual learner. I can't take information in auditorily; find it very difficult to understand and process. Although there is something very appealing about listening to an author read from his/her own work -- but then, only in short snippets where there is discussion around it of the process of writing.

The only things of significance that I read online are newspapers. I do feel for the traditional newspaper, as I think they are going the way of the do-do bird. Too much cost involved, especially national newspaper distribution networks. Yikes.
Warriorza
Though I don't like it to happen, I'm afraid new generations will read on their computers most of the time. Of course there is one advantage: Less trees have to be cut for making paper for these books. I don't know if this would be of great difference, but every small bits help.

I think that in about 50 years you have bookstores and bookcases filled with CD-Roms!

EDIT: Books will be easier to copy when they are written on disks!
medievalman26
Warriorza wrote:
Though I don't like it to happen, I'm afraid new generations will read on their computers most of the time. Of course there is one advantage: Less trees have to be cut for making paper for these books. I don't know if this would be of great difference, but every small bits help.

I think that in about 50 years you have bookstores and bookcases filled with CD-Roms!

EDIT: Books will be easier to copy when they are written on disks!


I really hope you are wrong because if you are correct then we will have a whole generation with bad eyes. I know it is very bad for your eyes toi be at a computer screen all day. Having only ebooks (at least for me) will take all the fun out of reading. Plus unless the develop something like in Star Trek where you carry it around you would be only able to use a laptop or computer to read. That would kind of suck. You would have to have a computer and of course power just to read a book. So You may be right but we are at least 80-100 years away from something that would make it portable to read a ebooks and also feesable monetary wise.
zjosie729
I would definitely prefer actual books over e-books. They hurt my eyes. But if ebooks are free, and actual books are not, I'll take them nevertheless.
xyberz
Technology will evolve, maybe in ways that you'd never think of, that will most likely make E-Books a regular everyday thing in the near future.

Why?

Well I'll list some very valid reasons why it books WILL eventually all become e-books, besides those already in print, in the near future.

1. Trees, it takes trees to make books and magazines. The amount of books today compared to just 50 years ago is completely staggering! It seems everyone wants to write something nowadays, and everyone is rushing to print a copy of it. Because we're not the green loving people we should all be, I doubt that we'll ever replant enough trees to replace what we use. So something will have to be done otherwise this earth will be bare desert or winter tundras.

2. Given that we can expect new technology to come out, reading e-books will eventually be better for you than reading good old fashion paperback books. I mean your eyes will no longer be strained through long hours of reading, or at least be cut back to a minimum, and you'll enjoy reading more because of it.

3. Faster production and distribution. If you have really important information that you needed to get into the hands of others who really need it, what would be the fastest way? Snail mail and a 5 pound paperweight? I don't think so. You can now get that information in your hands in just minutes over the internet and you can choose to print out any important sections that you feel may be of value to you. I mean you probably don't need EVERY word in any book out there, so why not help save some trees?

4. Easier to carry. Wow, do you think you'd be able to carry 100 books in your backpack? I don't think so, at least not with the old fashion way. I think that many backs would be saved through all those years of schooling if we carried one simple device that holds all the books we would ever need instead of trying to physically carry them all yourselves.

These are just a few of the very MANY reasons why e-books will most definitely replace regular books in the future.

Also might I say that most people spend hours on end reading information off of a computer screen, so why not off an E-Book tablet? It's not very different. And like I said, with technology advancing the way it is, it'll be like reading everything else you look at on the internet and your computer.

So it's not a matter of "If", it's a matter of "When". To think that it will not turn out to be this way is pure foolishness as it will benefit us in every way with pretty much no downside.

The only real downside that would be the thorn in the side, is the issue of piracy. Unfortunately that is a real issue that all book writers will eventually have to deal with. But hey, aren't all things on the computer subject to piracy in one way or another? So it's not something that would only be limited to E-Books.

Lastly, the only real reason why paper books will be around in the future is for pure nostalgic reasons. The feeling of cracking open a book, the smell that they accumulate after long years on the shelves, and the feeling of the pages rustling through your fingertips. Those will be the only things holding paper books around for as long as they will be.
ddukki
You can't get the same meaning from E-Books that you can from regular books. There's nothing physical and captivating about a virtual plane of pixel points and lights. E-books may have the edge in the sense that you can search through it more easily, but the whole concept of casual reading is lost.
JC Vincent Pelletero
E books are good but it makes my eyes tired. Well why don't we try printing ebooks? But i guess its illegal.

xyberz wrote:
Technology will evolve, maybe in ways that you'd never think of, that will most likely make E-Books a regular everyday thing in the near future.

Why?

Well I'll list some very valid reasons why it books WILL eventually all become e-books, besides those already in print, in the near future.

1. Trees, it takes trees to make books and magazines. The amount of books today compared to just 50 years ago is completely staggering! It seems everyone wants to write something nowadays, and everyone is rushing to print a copy of it. Because we're not the green loving people we should all be, I doubt that we'll ever replant enough trees to replace what we use. So something will have to be done otherwise this earth will be bare desert or winter tundras.

2. Given that we can expect new technology to come out, reading e-books will eventually be better for you than reading good old fashion paperback books. I mean your eyes will no longer be strained through long hours of reading, or at least be cut back to a minimum, and you'll enjoy reading more because of it.

3. Faster production and distribution. If you have really important information that you needed to get into the hands of others who really need it, what would be the fastest way? Snail mail and a 5 pound paperweight? I don't think so. You can now get that information in your hands in just minutes over the internet and you can choose to print out any important sections that you feel may be of value to you. I mean you probably don't need EVERY word in any book out there, so why not help save some trees?

4. Easier to carry. Wow, do you think you'd be able to carry 100 books in your backpack? I don't think so, at least not with the old fashion way. I think that many backs would be saved through all those years of schooling if we carried one simple device that holds all the books we would ever need instead of trying to physically carry them all yourselves.

These are just a few of the very MANY reasons why e-books will most definitely replace regular books in the future.

Also might I say that most people spend hours on end reading information off of a computer screen, so why not off an E-Book tablet? It's not very different. And like I said, with technology advancing the way it is, it'll be like reading everything else you look at on the internet and your computer.

So it's not a matter of "If", it's a matter of "When". To think that it will not turn out to be this way is pure foolishness as it will benefit us in every way with pretty much no downside.

The only real downside that would be the thorn in the side, is the issue of piracy. Unfortunately that is a real issue that all book writers will eventually have to deal with. But hey, aren't all things on the computer subject to piracy in one way or another? So it's not something that would only be limited to E-Books.

Lastly, the only real reason why paper books will be around in the future is for pure nostalgic reasons. The feeling of cracking open a book, the smell that they accumulate after long years on the shelves, and the feeling of the pages rustling through your fingertips. Those will be the only things holding paper books around for as long as they will be.



