FRIHOST FORUMS SEARCH FAQ TOS BLOGS COMPETITIONS
You are invited to Log in or Register a free Frihost Account!


Are you a network engineer?





NuniPio
i was thinking of studying network engineering, but wanted to know if the career is the right one for me, so if you're a network engineer, can you please let me know a bit about what you really do..thanks
Daniel15
I'm not a network engineer, but I'm CCNA qualified Very Happy

What would you like to do in networking? Cable installation? Computer Configuration? Router programming/setup? Or something else?
albusa
i think is good
albusa
actually i want to study it
narc
I'm a computer engineer, which is really close to a network engineer.

In oregon, the differenc is about 5 classes. All engineering is pretty close to the same, then the major fields of electrical, computer, network are even more similar. Mechanical, structural, and civil are very similar as well, but not to electrical, computer and network.

Any way, when you toss the word "engineer" out there, you are really referring to design. Things are engineered to meet specifications, and a well educated engineer knows how to make things robust enough to do what they are intended to do.

With that said, a network engineer has a deep understanding of load, speed, balancing, traffic patterns, redundancy and the like, and is able to use those concepts to design a network infrastructure that can live up to the design specs.

Design specs are frequently not as well defined as they should be, because frankly it takes an engineer to write correct design specs. So another part of being an engineer is taking poorly designed plans, making them well designed plans, then taking the plans to completion.

Want to know more? I can ramble for hours Smile
narc
daniel15 wrote:
I'm not a network engineer, but I'm CCNA qualified Very Happy

What would you like to do in networking? Cable installation? Computer Configuration? Router programming/setup? Or something else?


I would like to comment here that cable installation, computer configuration, and router programming do not take an engineering degree. These are more the kind of technical things that a CCNA / MCSE woud do.

And while we are on that topic, damn microsoft and their incorrect use of the word engineer in MCSE. Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer means nothing more than "I paid $3,000 for a title".

MCSE's are NOT engineers.
photon
im also currently persuing my CCNA. while it cannot completely qualify as a engineering course, its pretty close to it. you will get to learn all the basics of networking, go on to network design, router configuration, creating access lists, wan, vlan, etc. its pretty much a comprehensive course. if you want to get started in the networking field, this is where you should start
Pikokola
Wait a minute, maybe I'm a noob here (and I do Smile)

what's CCNA Rolling Eyes
photon
Quote:
Wait a minute, maybe I'm a noob here (and I do Smile)

what's CCNA


CCNA stands for cisco certified netwok associate. its right now more or less the de-facto certification in networking field. mostly you learn about configuring cisco routers (duh!) , switches, etc...
orc_lord
maybe but i don't think so Sad
narc
photon wrote:
im also currently persuing my CCNA. while it cannot completely qualify as a engineering course, its pretty close to it. you will get to learn all the basics of networking, go on to network design, router configuration, creating access lists, wan, vlan, etc. its pretty much a comprehensive course. if you want to get started in the networking field, this is where you should start


I totally disagree. It is nothing like an engineering course. It is very much like a tech course.

Tech courses are hands on, get the job done courses. You learn how to "do" things. That is a tech course.

Engineering courses are design courses, and they start with theories. You spend the first 2 years just studying formulas and applications. You learn discrete math to solve probability equations, you learn integral and vector calculus to solve the impossible to solve problems (such as divide by 0... limit of 1/x^2 as x->0 is solvable in calculus). You learn ohm's law, watt's law, kirchoff's law and how to solve nth degree vector equations. You learn fluid dynamics, thermodynamics, and how to calculate band-gaps.

What I'm saying is that actuall college engineering degrees are tough. Very tough. And they take 5 solid years of 20 credits / term, and usually cost no less than $30,000 even at a state college.

Now tell me that a degree that you can get in 1 term at the community college for $3,000 is even close to a real engineering degree.
photon
Quote:
Now tell me that a degree that you can get in 1 term at the community college for $3,000 is even close to a real engineering degree.


i never implied that its an engineering degree in common. read the first post that nunipio posted :
Quote:
i was thinking of studying network engineering, but wanted to know if the career is the right one for me, so if you're a network engineer, can you please let me know a bit about what you really do..thank


the topic was "network engineering" and thats what i wrote about. while CCNA does not certainly qualify as an engg degree, its pretty much the foundation for networking basics. at least in my country.

and i never knew networking engg courses had discreet math, thermodynamics, fluid dynamics in it
K2thach
I am thinking of going to to school to earn a BS in (CIS) computer information systems. I'm really interested in becoming a network administrator , but recently in my research I found that with this degree I can also become a network engineer. I want to know if anyone out there that is a network engineer know this to be true. I'm really confuse. And how must I need a master degree if I want to be a network engineer ? Please help me.
welshsteve
I am an ICT Technician at a school, but I have no formal network engineering or administration qualifications. I'd like to have them as it not only increases you pay and job prospects for the future, but also benefits your current employers reputation etc.
c'tair
I'm getting an associates degree in computer science and I'm also working on my cisco certification.

In the future, I know I'd like to code, that's the most important thing in my opinion. Most probably web-development, but I still haven't chosen a subfield for sure. I'm getting my certification for a few reasons:
- learn about how networks work, this will complement my programming knowledge.
- hopefully get a better job than help desk in a huge retail store.

The first reason is the most important, but damn me if I wouldn't want to grab a job which treats me as a real human being, where the work is both demanding, non-repetitive, and from which you can step away and say "damn, I sure did built something".
pll
I'm studying in telecommunications. The fun thing with this field is that you can touch almost everything.
We get on the CISCO (and other brands) routers and we make lines of codes.
But we also see all the electric behaviour to transport a signal on a wire or wireless. Everything that could send info from a computer to another.

It is a really great domain!
I just hope that I will be able to finish.
geekbackpacker
Job Description please
Related topics
A problem with my computer.....need help...plz
Home LAN problem
do you love your job?
The Diddyman is here:
MCP, CCNA, MCSE (Study Course and Jobs)
Jobs in New Zealand
Australian Chinese
Where Do You Work, And What Do You Do?
What is your profession ?
Is faster acess to the internet need?
CNG for cars
Cisco was available in VietNam
GM's OnStar: Pulling the plug on Big Brother.
i would like to be Network Engineer
Reply to topic    Frihost Forum Index -> Lifestyle and News -> Jobs and Learning

FRIHOST HOME | FAQ | TOS | ABOUT US | CONTACT US | SITE MAP
© 2005-2011 Frihost, forums powered by phpBB.