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Which Linux distribution is the best?





hack_man_
I currently have Windows XP (god help me) and want to change to Linux. I know that Linux is open-source, but does that mean that it is free? I have no idea on the matter so I decided to consult the forums.

EDIT: New question. See topic title

Stickied by Animal - 31 May 06
madsencarl
Well, open source means it's usually completely and utterly free, no strings attached, but in rare cases you might have to pay for it. I'm pretty sure Linux is free though.

dictionary.com wrote:
The term "open source" is now more widely used than the earlier term "free software" (promoted by the Free Software
Foundation) but has broadly the same meaning - free of
distribution restrictions, not necessarily free of charge.
Vrythramax
What alot of people don't understand is that all flavors of UNIX are free, what we end paying for is software bundled with the main kernal.

Try this site: http://distrocenter.linux.com/

The package I think you'll find most interesting is Debian GNU/Linux, and you can find them, and a downloadable (I Think) distribution here: http://www.debian.org/

I just checked the site and the distribution is avaiable at: http://www.debian.org/distrib/


Hope this helps.

Rule #1 when running UNIX....if it ain't bitchin' it's working just fine.
photon
actually all of the linux distros are free. if you pay for it, you usually get a commercial edition complete with free upgrades, technical support, installation help etc. ..
neosree
So we can replicate those Suse linux, Redhat linux, Mandrake, Linspire and give them to friends. Or a group of friends can buy it together sharing money, in case they dont have the source CD/DVDs.
blackstripes
linux is totally free... so free that you can actually go to their website and download the iso for it
DRock
photon wrote:
actually all of the linux distros are free. if you pay for it, you usually get a commercial edition complete with free upgrades, technical support, installation help etc. ..


Definately. From my experience, I had a free copy of Linspire (they were giving it away for a month or so) BUT, if you want to install any software other than what comes with it, you have to pay for it (i forget the service exactly)

If you are looking for an easy to use and great forum community, i'd recommend Ubuntu linux. http://www.ubuntulinux.org to download, and http://www.ubuntuforums.org for support and help.

Also, if you like a windows feel to linux, try kubuntu. http://www.kubuntu.org
LandShark
^^ thats what linux i use. They have forums to help with everything. they ship it for free and they always give extra discs so you can give them to your friends and stuff. Linux is pretty awesome, but before you do install it on your computer, make sure yuo know how to run a UNIX based OS
goutha
Linux is 100% free. It is not shareware. It won't cost you a dime. You can borrow a copy from a friend and use it for free, legally. Or you can buy a CD-ROM for yourself. It's still free, you're just paying for the CD-ROM and maybe some other stuff. The cheapest CD-ROM I've seen is $1.89 ordered online. You can also buy Linux boxed up with a nice manual and user support for about fifty dollars. Of course, you could download Linux off of the internet for nothing, but that would take hours and your time is much more valuable than that. My favorite source of Linux CD's is the LinuxMall ( http://www.linuxmall.com/ ).
SNES350
I recommend trying http://www.knoppix.org/ (site defaults to German, just select the flag that is half of the U.S. flag and other half is Britain), it is downloadable as a CD image (the latest one is a DVD image though) that you can burn, then put it in a computer, restart, and be using a version of Debian right from the disc without installing anything.
Nyizsa
Yes, Knoppix is a good choice to start with. Just boot, play, and if you like it, you can install a permanent image to the HD. Or download the distro of your preference, as the others mentioned. My suggestion is that whichever you are going to install, keep that Knoppix CD! It may come handy if you do something wrong and your system doesn't start up. Boot Knoppix, edit the file you messed up, and be happy!