Very good point. Well everyone has his own point. I also agree with you. But as of now, it strained my eyes while reading ebooks. Its good to save trees.
medievalman26
If anyone plays D&D you already know how much trouble it is with the online books for it so I still don't think that (in my lifetime anyway) ebooks will replace hard copies as the general medium for books.
kmvinodkm
E books are fine only for reference.
But If we want to enjoy reading there comes
Print version
welshsteve
I've already said this, but I prefer hard copy books than e-books. I suppose for quick reference they are ok, but I still prefer to hold the book in my hand. Computer screens are hard on the eye, so are not a viable long term alternative I don't think. At least until computer screens are easier to look at for long periods of time.
kany
Well i think it will happen . Time never remains the same Where were computers and mobiles and such things but now they are in our necessities and we just can't imagine to be without them . I don't think that books would become scarce but as we can see that many people now read ebooks with the palms and readers and i think as technology advances there would be better readers that wouldn't strain your sight and i think yes that digital readers would replace books.
oleszka
hades9366 wrote:
I've tried reading a few e-books but I've always given up. I just don't like looking at digitised text when I'm reading a novel. I like the feel, the weight and even the smell of books but I can see the sense of switching to digital text. For one thing they'd be cheaper to release, meaning the author should get to keep more of the royalties. There's also the forests we'd theoretically be saving. So what do you think? Will e-books ever replace hardcopy books?


I like hardcopy books and I think they will be forever (at least for long long time)... I use e-book just on mobile (smartphone) if I can't find or buy hardcopy... but to read e-books on computer it makes my eyes tired fast...
roboguyspacedude
I like reading the text of a hard copy and I like being able to find where I left off. Also, as currently laptops are pretty much not allowed in my school at the time and neither are electronics I prefer to have something that I can actually use at school.
Telnven
I don't think hard-copies of books will ever get replaced by their digital counterparts, I personally have tried reading digital copies of novels with no avail.

xyberz wrote:
Technology will evolve, maybe in ways that you'd never think of, that will most likely make E-Books a regular everyday thing in the near future.

Why?

Well I'll list some very valid reasons why it books WILL eventually all become e-books, besides those already in print, in the near future.

1. Trees, it takes trees to make books and magazines. The amount of books today compared to just 50 years ago is completely staggering! It seems everyone wants to write something nowadays, and everyone is rushing to print a copy of it. Because we're not the green loving people we should all be, I doubt that we'll ever replant enough trees to replace what we use. So something will have to be done otherwise this earth will be bare desert or winter tundras.

2. Given that we can expect new technology to come out, reading e-books will eventually be better for you than reading good old fashion paperback books. I mean your eyes will no longer be strained through long hours of reading, or at least be cut back to a minimum, and you'll enjoy reading more because of it.

3. Faster production and distribution. If you have really important information that you needed to get into the hands of others who really need it, what would be the fastest way? Snail mail and a 5 pound paperweight? I don't think so. You can now get that information in your hands in just minutes over the internet and you can choose to print out any important sections that you feel may be of value to you. I mean you probably don't need EVERY word in any book out there, so why not help save some trees?
4. Easier to carry. Wow, do you think you'd be able to carry 100 books in your backpack? I don't think so, at least not with the old fashion way. I think that many backs would be saved through all those years of schooling if we carried one simple device that holds all the books we would ever need instead of trying to physically carry them all yourselves.

These are just a few of the very MANY reasons why e-books will most definitely replace regular books in the future.

Also might I say that most people spend hours on end reading information off of a computer screen, so why not off an E-Book tablet? It's not very different. And like I said, with technology advancing the way it is, it'll be like reading everything else you look at on the internet and your computer.

So it's not a matter of "If", it's a matter of "When". To think that it will not turn out to be this way is pure foolishness as it will benefit us in every way with pretty much no downside.

The only real downside that would be the thorn in the side, is the issue of piracy. Unfortunately that is a real issue that all book writers will eventually have to deal with. But hey, aren't all things on the computer subject to piracy in one way or another? So it's not something that would only be limited to E-Books.

Lastly, the only real reason why paper books will be around in the future is for pure nostalgic reasons. The feeling of cracking open a book, the smell that they accumulate after long years on the shelves, and the feeling of the pages rustling through your fingertips. Those will be the only things holding paper books around for as long as they will be.


I think you have made some very valid points in your above post, but I always remember scholars telling us that in the future (by now actually) computers would be doing everyday tasks to a far greater extent than they actually are doing, although again I think you have covered almost every reason why they will become the books of the future – so thank you for your evaluation of the argument (even if it was a tad biased),
slasonic
Oh, yes they will replace them. Just a matter of time. some solution to eye strain is required, however. whoever does that will be rich
sambhav
I do have a number of ebooks but dont like to sit in front of my computer and read them. I prefer the hard copy instead.
iNs@nE
Hard Copy...Cant strain my eyes off just for reading a book on teh comp..
Master Yoda
Anyhow, most of the time I'm on my computer, so I really don't have a problem reading e-books.. but if I'm tired I'd prefer hard copy.. coz I can just snuggle into my bed and read it .... so, I say it depends on my mood... but still, hard copy is better... coz if you want to relax while reading a book, that's the way to do it.. but I'd normally go for e-books.. coz they stop me from falling asleep while reading.. whereas while reading hard copies.. more often than not, I fall asleep .. Embarassed Razz
onlybooks
for easy reading hard copy of book is must i mean to say that its easy to read a book in the form of hard copy rather than being attached to your computer full time. while it is easy to search a content in ebook and we can find a particular thing easy in ebook rather than hard copy. So, i think both are right at there places.
azbuky
I prefer reading a book, rather than an e-book. It's the way I was used to, since I was a little kid and it's healthier for my eyes and it's something else to read holding a real book than holding a computer in your arms. Unfortunately, e-books are spreading more and more these days and even Google started scanning every book in the world... In a way, it could be useful, because you can find faster what you are looking for. For example, the official documents or some computer books are useful on the computer. I usually use e-books when studying for school, because there aren't many fine books in stores.
medievalman26
I still don't like ebooks they are too hard to use and it hurts my eyes so definitely no on that again. I will say more next week.
Lessien
Well, I also prefer real books above e-books but in some cases those e-books can be really handy.
I am a big d&d player and I don’t know if anyone else who posted here plays it but that game does require a lot of books. First of all you need 3 basic books: players handbook, dungeon master guide and the monster manual. But that is only basic, if you want to create a proper character, you need even more books. And they aren’t really what you would call light weight books either. So for those books I use my e-books and my faithful laptop. the laptop isn’t that heavy as an entire pile of books. But that are the only e-books I actually have.
I’m a bookbinder of profession so maybe I’m even more fond of real books but you have to admit there is nothing more fun that sitting underneath a tree, reading a book, shifting though pages and just the feel of the paper and the weight in your hand.
The books I make are then not just a paperback or a hardcover but books with a leather cover and all. That adds then the smell of the leather. Not to mention the pleasure it gives when you see a book appear under your very own hands. You have put the pages together, sew them, made the cover and in the end you have a lovely book.
True most books are made by a machine but even then, more and more people are actually looking for a hand made book. It does make a book a bit special.
So seeing how the current evolution is, I doubt real books will disappear from the market.
Vladalf
I don't like e-books but with hardcopy we use allot of trees. I think computers will be very used in the future.
GSIS
We live in a world where space is in shorter and shorter supply. Homes are becoming more and more expensive. Many won't be able to afford anything but the most basic of living spaces - perhaps a tiny flat or even a studio apartment. From a retail point-of-view it's already uneconomic to run a decent 2nd hand bookshop, in most towns, unless the proprietor has been able to secure a phenomenal deal on rent and rates.

