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Hibernating





jarred89
Hello I was wondering when you take the computer out of Hibernating when you turn it back on is everything still saved onto the hardrive?
jaysen
If everything is working fine then your compurter should come back up just like you left it
darknez3
All hibernation does really is freeze everything you've had working, shove all information temporarily on you harddrive and put your computer in stand by kind of mode except it uses 10x less power to retain your data. Then when you turn it on, everything you had open (even games, other progs) will be there.
cheeta
jarred89 wrote:
Hello I was wondering when you take the computer out of Hibernating when you turn it back on is everything still saved onto the hardrive?


well if system does a succesfull resume from Hibernate... the Saved data gets deleted to free up space for next hibernate...

but nothing gets completelly deleted... there r extrem software which can get that data back... but problem is to read that data what windows writes as u cant find any reader to read it... Confused Confused
tanapat
When you use Hibernate windows will save all of process and status to harddisk thus you may want to use a big size of harddisk if you have big size of memory too...javascript:emoticon('Razz')
Razz
mark
The computer, when given the command to Hibernate saves an image of the current screen status onto the HDD and then closes. After you resume it, the screen turns back on as you had it before.

What my question is that can you safely turn off the main power when you put the computer on Hibernate? If thats so, then I will use Hibernation as an alternative to shutting down.
Animal
mark wrote:
The computer, when given the command to Hibernate saves an image of the current screen status onto the HDD and then closes. After you resume it, the screen turns back on as you had it before.


No, it doesn't. Hibernation writes all the contents of your RAM to the hard disk then essentially powers-off. When you resume your computer, it reads all the data from the hard disk back to RAM and your PC's state is resumed. It has nothing to do with images of your current screen - the reason it stays the same is because the RAM contents are restored.

mark wrote:
What my question is that can you safely turn off the main power when you put the computer on Hibernate? If thats so, then I will use Hibernation as an alternative to shutting down.


I don't think so, but you could experiment. I think that if you switch off your computer's power, it loses the "startup command" to load from the hibernated state. When you re-power-up your computer, it would use the Master Boot Record to load. Hibernation doesn't affect the boot record, so it's unlikely that it would resume properly.

You should experiment with this though and see if you can get it to work.
mark
Animal wrote:
You should experiment with this though and see if you can get it to work.


Yeah, Animal, it resumes the same way I had turned it off. I don't think turning off must be harming the computer when in hibernation.
Kydha
It's goos to know. ty for this interesting post... i had the same question Smile
mOrpheuS
Animal wrote:
I don't think so, but you could experiment. I think that if you switch off your computer's power, it loses the "startup command" to load from the hibernated state. When you re-power-up your computer, it would use the Master Boot Record to load. Hibernation doesn't affect the boot record, so it's unlikely that it would resume properly.

You can indeed power off your system after hibernating it.
Disconnect it from power altogether, dismantle it ... etc
Just remember to put everything back the way they were before resuming.

Hibernation basically dumps the memory data along with the CPU flags and cache contents to a file called hiberfil.sys (dos styled 8.3 nomenclature), flags off the OS to boot off this file instead of a fresh boot at next startup, closes device I/O and powers off.
That means you'll need to have that much free space on your system partition.

If there's any hardware change/removal since the hibernation, the device driver will get loaded but the device itself will not be found - blue screen of death.
The same will happen if any of the system files or files that were in use before hibernation are deleted or altered.

In short, you can use hibernation as an alternative to shutdown, if you don't mind waiting a little extra before turning off your system.
darknez3
I can argue that morpheus.

I got a laptop, and when i put it into hibernation...obviously it goes into hibernation. But if you take out the battery and power, then nothign saves and when u put battery back in you find that windows was shutdown becoz u took out the power.
TabletPCUser
darknez3 wrote:
I can argue that morpheus.

I got a laptop, and when i put it into hibernation...obviously it goes into hibernation. But if you take out the battery and power, then nothign saves and when u put battery back in you find that windows was shutdown becoz u took out the power.


Hibernation and StandBy are different Power-Saving states! You are probably talking about the latter, while the discussion is about the former.