Anyway, Linux is so free that you may even re-sell it! (If certain conditions apply, of course - check out the homepage of your selected distribution.)
devroom
Did not see any ubuntu here.

i believe that's the 1 to start with.
    It's easy and free to get (without any costs - no shipping, post)
    Its only about the 600 mb (i believe Cool )


And if u like linux you can download or buy (about $3,- per cd)
some other distro.
myrevolt
oh yeah knoppix has saved me many times. but be careful if you try to dualboot xp + linux (whatever your flavor), the main problems are caused when you try to resize your partitions...heh Mad partition magic left my hd unbootable, i had to use knoppix for about 2 weeks b4 i finally backed up and reinstalled. gentoo from what i heard is a good distro (once its installed) though it has something like a 6 hour install (non-automated). whichever distro you choose good luck Smile
DX-Blog
Knoppix is pretty crappy imho, for truly starting out I would advice mandriva. When it comes to functionality it's more like windows, so it's easy to get into linux quickly without getting stuck at the installation. Or without having to rely on a CD for your OS.
hack_man_
What is the best version of Linux? e.g. RedHat, Debian, etc.
anhstar
You can get SUSE, my company use it and it's very user friendly. With a sotfware management that you can use to install software and Firefox included Smile . And it's also theres a free version that you can download I think.

Google for SUSE if you want to have more details.
DRock
hack_man_ wrote:
What is the best version of Linux? e.g. RedHat, Debian, etc.


Personal opinion says there is no such thing, it all depends on how much work you want to put into it. If you are like me, just type one command/check one box and all the software (and it's dependency's) are download for you, then Ubuntu or Debian is a great one (ubuntu prefered) BUT, if you just want what is one the cd and nothing else, I suggest Fedora Core.

Both use different packaging systems. Ubuntu uses's .deb files, while Fedora Core uses RPM (redhat package management)

Try both out, and go from there. Any Q's, ask away.
magnusmoty
help lamer!!! photoshop will work on lunix?
lockwolf
devroom wrote:
Did not see any ubuntu here.


I have Ubuntu and I dont like it, I feel that some of the functionality of linux has been taken out of it. I highly Recomend Suse!
Helios
delete this one please
ocalhoun
For a beginner like yourself: SuSE or Redhat's new Fedora Core.

If you have a complicated hardware setup, by all means choose SuSE.
If you want to be able to install downloaded programs more esily, choose Fedora.

These Distros are easier to install and configure than any version of windows.
Platform
Mandrake, or most preferably Novelle SuSE.

These are easy to install, dual boot, get online music photos etc.

And SuSE does look good too, and in the future it will be even better...see previews of it....OS X copy of course but....

Go for it Cool
windval
I think Mandrake linux is the best for you~~

i am using it

it is a very good software
rocky
to start and keep an ease in using a linux distro a best choice would be mandriva/suse/fedora - those 3 have alot of graphic installers and configs, good hardware support and since they are around for quite a few you can find help fast in the linux comunity or user groups

...and yes, linux is FREE to download, distribute, copy and modify, you may pay for customer support or some specialised software (crossover office for example)
meaniegeanies
It depends on the use you want it for.

For general use, I found that SuSE Linux has a sufficient support for hardware and it is very similar with windows.

For advanced use, I would recommend a Debian distribution

For a cluster pc system, Knoppix

For a very small installation, PuppyLinux

For firewall, Stress Linux

and so on... Wink
AffroThund3r
This is probably a daft question but I have just ordered unbuntu.

Will I be able to install programs such as PhotoShop, InDesign etc.?

Thanks
kimrei
Suse is my no.1 because it runs with an interface probably more user friendly yet fairly similiar to windows and contains most of the more power orientated super features of linux hiiden in easy reach.

PS: You can emulate windows software with programs like wine and cedega (for modern games, it works brilliantly, unfortunately it has a price tag), I haven't used InDesign before so I'm not sure about that but, in the case of Photoshop The Gimp is a free equivalent that contains all the commonly used features of Photoshop aswell as many others.
Helios
Why 'god help me'?

Windows has the best interface and almost every program works on it.
Yes, I know that these 'viruses' are sometimes a pain in the arse, but Windows is the best OS yet.

Linux and windows have both their advantages and disadvantages.
Which I won't specify here(google).

But if you want to try Linux, that's cool.

I'm using Linux for over 2 years now and I'm quite happy with: www.debian.com .