Under these conditions the storage of paper books will simply become uneconomic and unjustifiable for all but the most avid collectors and curiosity seekers.

At the same time technology is improving so quickly that it is already practical - and will become even more so - to use ebooks on portable media devices. I already do so with a simple Palm device. It's very handy to be able to read, in bed, without having to have the light on - I don't disturb my SO and she doesn't wake up like a rottweiler with PMT when I've been reading until 4am!

Another significant advantage will, of course, be the ability to purchase ebooks online, and be reading them within minutes of purchase. No need to wait for the postman - and no need to travel to the local book store. In addition you'll be able to easily satisfy yourself that you're buying the most recent edition, if that's important to you, instead of having to take whatever the book-seller has on his shelves.

New features are already possible, in ebooks, that were never possible on paper. Moving illustrations, interactive tutorials and demonstrations, question and answer sections that guide the user to the sections of the book that need to be re-read and relearned, online updating of out-of-date material (vital for medical texts, etc) - the possibilities are almost endless. Using the question/answer sections may change the way we work in schools - teachers will be able to ensure required sections of books have been read and understood by getting students to do the tests (at their desks) and feed the results directly to a central hub for monitoring/marking/recording progress.

In my mind there is absolutely no doubt that the popularity of ebooks will increase over that of paper books. Paper books will become little more than collectors items and curiosities - consigned to the history books.
JC Denton
E-books will never be able to beat hardbooks. Why? Well, an e-book will never be able to beat the special feeling when you lay down in a sofa with a great book and just read. Also when I read on the internet for long times, my eyes go stitchy, so e-books is a big no for me. Smile
MeddlingMonk
I've always liked reading and feel that there is nothing like curling up in front of the fire on a winter's day with a good, well-loved book. It just wouldn't be the same with ebooks: a laptop or palm device that can run out of power... virtual bookcases... virtual bookmarks... I doubt ebooks will ever replace books.

I don't doubt that ebooks have their place: they can be very handy in the right situation. But I don't think all these screens we have are good for us and ebooks will just increase our screentime.
Insanity
Well you can always curl up on a comfy sofa with your laptop and just read like that, though it would be slightly uncomfortable. Also, there are also these new gadgets that are about the size of a book that you can download e-books onto and simply read off there.
MeddlingMonk
Quote:
Well you can always curl up on a comfy sofa with your laptop and just read like that, though it would be slightly uncomfortable. Also, there are also these new gadgets that are about the size of a book that you can download e-books onto and simply read off there.


Quite true... you could use a laptop or hand-held device to read an ebook (and they could be used to store far more than one book). I would still prefer a physical book, though... but that's just me.
roboguyspacedude
I have never read an e-book from one of the portable e-book readers, but i have attempted to read one on the computer. I hated it especially when I scrolled and couldn't find my place again. Of course that was in word, i didn't feel like opening it in Microsoft's e-book reader. I decided to print it up instead and read several books that way. Once they develop better portable readers or paper thin screens like the roll able newspaper idea, e-books will probably become big, but right now they are too much bother.
aster
I think there is a important diffrence between e-books and custorm books.

It is "When"!

When you read books in your bookroom or bedroom, it means that you have realesed much and would not like to do something else, so it is your "Peace".

While reading e-books? usually, we go to the net because of work or fan, Not peace!

Though we read e-books in peace sometime, the diffrence ture to "How"! But you will not be tired about "How" if you really like the book.

I mean that "When" is much more important!
furtasacra
There's one simple reason e-books will never completely replace ink on paper. Paper books don't need batteries.
WilStudio
E-Books are so annoying. Reading a screen for hours and hours isn't my type.
MRaftery
hades9366 wrote:
I've tried reading a few e-books but I've always given up. I just don't like looking at digitised text when I'm reading a novel. I like the feel, the weight and even the smell of books but I can see the sense of switching to digital text. For one thing they'd be cheaper to release, meaning the author should get to keep more of the royalties. There's also the forests we'd theoretically be saving. So what do you think? Will e-books ever replace hardcopy books?


It's a fair point about savign trees but until they come up with something that's as light as a book and can be carried about easily I don't see it taking off.
amicalindia
E-Book.

any given day. Can read on laptop or PDA

But i do read hard copy once or twice in a year.
whitehole
I've read a couple books online and lots of short papers and parts of books. I think ebook readers still have some work to become mainstream but they'll get there. People 5000 years ago probably thought that papyrus wouldn't get replaced either but look at us now!
flowerpower
In my opinion, i have a big doubt that ebooks will ever replace hard copies. I tried once or twice to read an ebook; my eyes didn't appreciate that. A book on your lap outside under the sky is a heavenly thing to do on a summer day Wink or on a comfy chair/bed when it's raining or killing time in the bus. Now it depends on the type of books that is being read. A manual or a reference book is easier to go through when it's an ebook.

As roboguyspacedude pointed out:

Quote:
Once they develop better portable readers or paper thin screens like the roll able newspaper idea, e-books will probably become big, but right now they are too much bother.
Eric002
This is what I think :

Quote:
I find in some ways internet and e-mails good ... but half of the time I do not...because with all of these e-cards and e-books and e-phones , etc.... the world will never be the same...friends will only see them selfs on internet with a digital reader or a 3D image reader or a web-cam and they wont go out in town to go to the skate park instead they will stay in there rooms eating drinking coke and other junk food/drinks and get fat and eventually die...

This was a quote from the critic Eric002 on the Modernisal Forum


I wrote this message on a Modernisal Forum or WebSite as sometimes people ask me to critic some subjects ... so when I wrote this critic a few people agreed and some..... disagreed Evil or Very Mad....so in the end the debate was over and close... but I have to agree and say that internet is a very useful thing to have...
mazito
i dont like to read (pleasure) on the PC, Laptop or other device, becuase it not have the spirit, the comfortable furniture to read and learn and think and will be a betthet human bean.


i think that Scifi have a lot of ideas about it, some will be reality and other never happen but i think the hard books will be lost in the future for many reason among others is the ecological and the costo of production.

maybe is just my feelings that dont want to be to modern, but that is life, or why we are writting on the cyber space?

regards
cohinor
The problem of tired eyes will certainly be solved with new less radiating e-book readers.

Nevertheless, the problem is DRM. Every time a new technology is out, the same attempt is done to try to limit the definition of property for the customer when you buy it. You can not copy it, you can not lend it to a friend, why not even try to make the customer pay each time he reads, or facture by word?