If you want to see, go to Power settings, enable Hibernation, and after clicking shutdown, hold shift to show this option.
djfreakske
when i use hibernation the computer turns completely off, but if you put it on standby then there will be a little part of your laptop that is active. in either way you can never take out your battery out of your laptop, because then you loose data. Rolling Eyes if you want to do this then use a shutdown. i try not to use this functions because before i had some serious data loss because of this.
TabletPCUser
djfreakske wrote:
when i use hibernation the computer turns completely off, but if you put it on standby then there will be a little part of your laptop that is active. in either way you can never take out your battery out of your laptop, because then you loose data. Rolling Eyes if you want to do this then use a shutdown. i try not to use this functions because before i had some serious data loss because of this.


I don't think this is true. As someone already wrote, hibernation is basically a memory dump to your HDD, followed by complete power-off. When you boot, instead of loading every single file, it loads the memory dump, so that, your computer is back to its state before hibernation.
SoftStag
This is what Microsoft say about hibernation:
Quote:
Windows XP has built-in support for hibernation (OS-controlled ACPI S4 sleep state). Hibernation saves the complete state of the computer and turns off the power. The computer appears to be off. This is the lowest power sleeping state available and is secure from power outages.

When you resume from a hibernated sleep state, the BIOS performs the normal POST, and then reads the hiberfile that was created to save the computer state. The computer returns to the last state it was in before the computer entered hibernation mode. Hibernate mode reduces start time.

Note that when you service the computer, make sure you shut down the computer instead of using hibernate mode.

Windows XP supports Hibernate capabilities (ACPI S4 sleep state). Windows XP S4OS Hibernate is available on new computers and upgrades that meet the requirements for the correct video drivers and no VXD audio drivers.

S4 is the hibernation state. It is very close to the APM Suspend to Disk state.

Hibernation Requirements

Computer must support APM 1.2, or ACPI.
A paging device that supports D3 (note - certain SCSI configurations do not support this).
WDM audio.
No legacy capture devices connected.
WebTV for Windows is not installed.
Non-ICS Host (client is OK).

As you can see from the bold text, it is safe from power outages.

Here is some more info from Microsoft's site about hibernate:
Quote:
Hibernate mode writes an image of what you're currently working on to a special file on your hard drive, and then shuts your computer almost completely off. It takes a bit longer than Standby, since it needs to write to your hard drive. Hibernate also takes a bit longer to resume, since you must go through essentially the normal boot process, although in Windows XP your computer wakes faster from Hibernate than in previous versions of Windows. The advantage is that you can leave your laptop in Hibernate mode for days without any ill effect. When you start it back up, you'll see everything exactly as you left it. Hibernate is the perfect mode for shutting down for the night or even the weekend.

If you are using Windows XP Home Edition, or Windows XP Professional with Fast User Switching turned on, the Turn Off Computer menu will present the options to Stand By, Turn Off, or Restart your computer. To put your computer into Hibernate mode, click Start, and then click Turn off computer. Press and hold the Shift key. The label under the first button changes from Stand By to Hibernate. Click Hibernate.
carriage_return
Since this has become a most informative post about hibernating, I thought I could ask some of you about a couple of doubts that have been troubling me for some time now.

First of all is my stand-by (I know it's not hibernating, but if you could bear with me please) button. The thing is, it's grayed out. I've come to the conclusion, after testing over and over again (which might prove pointless next to the "magic" of computers), that it is the ink monitor program of my Epson printer the one who is doing the sneaky job of turning it off (at least it inmidiately grays it out after installing such program/driver). I used to take advantage of the stand by button, and wanted to know if there is a way to bring it back to life without sacrificing my ink monitor (of course if it's a soft specific question, something completely uncommon, then I understand it's a most silly question to ask).

Second, is the hibernating thing. First of all, I understand that you have to activate it in order to use it. I'd love to know where I can do that, I'll conduct some testing today but just in case I don't find it. Second of all is: Do you think it will work if stand-by doesn't? that is, do you think that the same thing that will prevent stand-by from working will do its fiendish job with hibernation?.

Third and last -and I'll make it straightforward-. I assume the computer can not keep working while on hibernation (for example, downloading things, making files, and so on). I also suppose the reason for hibernating ones own computer -according to what microsoft says, being a good way to turn it off for the night or weekend- must have something to do with ease of use and power saving. Could someone (since it's related to the hibernation) explain the benefits of such process. If you think it would be off-topic I will be glad to make a new thread for this matter, but I think it could be answered here.

carriage_return
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