It has the best Package Manager.
It's VERY stable and fast.
And most of Debian's wallpapers have pretty chicks on 'em Very Happy in red Very Happy

Good luck!
Vrythramax
I like Redhat myself, but have found that some of the Mandrake releases are easier to install on win32 platforms. It will find/dectect most of your hardware and configure itself for it...it even found and configured my modem on one machine...I have always had trouble in that area when installing any flavor of linux on a windows platform.

I'd be interested to hear how well (if at all) it (any Linux distro) works as a dual boot on a winXP machine....anybody tried?
zarky
The software is free.
You pay the media for the software if you want the company ship you the CD or DVD.
Also most important you pay the support. (This is how the company make money)
avk
Hey man

Linux is really free and opensource is really free
I think that linux is reallt good but really hard to use
I have installed both Windows XP and Ubuntu .
ubuntu is linux and i think that it is really good

I think that ubuntu is good for beginners
Jack_Hammer
You pay for certain distributions of Linux (They usually come with a custom installer (making it easier to install) programs (Professional programs like word processor etc.), they are about $70 usually (Though prices change and distrobutions vary).

Profesional Distros.
Red Hat Linux
Suse Linux
Mandrake Linux

Free Distros.
Suse Linux
FC4/5 (Fedora Core 4/5) Linux


There are a lot more to choose from than just those few, but Red Hat, Suse and Mandrake and the most popular distros.
Lennon
For convenience you really should stick with Windows for better and for worse coz it has more software to choose from. Anybody know anything about the new windows to be released from Microsoft?
dragonflame
zarky wrote:
The software is free.
You pay the media for the software if you want the company ship you the CD or DVD.
Also most important you pay the support. (This is how the company make money)


Im a fan of both OS's. What you might want to mention is the support sometimes cost as much as buying an MS OS. If you have the time to learn linux and search through documentation though, then yes, it's free. If youre planning to use it as a desktop, you might find yourself scratching your head finding drivers, and how to install stuff on whichever flavor you choose. it differs slightly depending what you try.

In the end, you never know until you try it. And it's definitely worth a try, so you can form your opinion and not just echo others. (I hate microsoft! I hate unix!, I hate apple! blah blah blah)
kimrei
It works perfectly (dual booting with windows).

A boot manager sorts out the OS selection at startup.

Linux can read FAT32 and NTFS filesystems.

The only pain is that windows can't read linux filesystems and linux can't write to NTFS drives without some tweaking (which works though the write speed is slow).

(linux has full read/write support for FAT32)
vinodmishra
You can get Ubuntu shipped to you for free. I got 10 Copies of it for free Smile .. If you want a pretty easy install go for SUSE or FEDORA. Mandrake is easier but it may not work in some cases. Fedora is my personal choice though.
Helios
Yes, for a beginner Fedora just rocks.
I had used it for 6 months and it was great, but I wanted to try somehting else, so I've moved to Debian.

Gonna try Gentoo soon(don't tell me how masochist I am).
coreygates
gentoo, knoppix, mandrake...those are the ones i have, if you have high speed its great, just download the iso's and burn em! i'm still new to linux but i really like it, wish i had some friends that lived close that knew even what linux is that could show me around, its alot different than windows at least for me
falconfx
Hi!

I suggest you to try ArchLinux, http://www.archlinux.org/. It's a bit more difficult than other distros, but it gets updated almost every day. And it's fast, very fast...

Finally, quoting R. M. Stallman: - Linux is - "free as speech, not as beer".
anurag_bhd
I think till now, you must be clear of the fact that most of the Linux distros are totally free of cost. I have spent much time trying the newest and latest distros. But believe me, the experiences were not always that good. Many-a-times my hard disk got totally formatted for the linux to be installed, at that time I was a novice. But as my experience built up, I became kinda expert in this field and concluded that you must try only the distro that is free of hassles of installing and are accompanied by GUI installation which are easy to install. Moreover, the distro must fit and adjust amicably with your other OSes like Windows.
So, I would recommend the following distros which I think are just for you:
1. SuSE 9.0
2. Xandros 3.0.1.Open Circulation Edition
3. Edubuntu(The Educational version of Ubuntu)