Book cannot be followed electronicaly. Book will not betray you by any electronical way because you lent it to you brother. There is no need to phone a number to get a new password to read your book when your computer has blown up.

This is more a problem of disrespect of e-book producers, and more generaly media producers toward customers (or "pigeons"?).

Producer's point of view, If someone mass-disseminates a creation they are in charge (of diffusion), they are juridically responsable towards the author. And even if some customer do not disseminate an e-book without drm they legaly bought, other producer will do, because this is competition, and there is no rule in economical competition. So, customers are sc**wed.

E-book. a wonderfull idea, but only out of economical circuit. That's the problem of intellectual property.
fx-trading-education
Even if ebooks will not replace books, because books are somehow better to handle, ebooks will surpass them in quantity of copies stored, because it is much easier to store.
It is very costly and take a lot of space to buy and store 1000 books with hard cover.
But on a hard drive it is much easier and also much faster to look for a book with the search function. And if I want to read it on paper I just print it, very often 2 pages per side. It even saves paper !
blk3
I used to read normal hardbound books, but now I read e-books. It just saves space and is less expensive are even for free.
roninmedia
I prefer hard copies of the novels I enjoy reading, however as of late, I've been using e-books. I travel and do work with a laptop on a fairly consistent basis so I'm able to sit and read for a few hours on the laptop. I also get a fairly high discount on e-book and audio books so right now it makes sense to me to have more e-books than actual hard copies.
gtoroap
I prefer a hardcopy book, but sometimes, I have to get a e-book, because get access to the hardcopy book is so hard in my country. But that isn't a constraint.
PennyLane
I really don't know how people are able to read those e-books... I prefer to hold the book in my hands and take it with me wherever I go. I know that with a laptop you can also bring your e-book wherever you want, but that's not the same...
And what about having a nice library in your house... I think that's very cool, so I would certainly keep on buying real books Smile
smasha
Maybe one day but I think its at least 2-3 years off being as good as the hard copy.
gtoroap
Well, I wanna know if anyone of you tested Kindle gadget, the ebook reader from Amazon. They says that the experiencies is better than read a printed book. Can anyone share us his experiencie with Kindle?
markovicblue
I belive that in future, real books will be in museums as some sort of ethalon while everybody will use e-book as normal. There is no way you can stop this tension to move to e-book. Like it or not, future comes and trees going away while temperature is higheher and hiegher. I belive most of forum members postet theeir opinions would like an idea of being on a quiest beach reading a real book while sunset makes wonderfull red colors and sea is making waves and noises... I must say, I would like to read Lord of The Rings on such a place but not my C# tutorials. I increased speed of learning C# twice by instaling a second TFT monitor on my desk top PC. While Visual Studio is on a first TFT screen, on a second is some PDF book about C# or MSDN. I can´t tell you how much it is practical. Also, more important is to pass the information the book is holding (or a story) than book it self. Also, I have complete library of Sience Fiction books (Dune, 2001, Foundation, I Robot...) in HTML form. It is great when I finish the chapter and go to sleep and tomorrow I just click on a next chapter.
Yes, future comes. Go to YouTube and look for Windows7 - I belive next generation of laptops will have no keyboard at all! I belive those laptops will make some other improvements and be fantastic books. They will never replace some fealings of reading real book but will replace real book itself and e-book will simply be a standard. Go to Wikipedia and browse a while. How many printed pages you will need to obtain all what it is written there? How much time you will need to find your desired article in such a printed book? It will be as the telephone. Now our evolved mobile phones can also make calls but can send text messages like mail, can send e-mail too, phone can browse internet, can play music and video, can mace photos and videos and can be used as dictaphones. Noone asking question will mobile phone replace regular phone. It is simply happening. No matter we all know mobile phone radiate and boils our brain! Comparing to that, e-books are peice of cake and do not harm us too much. Also, somebody mention batteries. Some 40 years ago, some crazy scientist called Nikola Tesla made energy whireless transportation plan. Using that plan today, we have mobile phones, remote contoler toys and space satellites, radio, TV etc. Improving his original idea to transport whirelessly energy for power supply of device, e-book as every other device will be readable in darkest night and internet will provide every book written on this planet.

Sorry guys, but e-books will kill real books.
AFriedman
E-books for short term skimming. They're easy to get to, easy to see many pages of, easy to put down.

Hard copies for reading in depth.

When I read, I find that my attention span is shorter and I don't remember as much when I'm reading it online. I'm also better off taking notes on a hard copy of a book than on an E-book.
virtus
Not all peoples have pc & they read hardcopy Wink
I think hard copy better then ebooks
crimson_aria
I just realized how handy ebooks really are. uh, well I knew they were handy but i never thought it would come in handy this much. hehe. in my desperate struggle to find enough time to read the Twilight series, I decided to just get the ebook and put it on my phone. and there! it really was so useful. It was so much easier since I could read anywhere, anytime, even in the dark. and without worrying much about crumpling the pages or accidentally tearing off a part or some other accident. This changed the way I look at ebooks.

but even though I appreciate ebooks now, my answer is still the same. ebooks will never ever replace hard copies. the feel is different. holding the book in your hands is much much more a lovelier feeling than holding your laptop or some other gadget.
everfine99
e-book can not replace hard copy.
rufa
I have actually never tried to read an e-book, but I doubt it will every replace the hard copy. I, as many people here love the real thing. You can't just lie down in your bed with your computer and start reading. You can't take your computer to the beach. Real books are just too convenient to get replaced with e-books.

I think e-books is a great complement to the hard copy, It offers a cheap way to distribute books and literature, but it will never replace the real thingy!
jabce85
I think an ebook can serve a purpose. I use them to read the first couple chapters of books before I actually buy the hard copy; kind of a try-before-you-buy sort of thing without going to the bookstore and reading the first few chapters in a noisy and crowded place.

As far as them actually replacing hard copies... It may happen one day, a thousand years from now, but in my lifetime I don't see it happening. Personally I get headaches if I stare at the computer screen for too long (and no, I don't often get headaches from reading from a hard copy).
ProfessorY91
It took many years for me to get used to reading an eBook. Those of the earlier generation can't seem to stand reading anything on a computer for long periods of time, either. I tend to find quality in published, hardcover books simply because I am under the impression that it takes much more work to actually publish and sell books, rather than have them distributed through the various eBook sources online. Then again, my opinion is slightly biased, because I spent many years reading fanfiction (http://www.fanfiction.net/). Fanfiction is obiviously unedited, and of lesser quality. Therefore I tend to find more sustenance in a regular paper made book Smile.

But there is no denying that technology will replace paper and almost all resources that cannot be replenished fast enough to have no impact on the environment (i.e. cutting down trees => Global warming).

