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Then or than?





madsencarl
I was wondering when to use the word "than" and the word "then". I'm really confused Confused
Anybody know? It's been bugging me for years...
jeffsolodky
I am most likely wrong, but I believe "than" is used for plural.
aerialdreams
one way to differentiate between them is that "then" is used in a time sequence, like when you are saying something happens after something else. Ex: Ella ate her food, then she watched t.v.
"than" is used when comparing two things, like when you say one thing is smaller or better etc. Ex. Jenny is a better writer than him. OR Fred is taller than James.

There's probably other ways to use the two words, but this is usually what they are used for. Did I just confuse you more? I hope not, and I'm sure someone else out there could probably explain it better than me. But, until then, this is the best I can give! Very Happy

p.s. "than" is not used as a plural... I don't think there is a plural form for these words...
Jayfarer
"Then" can be used in a variety of ways, but "Than" is always used when comparing two things. Otherwise stick with "Then".
wowz
An editor's nightmare

I'm glad that someone actually seeks out the true meaning of the words: than and then.
hehehehe - aerialdreams is right Smile
Than = comparison, then = time
Two completely different words that tend to be used interchangably.

Now if we could only have people seek out more words that they misuse, like hilarious and hysterical. People say 'that's hysterical'... to those of us that know better, do you know how silly you sound? I think it's hilarious actually Wink

hysterical - mental state, hysteria, insane, out of control, riot
hilarious - funny, extremely funny, haha funny

And for future refernece to anyone that cares, alot is not a word and never was. A lot, however, is a good description for 'many'. Very Happy
Sentenza
I never knew about the "alot" thing, english is only my second language anyway, thanks.Smile
Blaster
aerialdreams wrote:
one way to differentiate between them is that "then" is used in a time sequence, like when you are saying something happens after something else. Ex: Ella ate her food, then she watched t.v.
"than" is used when comparing two things, like when you say one thing is smaller or better etc. Ex. Jenny is a better writer than him. OR Fred is taller than James.

There's probably other ways to use the two words, but this is usually what they are used for. Did I just confuse you more? I hope not, and I'm sure someone else out there could probably explain it better than me. But, until then, this is the best I can give! Very Happy

p.s. "than" is not used as a plural... I don't think there is a plural form for these words...

This person is right. Than is used most of the time in math, 4 is more Than 3 for example.
Vrythramax
Than:

Used as a function word to indicate that what immediatly follows is the second member or the member taken as point of departure in a comparison expressive of inequality. Also used with comparative adjectives and comparative adverbs.

________

Then:

1) Used as a reference of time mentioned or specified, (i.e. "Science as it was then taught")

2) Soon after, immediatly after or next in order of time (i.e. "he walked to the door then turned", "first left then right", "then came the thunder")

3)Following next after in order of position, narration, or enumeration (i.e. "a hill then a river valley then another hill"


Hope this helps put it into perspective Wink
SystemWisdom
wowz wrote:

Now if we could only have people seek out more words that they misuse, like hilarious and hysterical. People say 'that's hysterical'... to those of us that know better, do you know how silly you sound? I think it's hilarious actually Wink

hysterical - mental state, hysteria, insane, out of control, riot
hilarious - funny, extremely funny, haha funny


That's hysterical! And I mean that in the informal variation of the word:

hys·ter·i·cal
adj.

1. Of, characterized by, or arising from hysteria.
2. Having or prone to having hysterics.
3. Informal. Extremely funny: told a hysterical story.


(From dictionary.com)

Thus, hysterical may be used in the same way as hilarious, and for those of us who know better, we don't sound silly at all. On the contrary, you sound silly saying that hysterical has a limited meaning! Very Happy
Carupieara
Another commonly mistaken word that I find a lot everywhere is when people confuse your with you're
Scaramanga
Carupieara wrote:
Another commonly mistaken word that I find a lot everywhere is when people confuse your with you're

And dont' even get me started on 'there', 'their' and 'they're'!
Jeslyn
Oh it annoys me to NO end when people confuse your and you're, and there, their, and their, and were, where and we're. That's a huge pet peeve of mine.

I was listening to a radio station once, and my car displays a message that the radio station made up across the display screen - this radio station's message was "You're number one DC station".... I had to turn the station because it was annoying me so much Embarassed
MalvagioAddict
okay, though i'm not a stickler for correct grammar, heaven knows that I usually get mine wrong each and every time I use those words.

I did not consult any book but this is just how i see it.

you're is probably used to say something about a person, like you're beautiful, you're smart. etc.

your well it denotes ownershipe of some sort, like your question, your wife, your lover etc.

but with regards to Jeslyn there, their and they're were, where we're, well let's leave that to someone else..
-TomJ-
MalvagioAddict wrote:
<...>
but with regards to Jeslyn there, their and they're were, where we're, well let's leave that to someone else..


Basically it is so easy:
there is pointing to a location: I am here and that tree is there.
their means something belonging to them, their tree.
they're is a short form for they are: they're under the tree.

where is the question-brother of there: where is the tree?
we're is the short form for we are: we are under the tree.
were is the past tense of are: yesterday we were under the tree.

Don't just use your ears, use your brain to determine which word to use.
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