And certain live cds(which boot the OS directly from the cd/dvd wiithouy being installed on your hard disk), if you want linux only for fun or for exploration :
1. PCLinux OS
2. Gentoo
3. Knoppix

Hope you enjoyed reading my long-long "advice" without getting bored.
scyphon
Linux is definately one of the best operating systems around and for many reasons as well. The biggest reason for me is that it was free. I think that its always a plus. I have used many live cds and they all serve a different purpose for me. My favorite distro though is Mandriva. Currently I am using Mandriva 2005 LE which has a very easy to use GUI installation and can sit right next to any other OS (albeit separate partitions) and play nice. It also has a nice graphical lilo bootloader to handle dual booting. Explore2fs is a program that can let you view linux partitions and also pull files from them in windows. I am going to upgrade to Mandriva 2006 w/ PowerPack very soon.

Mandriva has excellent hardware detection. I have not yet had to find missing drivers except for my broadcom wireless chipset which isn't support natively by linux at all yet. I have a HP zd7000 laptop. Graphics, sound, and all of my other devices are recognized and work. Mandriva also uses the redhat package management (RPM) to install packages which is really simple to use. The OS comes with virtually everthing you need and adding new things are pretty simple.

I have never had a problem with Mandriva and I wouls expect that most users wouldn't. I don't plan to change to any other OS anytime soon and it is so complete that I only use windows minimally since Mandriva has everyhting I need.
charredii
maybe someone already said it, but definitley check out distrowatch.com and http://www.zegeniestudios.net/ldc/index.php?firsttime=true it's a distro chooser. Anyways, good luck hunting. If you every choose solaris, i might be able to help you as well.
Bastiecar2
If you want to Start with Linux I would say that you take Ubuntu Linux. It's fantastic. You can download a Live DVD to take a first look on it.
It's very easy to install, all what you need comes with and with the Debian Package managment you can easyily install new programs and update the programs you already have.

I testes it on an Centrino Laptop and it seem's to work out of the box with my WLAN. I can't test it any more because the Laptop get broken.

i wish you fun with the penguin.
dsauxier
Ubuntu is definitely a good choice. If you do go the LiveDVD route, just be aware that it is the slowest-booting live distro I've ever seen. That's about the only bad thing I can say about Ubuntu.
linuxuzmani
i think you should try pardus.It is very good.I am using pardus and it is really great.When the 2.0 realized it will be batter.

download adress:
ftp://ftp.linux.org.tr/pub/pardus/kurulan/1.0



it'is my screenshot Smile

Nolt
Yup. UBUNTU is the best choice for begginer and professional user. Is easy to use if u read all, few programs will help u like synaptic-auto searcher for packedges ?? im not sure this word is corretly Razz but who cares Very Happy If u want try u can send your request to free shipment and they send u a free copy of the UBUNTU Smile

EDIT: here are few mine screens Smile


oh0092
I think ubuntu is one of the bes linuxes.
ezekiel_rage
first of all i want to add that Linux is indeed "free". but not in the context of "free beer", rather when we speak of "free" we mean "freedom". Free in the sense that you (the user) are free to use it on any purpose you want, that you are free to look in the source of the programs and free to do modifications as you see fit for your purposes.

most linux distributions are indeed free as in free beer. But the majority of the commercial or rather Enterprise Linuces comes with a cost. and NO you cant just distribute these so called Enterprise Linux systems. You still have to PAY for licenses to use these.

personally i use Mandrake 10.2. very user friendly and even the advanced thingys are very easy to do.

I have used a lot of other distros, but i keep coming back to Mandrake. I am still in search for a replacement distro, though.