Imagine a book as a thinner, high tech version of a tablet PC. One that you can carry around, and have an entire series of books on as well. A piece of technology that mimicks the hardcover, hand bound, book.
Guelila
ebooks tend to hurt my eyes, so I normally dont read any long ebooks.
Also, I try to read classics in hard copy. Smile
thetinyclam
Everyday, books and scholarly papers are constantly being databased. For the older generation, I don't think we can leave hard copy books behind completely. Like you said, the smell of paper and the sensation of flipping a page cannot be reproduced and it is almost comforting if you think about it. But there's the younger generation, kids who grew up with all things digital, they are spending more time writing and reading online, texting on their phones, etc. These kids will not miss books like we do.
georgeodowd
Ahhh, people will never take my real books away from me! Reading is such an aesthetic experience for me... so much so that I often own multiple copies of books because I prefer to read one copy over another. I've also been known to buy a book and then go check it out at the library because I can't bear to put wear on my pristine copy Smile This might have something to do with why I never buy new books anymore.

But honestly, the weight, the texture, the smell, the sound... the pure physical reality of a book is something so valuable to the reading experience. I certainly hope no one lets that fade away.
Pantherus
Me and my friend were discussing this;
the verdict was e-books may accompany paperbooks but the future will be downloading a book in book shops so u choose your book then choose paperback or hardback and then it prints and binds it while you wait and then ready to collect in a hour or two. In a sort of Argos type style you take the cover to the counter then hand it in and they print it for you.
This means there will be no ordering books thus saving on petrol and also no wasted stock of books which will inadvertently save on trees.

Maybe the FUTURE!!!!!
tobking
In my opinion, e-books will never completely replace hardcopies. Hardcopies are just better to read and you can take them easily with you. In addition, there is nothing like starting to read a new book, to be able to touch it and smell this particular scent of a new book.

On the other hand, I think that the market or e-books will grow in the near future. It is just easier and faster to get an e-book than a hardcopy.
littleladyluck
I voted "I doubt it". Frankly, ebook readers (gadgets) and the ancillary technologies are becoming more and more impressive and cutting edge. Now, you can browse online, find an ebook that you would like to read, buy it, read it on your reader. And mind you, those readers are becoming more and more sophisticated and less tiresome for the eyes. I guess technology savvy people would love this. even me. those readers are not cheap. people love paper! a paperless society is far from becoming a reality. Nearly all organisations/companies have their internal systems computerised but they still use paper, tons of it in fact albeit less than before i guess. i find it more comfy for me reading a hardbook really. Anyway, that's question of preference all in all Wink
nfneon
I've had a few good eboks but I could not read them. So I make a print of them.

I realy realy hope, that books will stay books.
WicCaesar
Not replace, but coexist.

I read e-books on my computer and I have no problem with it.
Even the books that I own, I have an e-book copy of it saved for further researches or whatever.
There are also books that I download because there's no translation to my language and the foreign copies has expensive delivery taxes.
An1vad
I like to read technical stuffs on computer, easier to find specifics. But nothing beats paper for escaping into a novel. Curling up with metal / plastic just not the same.
bernardnapoleon
to me e-books are acceptable with novel stuffs, but techinical books , which you need to read from cover to cover, will require you to flip pages back and forth, something that is not easily done with ebooks. to e-books defense, it's easier to find terms in an ebook than with an hard copy. so having both will really be a big help.
torboxz
Surely it will happen. It'll start off from a small company coming up with its own reader and the capability of plugging in thumb drive or flash drive and not so expensive. After people catching up with the tech, then those big fish will start with their own version of reader offering features that's not so featuristic which cost you much higher. What will happen to note/netbook or laptop? Dunno.
jylan
I sincerely hope it won't happen as I love curling up with a book in some corner of the house, so I can just forget about everything else and totally get into the story. I don't think you can do something like this reading an e-book on a phone, PDA or computer, because there are just too many distractions like email, IM, phone calls, etc.

Also I enjoy the feel of a hard copy and turning the pages, its just something about the whole experience that is so much better than an e-book.
mejo1900
I cant read e-books at any angle I prefer. I like to read my books laying on my back and holding it up sometimes...thats kinda hard to do with a computer screen (and hand held devises made to read e-books are waay too expensive). I have tried e-books, but they simply do not feel right.
bchuminx
I do find ebooks although it is convenient but rather straining to the eyes..whereas obtaining the physical copies of a book gives the feel - it is like you get the feel of joy when touching or buying it..I guess it gives more satisfaction to read..you can carry it along wherever you go when you're travelling and yups you can lay on the bed whilst reading the book..flipping ebooks and scrolling down would be kinda tiring and less satisfying...
Some words tend to crammed in tiny prints...I remembered reading Eragon for the first 2 books on ebook...although they were memorable read...the ebooks didnt miss out anything details in print..it was a great job done..but when I got the 3rd book Eragon, hardcover..woa..a total 360 different degree of experience..it just gives you the joy of flipping the pages..the print is bigger and more importantly I can carry it everywhere I go..on the train..on the bus..in Starbucks Smile it was cooler in that sense...I'd prefer a more conventional way of reading that going for absolute electronic version of a book
bri4n5
I prefer hard copies but thanks to ebooks i can read a lot a new content otherwise i couldn't.
melind
While there are some pros to e-books I don't see them potentially replacing hard copies. For me there's something more real about reading a book on paper.
hangnhu
I love ebook, it light and handy and I can carrey loads around with me all the time and it won't weight anymore than how heavy my phone is. ( I read from my phone)
but I doubt it could replace a normal book, although I cannot remember if I ever smell the book before reading, it way nicer to sit on a hammock under the shade with a real paper book
kutekitten
I usually like to have a copy of the book in both paper and on my computer. Ebooks are incredibly handy especially for school work... I got perfect on the last essay I wrote because I had the ebook for it and was able to look up quotes and such. However, if I were to choose between reading an ebook or a paper book for my own enjoyment... the real book will win every time, there is certainly something about the feel of a book that you just don't get from ebooks... also, I read mass amounts every day (I get through books very quickly) I've found with ebooks that it just hurts my eyes to stare at it for lengths of time. As for the people who don't understand about the smell of a book... Have you ever opened up a brand new book for the first time? You'll never find something that smells like new book lol. Ebooks are extremely handy for all sorts of reasons, however, they will not replace the quality of a book.
chiragpatnaik
Dean_The_Great wrote:
E-books are fine if you want the ability to search for quotes and such like that. But agree with Varo and others that it's just an uncomfortable way of doing it.

Also, there is definitely something to be said for the weight, feel and smell of the book. I love reading books that have already been read (used books, or older books from the library), because you can get a sense of the story being told to many. It's weird, but I'm sure some people will understand.


I think most objections seem to be on the point that it is difficult to read, hurting the eyes. So an e-book reader like Kindle is perfect.