What i can suggest to you is not what distro to use, but for you test different distros and then decide for yourself what distro you want you stick with.


my 2 cents Wink
Petee
I've used several linux distros so far (And I intend to try out more as well). I'd say may favorite right now would be SUSE 10. It seems to work the best for me out of all the distros I've tried. Fedora Core 4 is also pretty good in my opinion.
zorindart
I like Mandriva very much.
I borrowed it from a friend (it's absolutely legal) and I installed it without any problem in less than one hour, and after that I had not only a complete operating system, but a lot of quality software instaled (Open Office, The Gimp, etc.)
Of course I share it with my old windows xp, but I'm using mandriva as far as much times.
charredii
LiveDVD boots slowly becuase the box has to load everything from the dvd, more data than a regular cd. Usually, it's a slower or same speed as a cd. Just the sheer amount of data you're loading is greater than a regular live cd. a Hard-drive is much faster than either cd or dvd drives.
kiranaghor
Ubuntu is the best ditro I ever used. It's perfect for a newbie. But u have to get urself ready to do some terminal 'type' work. It is really amusing. Believe me. The best part is Ubuntu has the wide range of hardware support. It comes for mac too. os x and ubuntu on an ibook is a great experience.
altec
I've tried Ubuntu, Suse 9, Xandros, and Lindows. All are great, for surfing, wordprocessing, Excel, email, the usual stuff. However, for games, graphic softwares like Coreldraw, Photoshop and etc., you'll have problems running it even under wine. Its just unstable.

I do hope they create something very close to windows, Lindows came close, but you need to pay for every software downloaded. The installation is like windows. No terminals, etc. Just point and click.
fiendskull9
Quote:
and be using a version of Debian right from the disc without installing anything.


Knoppix isnt debian....

Quote:
I feel some of the functionality has been taken out, I think SuSE 9.1 is the best!


WOW, im sorry, but if you know your way around, you can unlock those things....

a couple other reasons that suse is less full than ubuntu (not worse)

-Ubuntu installs gnome, you can get gnomes source right off there site, including a link to a tar file containing it

-SuSE install KDE, and only KDE (gnome is a bit hard to config on it). KDE is closed in, and its quite hard to get there source for it.

-SuSE uses RPM, when and RPM package has unsuffencient dependencies, it doesnt tell you what you need.

-Ubuntu of courses uses debian packages, therefore apt. when a debian package has unsuffencient dependencies, it lists every package you need to run the other package.

just my thought

-clay
photographerguy
I decided to try linux last week. I have never been so frustrated in my life. I am slow at work so I spent all 40 hours reading forums and using google to find out as much information as possible. I successfully installed with no problems (sometimes re-partitioning and always dual-boot with XP)

I installed:
Ubuntu
Fedora Core 4
Open Suse 10.0
Mepis

The installations went perfect-(easy with no problems)can't connect my laptop to my wireless router to access internet, and can't even install one simple program. I am about to give up. I thought I had a head start (I used to run Unigraphics on SGI, HP, Sun seats, so I had some Unix experience) Ubuntu is my favorite, it looks sweet and if I could just get my laptop to connect to the internet, I think it would be problem-free after that, but I haven't been able to so it is useless to me at the moment. I don't like windows, I love my Mac, and think I will like linux if I can figure it out, but I'm angry at the moment. Good luck.
fiendskull9
next to ubuntu, my second is definately Mepis....

although they didnt pioneer the idea of live cd install, they were the ones that made it catch on

3rd would be Vida (VLOS), its gentoo based, but uses anaconda (red hat installer), and has graphics that could compete with OSX.

google it sometimes

-clay
loosu
I would suggest SLACKWARE , as it is the best LINUX DISTRO ,
close to UNIX & also that , it is the most difficult for you to learn .

Since being difficult to learn , you will digg ur way through the NET , to learn .

Thus SLACKWARE , lets you learn more , thus more UNIX .

Once you get comfortable , with this one , you can see your productivity , increase and also , learning other LINUXes , will be
a piece o cake .

Shocked

www.slackware.com
fiendskull9
there is no best distro man

all distros use the same kernel, so they are all the same relation to unix

and learn other linuxs? perhaps other distros, but there is only one linux, and that is the unix based OS kernel written by Linux Torvalds in the late 80's.

-clay
jamez
i would suggest running first live cd like knoppix to make sure you have met the system requirements.. if it is, then i would suggest you using KUBUNTU.. get it from: kubuntu.org
fiendskull9
good thinking Smile

and if you have problems like, proscessor running at 90% and such (or even 30 and above)

then get Ubuntu, at ubuntu.org

the difference?

Ubuntu uses gnome WM, it uses much less cpu and ram

Kubuntu uses kde, which can but not always be a memory hog

but kde is most certainly ALWAYS going to tale alot of proscessor when opening things, switching desktops, and hovering their buttons, because KDE felt EVERYTHING needs animations.....

most of those things can be changed, the hover animations being easiest.

-clay[/u]
kiranaghor
Ubuntu always rocks !!!
They have great support system. and they are debian based.
kuisong.tong
For desktop, I suggest [url= http://www.ubuntu.com/]Ubuntu[/url].

Ubuntu Philosophy is that software should be available free of charge, that software tools should be usable by people in their local language and despite any disabilities, and that people should have the freedom to customize and alter their software in whatever way they see fit.

In the November edition of the Linux Journal, Ubuntu beat the more established distributions in this year's Reader's Choice awards.

For server, I usually use Redhat Linux advanced Server.
tobytobsen
Debia, absolutely!

But when you are a beginner, Ubunto, Redheas or Suse/Novell is a good choice to get started!

Toby
Qube
As was said earlier, Linux is absolutely free of charge.
The only way you'll pay is with support and other things (e.g. RedHat).

I myself have gone through an immense amount of time testing various distros.
The sad thing is, there is no "best" distro out there.
Just like flavors of icecream, it's all in your tastes.
What you want to do with it will ultimately decide which you choose.

I myself have become horribly addicted to Fedora Core 5.
Debian has been one of the leaders IMO.
I would show a screenie, but my comp is in storage.
It uses GNOME anyways, so you can pretty much figure out what it looks like.

For starting out, just like many others, I'd suggest running LiveCD's of SuSe or Ubuntu.
Those 2 are quite possibly the easiest to get running.
The only problem I had was SuSe didn't pickup my soundcard right away so I had to do it myself.

As for dual-booting, I run both OS'es perfectly fine.
Thank you GRUB.
I don't like having to update Lilo when I switch things or update.

All in all, Linux isn't where you want to go if you want ease.
You have to gain a bit of knowledge in command line syntax.
Also, compiling apps from source can be a pain when they don't offer pre-compiled packages.
Sucks if your distro doesn't come with GCC or other compilers for some reason.
I suggest sticking with Windows.
I absolutely HATE MS and its stranglehold on the PC market, but they did things right for the most part.

That and almost all software is produced for Windows.
Fortunately Linux has pioneered a few apps that are the counterparts to today's software.
Trade GIMP in place of Photoshop.
OpenOffice for Microsoft Office.
GAIM or Kopete for Trillian/AIM/MSN/Y!/etc. Msngr.
MPlayer/Amarok/Helix/etc. for WMP/Winamp/BSPlayer/etc.
And there's many others you'll find once you look around.

I say good luck.
Linux is awesome once you get everything configured.
Stable and fast, uses a hell of alot less space than XP.
Also Cedega and WINE can help you make the transfer if anything.
If there's anything else I forgot, feel free to ask/append.
01000101
my personal opinion towards the best linux flavor would have to be Slackware... ive had great experiences with it... but then again, im not big on the "pretty" linux distro's out there, id rather have a powerful stable box than one thats super userfriendly... ALL! x86 linux distro's are free, with the exception of packaged OS's (customer support and such) with retail box.... even redhat came out with the fedora project for x86 machines.. and suse recently released v10 as opensource and it came free in a Linux magazing that i bought.. id recommend something to start with such as SuSe or Slackware... RedHat is more oriented towards somewhat experienced users... or if you want something a little more pretty but with the same linux power, just buy a mac.. its better for x86 desktop use.