Yes you can't beat the feel of a real book. And lets face it some things are best enjoyed in that format. Picture books for children is one example. But for everyday, run of th emill reading (flights, text books etc.) an e-reader will IMHO suffice.
pscompanies
While e-books are definitely cheaper and easier to lug around, I honestly don't think that they are anywhere near the same as sitting down with a printed novel or comic in your hand and reading it.
hangnhu
I already said that hardcopy are better
but now I think ebook has some advantage, like when I'm to lazy to borrow it from the library, I could find an electronic verision online for free and I get to keep it, if it's good
jigoku05
I like hardcopy better because it's easier to read.
I only read e-books if its not available in my country.
And it's much satisfying having a tangible collection than a digital.
biljap
I read both… E-books are better for me if I’m studying; it is just easier for me to read in front of computer and to search Internet for anything that I might need more information.
But, when I want a book to read at my spare time, when I want to relax, it would without any doubt always be a hardcopy. Unless, off course, I can’t find hardcopy, then I would take the e-book.
It is not the same experience, to stare at screen and to feel the paper in your hands. It will never be the same.
nigam
i do like e books....very useful especially not only at school but we used it for business meetings as well....very convenient....
sigT
Assuming that ebooks are considered separately from other computer document formats, there can be serious limitations on the use of ebooks. I think these have been mentioned already above. Some limitations that spring into mind are in fact limitations of hardware displays.

However, if we consider all document formats, the "e-revolution" has in fact already taken place since many reference books are much more convenient if converted, say, into PDF or searchable DjVu (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Djvu).

Having said that, I think it's not as advantageous to read a fiction book in a strict ebook format. Why would one need that? Most likely, not for the purpose of quick search.

Also, I do believe the ebook thing is another attempt to increase commercial output of the publishing industry. Major publishers such as Springer have already switched to electronic formats. This often involves having restricted access documents where the number of possible views or access time is limited. There are many reasons to detest this kind of document distribution.
nigam
ebooks is very cool, how much more if you have a very cool gadget to read your ebook from it. That's even better.
sigT
Reading from a [computer] screen may be fun or not, depending on different conditions. I've had a headache a few days ago which made reading from screen a rather unpleasant experience. At the same time, I have benefited from having hardcopies of some material I downloaded from the Internet in PDFs.

If we consider gadgets for reading ebooks, I believe that paper is the best such "gadget". Very Happy It's healthy, and it doesn't flicker or dazzle you or whatever.
guth75
I Highly doubt it, but if it wasn't for schools and libraries, it could of happened. Although, many places would go out of business, such as Borders, Public Libraries, Etc. and it's all about the money now a days... Anyway, Schools open books about 50 times each day (per person) so unless everyone gets a laptop, or the schools supplies them one, which wouldn't happen because how much money that would cost, that probably won't happen.

Plus people that can't afford a computer/can't use one wouldn't be able to read at all.

That's my opinion, I hope you enjoyed.
k_s_baskar
i even make hardcopy to some important and useful e-books. bcoz i don't wish to miss impartant data due to hardware failure, harddisk crash etc., i really love hardcopy than e-book.
Smile
sudipbanerjee
for me hard copy is far better than e-book. I have tried to read few books in e-book format. But after reading on or two pages I give up. But the same book when I read in hard copy format I continue reading upto its end. Only in case of comics its feel ok for me to read e-book. As a Librarian I also saw that readers prefer hard copy against e-book.
JessieF
I prefer hardcopy to ebooks. It is easier to get comfy while laying down or sitting up reading a book. Also, books smell nice. Laughing Reading on a computer can hurt my eyes after a while, and I read so much, that it is better to read paper than to read ebooks off a computer screen. Also, I collect books, and hope to have my own library. xD I have about 100 books at the moment, though I haven't read them all. Rolling Eyes Some I just got from my step-dad who got them from his grandmother. They're all decades old, one with a story I've been wanting to read for years: Joan of Arc. Very Happy
Ghost900
I only read hard copy books as I like holding a real book that doesn't need to be plugged in or run out of battery. I don't mind reading some things on a screen but books and magazines I prefer in a non-digital format.
sudipbanerjee
hardcopy is still better than e-book because:
i. its easy to read
ii. availability
nigam
yes, i still prefer the hard copy book ones because computers can hurt our eyes...
Radar
I don't quite understand the logic behind buying ebooks. They seem to have almost no advantages over physical books - price perhaps, but the price of a book is easily worth the hours spent reading it.
lovescience
I would like ebook to replace physical paper book in school. I was the kid who liked to bring books to school, even if there had no class of the book that day. If all the books that were needed for school were in ebook, or just by went on line I could read them. I would probably do not have a sense of that books are heavy.

For now and future, I will like to go green for reading ebooks, without the cost of paper and labour shipping physical paper book.
Radar
To answer the question of will they ever replace hard-copy books... I think they will close a lot closer than anyone would like. I think the thought that physical books are going to become rarer than they are now is a valid concern.

Physical books are not going to die out completely though, in my opinion. We've grown up on them too much. There are too many people in the world who can't quite handle the new technology. There's something nice about actually owning something that can't reasonably be taken away or changed on you by someone else. A security, if you will, in the simple nature of it.
gh0strec0n_legit
I think e-readers are the way of the future. I just read online about a school in Florida that gave every student a kindle and it just seems like a lot of schools will soon follow. I already know of one local college that gives their kids iPads and the only reason I can see for doing something like that is to actually use them as textbooks and other research purposes.

For me the idea of carrying textbooks to college everyday is a burden and I'd much rather take a lightweight e-reader. Of course all textbooks aren't e-reader capable so I can't do that just yet. hopefully one day though.
Huntress
as much as ebooks are easy to carry around, I don't think it can ever replace a good hardbound book... Its just nice that the trees are actually going some place with sense, don't you think?
mazito
call me old fasioned but a Book is a treasure, is knowledge is and art, i am in love with the books

i have some ebooks but for consulting, but i prefer the hard copy
weed
ebook are weightless,storage capacity is large and can transfered anywhere around the world but one bad thing is that its hurts our eye so i prefered over hardcopy
Bluedoll
This is an interesting topic and my hat comes off to all those that contributed. I can see how application has a lot to do with the choice of producing or using both forms, ebook or hardcopy. The material I suppose is the key to what form is best. Fiction is better in paperback while a software manual works in an ebook? I suspect other factors, such as cost come into the rational just like library books or privately owned books become the media of choice.
Ankhanu
Bluedoll wrote:
This is an interesting topic and my hat comes off to all those that contributed. I can see how application has a lot to do with the choice of producing or using both forms, ebook or hardcopy. The material I suppose is the key to what form is best. Fiction is better in paperback while a software manual works in an ebook? I suspect other factors, such as cost come into the rational just like library books or privately owned books become the media of choice.

I would say the interface, more than the content of the media, is more important in whether it's better to read e-book or hardcopy. Cost is an obvious consideration too, and I couldn't imagine paying for a stand-alone ebook reader; it would have to have more functions. I use my iPhone and iPad as e-book readers, and they have myriad other functions to help offset their costs, for example.

As I alluded, the comfort and quality of a reader is an important component in deciding whether to read electronic of dead tree books. Since getting my iPad, I've read more e-books than dead trees, but when I had only my iPhone, it was split about 50/50. In any case, I still buy real books, and have only bought one e-book (it was a short story that the author only distributed electronically, and profits went directly to him); what I tend to do is buy the real book, then find a download of it to read on my reader.
The form-factor of my readers; how comfortable they are in my hand, the quality of the display, and the reader program interface, make a big impact on whether or not I'll use it versus the real book I bought. If it's not really comfortable to use, I read the dead tree; but, what I own are comfortable to use, so I go for them more often (it also means that I always have at least one of the books I'm reading in my pocket at all times).
Insanity
It depends a lot on what type of book. I don't think textbooks can ever be on e-book format because it's just too clunky. On the other hand, Kindles and Nooks make reading a pleasure, especially when you have heavy hardcover books to hold for hours at at time. Also, you can get books for free online (legally and illegally), so it's much cheaper. There are tons of public domain books you can get for free.
asnani04
E-books can never replace the existing hard copy books, because reading a book on a computer is much less comfortable than the classic way of reading it on paper. Also, we tend to take things on screen pretty lightly as compared to things written down on paper.
johans
well, at first we need to adjust to digital because we are born and woke up with text book or hard copy books.. before there is no term as "hardcopy" but then when the digital introduce "softcopy" - nice to hear.. then it becomes a big difference between a hard copy and softcopy..

What i am saying is later on our sons son will woke up with digital world.. means all softcopy and text books hard copy becomes the legend..
MisterParker
e-books can't replicate the smell of a brand new book. Smile
deanhills
MisterParker wrote:
e-books can't replicate the smell of a brand new book. Smile
I haven't read an e-book yet. Should try it out to compare. Must agree however, the smell of a brand-new book is inspiring.
TwoOfDiamonds
I have read some ebooks, they were not bad, it's lighter, smaller, cheaper, etc.
However it cannot compensate for the feel of pages sweeping under your fingers and the smell of a just-bought-book paper.
testsoc
I absolutely agree that 'reading on a computer' is inferior to reading a hard copy book. But by that I mean reading a PDF or an ebook on an LCD or LED screen. I print things out quite often in lieu of checking them on screen, simply because I'm more likely to pick up on small details, etc.

But personally I don't consider a Kindle or other e-Ink displays in the same boat. For me, reading on an e-Ink is as comfortable as reading a hard copy book, perhaps more so because it's lighter. Then you have the bonus of loading it up with multiple books for travelling, commuting, etc, as well as the ease of purchase when you're out and about.

I don't remember the last time I read a hard copy book, and I for one don't miss them.
milkshake01
Ebook Readers aren't very good so I don't think it would replace the traditional book.
tyrus
E-copey vs hardcopy novels- i prefer hard novels

MOD - Thread moved to integrate with the official topic on paper vs ebook.
-Ankhanu
codegeek
I have actually grown used to reading e-books, especially on my tablet. I think it provides some benefits to hard copy. For one thing, you can carry around an entire collection of books to read anywhere. Plus, e-books tend to be cheaper as well (or even free). They don't need paper. So, no trees are cut down to make e-books. Hence, it's better for the environment as well. All in all, I think e-books will replace hard copies in the future.
Peterssidan
I have never read a novel as an e-book. I think it's not as pleasant for the eyes to read from a screen. With a physical book it's much easier to go back and forth if I want to look up something that I forgot about.
c'tair
Well, it really depends.

Personally I prefer real books. There's nothing better than reading a good book in bed late at night, when you're all warm and cozy and a low-wattage incandescent light shines on each page. Or when you're in a park on a blanket, enjoying that warm and soft earth beneath you and the delicate sun on your skin.

However, e-books have their merits such as price and size. All of my technical or textbooks are in e-book format which saves me lugging around pounds and pounds of paper with me. Plus they never get destroyed, forgotten, torn, ripped, etc.

In a perfect world, I'd have all of my literature in paper and all of my technical stuff in PDF Smile
Vanilla
I read all the time and all I can say is that there is nothing like ebooks and scientific articles in PDF format. When I write a paper or an essay I easily read more than 100-120 papers. Can you imagine printing all that stuff? With PDF articles it's easier to look for what I want. The same happens with ebooks: I can carry all the books that I want without the extra weight. Imagine carrying all A song of Ice and Fire volumes! Well, I can do that without breaking a sweat with my ebook reader. Very Happy

Peterssidan wrote:
I have never read a novel as an e-book. I think it's not as pleasant for the eyes to read from a screen. With a physical book it's much easier to go back and forth if I want to look up something that I forgot about.


When you get used to it, you won't even notice the difference. As to find something specific, you can use Ctrl+F. Smile
GuidanceReader
I love my kindle. I find it a nice size, and with the cover comparable to a thin book, but I can read any sized novel on it. I still get the nice feel of the little book light on it when reading it bed, as I got the cheaper version without the backlit screen. I think it is very similar to reading an actual book, besides the physical paper thing and turning the pages.
manverupl
Ok Ebooks are fine but nothing will replace an old good book.
Firstly Ebook readers are more expensive that hard copy.
Another is that Ebook readers or another devices like that need battery, and if you don't have an access to electricity your ebook is useless, when you can read a paper book everywhere.
Ok it is small and easier to read, but if you don't have an ebook with e-paper(with is more expensive) reading on ebook isn't good for your eyes., ok some say that books are not good for eyes too. Yes its true but still, by reading ebooks you can get the eye defect easier.
And as someone earlier say, having hard copies and keeping them on the bookshelf, makes you self satisfied and it's have a nice look.
ratanegra
I used to love hard-cover novels more than e-books, since I only had my PC's screen. However, now that I bought my Kindle I have read tons and tons of books. I'd say, as codegeek pointed out, that the latter have many pros over physical books. First, they're absolutely free. Second, the Kindle is light and thin, so I carry it in my pocket everywhere I go. Third, I can look up every word I don't know instantly by just pressing the screen. Fourth, I can carry as many books as I like with me, so I can read a book or the other depending on my mood. Fifth, bookmarking is automatic, so I never lose my progress. Also, I can highlight any word I like without damaging the original. So, in my honest opinion, the advantages of e-books greatly overshadow the disadvantages (which I only perceive in terms of formatting).
Radar
I initially thought hardback vs paperback. That's a more specific debate though.

I feel like ebooks highlight the fact that this is a construction. Being digital, it feels less natural. Maybe it's the same way I feel about 2D vs 3D movies, even though that's completely different. 3D movies make you aware of the techniques used, and distract you from the story. Digital mediums of text have that effect for me, a bit.
Ankhanu
I've come to prefer e-books, actually.
I still buy books in paper to add to my collection/library, but then I download them and read them on my iPhone or iPad. I find the e-reader far more convenient and comfortable to hold, and I never have to worry about over-opening a book and creasing the binding Wink
Mr_Howl
I also prefer real books. Reading on my laptop or phone can be tough on the eyes. Maybe if I had a Kindle, with that neat screen, I'd feel differently.