Pe@cE
nevillethenerd
It's not just financially free; it is more fundamental than that. The software is completely open, you can take the sources and modify them to do what you want. you have complete and total control. software doesn't get any freer than that.
lSaKenl
Definently Suse or Slackware, best window managers are KDE, GNOME and fluxbox ^^
polizey
i prefer ubuntu-linux, because of the best security like debian. ubuntu is free, easy to install and much comfortable at use. it has gnome gui. those who like the windows gui, can take kubuntu within kde gui.

and i take knoppix and kanotix as live linux, means a operating systems on cd. kanotix is for users having modern hardware and devices. it supports all the hightech...

and there is damn small linux, only 50mb - for usb-sticks

good shit!
ryanh2006
Hello there. I have used several distros in the past and I really recommend Kubuntu. They released a new version on June the first and it has great new features. Plus Kubuntu is really user friendly, has a great community, makes software installation a breeze, and its uses the beautiful KDE environment. Of course, the other guys here have always posted some great recommendations like knoppix and Slackware.
gazzanova
i prefer ubuntu because their forum (ubuntuforums.org)is great, have a problem, just go there and look up the solution
henrygl
[quote="DRock"]
photon wrote:
If you are looking for an easy to use and great forum community, i'd recommend Ubuntu linux. http://www.ubuntulinux.org to download, and http://www.ubuntuforums.org for support and help.

Also, if you like a windows feel to linux, try kubuntu. http://www.kubuntu.org


I could not agree more. I use Ubuntu and love it. It is, I find, the easiest, fastest, and safest operating system out there. The programming platform is excellent if you are into python or anything else, and the look is ultra customizable (take a look at www.gnome-look.org for themes+examples).

I also agree with the Kubuntu part. Kubuntu does give you an XP sensation while remaining free, good ol' reliable Linux. I found installing Kubuntu crowded up my destop a bit, but many people enjoy.

If you don't know about it, there is also Xubuntu:

Quote:
Xubuntu is a complete GNU/Linux based system with an Ubuntu base. It's lighter, and more efficient than Ubuntu with GNOME or KDE, since it uses the Xfce Desktop environment, which makes it ideal for old or low-end machines, as well as thin-client networks.


I've only used xubuntu on one machine, very old, and it seemed quite nice. Plus they have an awesome logo Smile . Well anyway, I hope I answered your question.

Cheers
lazaruslupine
anything debain based is a great idea for beginners. Damn Small
linux is one of my favorites.It fits on a a flash drive and can run entirely in ram. The newest version of ubuntu just came out yesterday, with 3 years of support and upgrades on the desktop! A good place to look is www.distrowatch.com to give you an idea of whats out there. Also a distribution on a cd, like slax or knoppix(also ubuntu) can let you boot the system from the cd without touching your hard drive.Its a great way to try linux before you commit.
grantmaster
Been running Breezy now for approximately 4 months.

The system has been up all of that time with no resets, no lockups, no software incompatibilities. I have installed some new programs, (DIA, VLC) and they have run fine without system restarts. The system hibernates perfectly and then comes back on when I press a key. It can hibernate for days and then still works perfectly when I need it. DVD movies can be left on pause for days and they start playing right away when I click play.

My Windows computer has been working like a piece of MS doggie doo. All of this after a system restore about 4 months ago. Sometimes, if a script has bombed from the internet, the whole system turns into a big pile of yellow snow, frozen until I physically pull the plug from the power supply. No other button on the system will work, what's up with that.

In the last 4 months I have repaired approximately 30 Windows computers (I'm a techician). They have mostly been windowsXP machines with various problems. Some of my clients are school districts and I cannot tell you of the monies that are lost each year to loss of productivity due to system failures, time spent on upgrades, and other updates.

It gives me a warm feeling to reach over and wake up the Ubuntu machine and realize that I (for one) am not a slave to Microsoft...