I also don't like how many e-books cost the same price (some even more) than their paper brethren. Seriously? The publisher doesn't have to pay for printing, storage, or distribution. Also, there's often no easy way to lend or re-sell e-books, so in that sense they provide less "value" to the consumer.
catscratches
I think taxation is among the major things holding back ebooks in Sweden right now. The standard taxation for things in Sweden is 25%. Books, however, are an exception at 6%. However, ebooks are just digital data, which technically could be anything, so according to current law they're taxed at the full 25%, meaning ebooks are frequently more expensive than their physical counterpart.
onebadpenny
I love my kindle, love it. But there's nothing like a room full of books. It's really hard to wrap my mind around the fact that there are tens of thousands of ebooks now that exist only digitally. So weird.

I DO like that when I travel I don't have to carry a whole suitcase just for books (because who knows what kind of book I'll be in the mood for at any given moment).
sysna
of course ebooks, i have a kindle and i just enjoy it a lot when i'm reading books, but if i found some book to be a lot interesting than normal ones i usually get its hardcopy one to read again and keep it in my library, i think books in their hardcopy style are more valuable. by the way by downloading ebooks it is now so much easier to get and read your favorite book in just few seconds.
pravojednostavno
I prefer hardcopy.
Radar
E-books do not have the same feel, history, assocation, etc., as physical books.

I think my main problem si the incredibly generic way in which you view e-books. You don't pick up an individual book. You pick up your iPad, or similar, and read text. You could be reading something completely different. It just kind of merges into the rest of your experiences on that device, in a way that reading a physical book generally doesn't.
Blummer
Considered myself a sucker for anything paper made, as well as books. Had to obtain a Kindle since I started getting rid of many many books I don't need anymore.

Now I think - one can have hardcopies and e-readers at the same time. Why not? e-readers allow you to obtain any material quicker than you can get a hard copy. They allow you to read more books in a specific time, than you can get as a hardcopy. You can have both of them, they won't affect each other. And yes, when on a long trip, you can't carry 5 books, whereas e-readers allows to keep everything in one place and if don't particularly care for book smell at that moment, nothing should keep you from reading e-reader. It's about reading, not the way you read. The more you read, the more you learn.
johans
for important documents still i preferred documents hard-copy.
Jex_Infinite
I always associate reading off a screen with research. Reading the English study books of an eReader seems normal, or gathering interwebz information. Reading for entertainment off a screen, no matter how much they make it less damaging for your eyes, will just be harder than opening that dusty old tome and absorbing the information. Books and eBooks will co-exist. Synthetic paper has been made if you are worried about the trees.

Physical books just seem much nicer than flat screens. I own many books and an eReader and definitely prefer physical books. They look and feel nicer than eReaders and have a certain feel about them that I can't put my finger on.
Caily
I used to be one of those people who said I'd never switch to e-books. Well, that was before I finally got my first e-book reader--just the basic Amazon Kindle. I didn't pick up a hardcopy book for six months after that! Not because there weren't any interesting books, because there were. It's just that I found the experience of reading a book on my Kindle even better. It's one thing to read from a computer screen and an absolutely different thing to read from a device that is specifically designed for reading.
And ereaders have so many advantages to paper novels:
- you can adjust the font size -- which is incredibly useful, because when I read a book with tiny font my eyes strain
- you can carry your entire library wherever you go--literally thousands of books, so when you go on a vacation, instead of packing five books that will take up the precious space in your suitcase, you can simply take your ereader which weighs less than one paperback
- there are so many ebooks that you can download for free or purchase for a very small price ($0.99 - $2.99) -- and those are good books by talented authors, not just something that is discounted because no one buys it; there is no way you can build a library of hardcopy books for such a low price and when you read 100+ novels a year, that's a lot of savings; of course, you can get your books in the library for free, but then you have to return them, so it's definitely not the same thing
I love trying books in ebook format first, and then buying only my favorite ones--the ones that I will want to reread over and over again--in paperback or hardcover. I think it's the best of both worlds.
DarkWizard
Hardcopy books are the best-eBooks don`t have the same feel.

I also have a hard time reading the text on the eBook.

Plus, normal books have been around for thousands of years, and some people are hard pressed to forget their habits.
codegeek
E-books are bound to replace paper books as technology goes on developing. It may take a couple of hundred years, but it's going to happen for sure. For one thing, the resources that need to be spent to produce paper will become more and more limited as well as costlier. Moreover, the coming generations are going to have a lot more exposure to reading on electronic devices than we did as kids, which means that's what they're going to be used to.

P.S. To prepare for this inevitable shift to e-books, I bought a Kindle 4 recently. Very Happy
StriderVM
Unfortunately the improvement from Hardbooks to E-Books is very similar to the improvement from Analog (Phonograph) to Digital Audio (MP3).

They're just more convenient. Also the devices that can be used to listen to such recording are too many and can be multuse as well.

However, it doesn't mean that it will disappear. They have their own niche. One of the main places to get hardbooks is Libraries because it is their main purpose, storing information. and has the capacity and space for it. While a typical home might not have such places (In which digital ones can circumvent.)

Trust me it won't be gone. I will even bet money that for some reason we wipe ourselves out of something there's a better chance that the hardbooks will remain than digital books will remain.
ganni
I love all forms of books. I doesn't matter what form my reading material takes, for all the that I care is what is inside. Though, I prefer hard copy versions whenever possible. Since most of the old texts are hard to get and it is often the case that digital copy only option.
I use my android phone and ipad interchangeably for my reading purpose mostly. though, if I have paper copy, I would definitely read that one. Smile
Beds
Physical books can never really be replaced as if it wasn't for books, there wouldn't be any logical reason to have e-readers. So, therefore, no, books are irreplaceable.
Insanity
That doesn't really make sense. You can of course have everything be ebooks because you don't need a physical book anymore to publish it as an ebook. It's basically all done on the computer. You type out the book on the computer, then you convert it to an ebook format. It's how it's been done all the time. It doesn't get printed out as a book then converted into an ebook.

At any rate, I do think there are physical books that just won't work very well in an ebook format, at least for the time being. I think in the future, maybe the far future, there will be technologies that make it easier to read things like comic books and newspapers much easier on an ebook format, but right now those types of media are hard to convert to an easily readable ebook format. There are also some books that you might like to write on and highlight, and I can imagine doing that with tablets, but the techonology isn't great at that point yet.
catscratches
Insanity wrote:
That doesn't really make sense. You can of course have everything be ebooks because you don't need a physical book anymore to publish it as an ebook. It's basically all done on the computer. You type out the book on the computer, then you convert it to an ebook format. It's how it's been done all the time. It doesn't get printed out as a book then converted into an ebook.

At any rate, I do think there are physical books that just won't work very well in an ebook format, at least for the time being. I think in the future, maybe the far future, there will be technologies that make it easier to read things like comic books and newspapers much easier on an ebook format, but right now those types of media are hard to convert to an easily readable ebook format. There are also some books that you might like to write on and highlight, and I can imagine doing that with tablets, but the techonology isn't great at that point yet.
Actually, Marvel and DC* have their own subscription based online comic book services where you get access to digital comics so I think they're doing quite fine on the digital comic front.

When it comes to textbooks I very much prefer ebooks due to much easier searching / bookmarks / indexing.

* Or maybe it's just one of them. I don't really read superhero comics.
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