And also, the upgrade from Windows ME to XP cost $90, and so far everything on the Ubuntu computer has been free (it was donated by someone who bought a new computer when their Windows started to screw up)!
nizish
The answer to question 'which distro to use' depends on the type of person and what he'll use it for. IMHO, from ease of use to stability,

Knoppix, DSL, SLAX - A quick Live demo of Linux capabilities.
Mandrake - very much M$ Windows like, good for newbies
Fedora - Not for production
Ubuntu and Gentoo - Workstation
Suse Pro and Redhat - Commercial Server Grade
Debian - The true Free Server Class distribution

Most Linux companies distribute two flavours of linux, community and commercial edition. For some the community edition is testbed for inclusion of new technologies in their commercial edition. So you use the community edition and report bug, they fix it and include it in commercial edition. Some of the commercial versions may include proprietry software. So it's not Free Software.
root
Opensource does not mean software is free. It means that the software's source code is available, and if you wanted to, you could compile that source and essentially have that piece of software for free. There are cases though when software is opensource and not free.

My Linux reccomendations:

Gentoo if you want a source based Linux.
Debian if you want a binary based Linux.

If you think that using a source based Linux will give you significant increases in performance, you're wrong. Weigh those "increases" with the time spent having to compile the software. Use Debian.

And of course...screw Ubuntu.
quartz
Many years i have used RedHat/Fedora and now i have installed Ubuntu to test. Using it over 2 months but i dont feel confortable with it.

Im going to swhich back to Fedora 5.
kernel_geek
It really depends whay you like I would not recomend knoppix as an installed Linux distrubution a good one to start of with (mid way) is mandrake or suse. Alhough there are hundreads of distros, I use gentoo, witch is considerd to be advanced :p. Check out Distrowatch.org, until you find one that folllows your philosophy.
kernel_geek
Please excuse my poor english in the last post, I was typing it in a bit of a rush Smile.
nox-Hand
Linux. Linux can be edited all you want, and it is a lot more stable Very Happy


I use Linux now, as I got so tired of Windows Very Happy

nox-Hand
Dalector
i haven't read all the topic but take a look at distrowatch.com. In my opinion, fedoracore and opensuse are the best one (suse with kde looks like windows)
mhpschool
With the world of Linux probably only 6 months away from being able to provide me with all the software that I use on my Windows Machine....my official jump to Linux will come when I build my new pc in July.

I have tried out 20 different distrobutions in the past 5 years and by far I have found the Ubuntu family the most comprehensive and easiest to install, configure and use.

The Ubuntu family includes the latest version of Ubuntu, Edubuntu (a setup for schools/kids), and Kbuntu (KDE version). An awesome lineup that has a very shallow learning curve (my 6 year old could figure it out....literally)
nox-Hand
That is one thing people must remember when they install U/Ku/EduBuntu; They are the same. The only difference is what programs (packages) are installed. When you have Kubuntu, it only takes one command line action to get yourself Ubuntu (( You can also do it in the graphical program (package) installer, so it's really easy)) I currently have Ubuntu and Kubuntu on my PC, but I am going to uninstall Kubuntu when I get around to it.


nox-Hand
Rubbinio
Helios wrote:


Windows has the best interface and almost every program works on it.

Good luck!


Actually, OSX has the best interface, espcially all the Aqua effects and stuff beat windows by far.

As for Linux: I have been using Mandrake ( now known as Mandriva ) since verion 9, and the 2006 Mandriva is super cool. Very stable, easy to install, + toons of software for it. Not to mention that the driver support is super good. It installed all my drivers by itslef and the booted like a charm. So if you want an easy to install and maintain Linux i would go for Mandriva. I use Debian as my server but it is more complicated to maintain and install.
Seth
If Linux is what your after then I recommend Fedora core 5...
Ive used Knoppix, Suse, Red Hat, DSL, Mandriva (formerly mandrake) and a few other small distros..
and Fedora core is by far the best ive used so far...I have a HP nc6230 laptop and this OS worked with almost all my hardware right out of the box..And updating your system, finding drivers is a breeze..I can play UT2004 with no problems, and it looks grate..It also comes bundled with tons of open source software..almost every app youll ever need, and some youll never use either...
the downsides are: No MP3 support.(but that is easily fixed) and no Video drivers for ATI or Nvidia (also easily fixed) other than that I use it as my main OS and I love it..VERY stable..and it does everything i need it to do..I still use windows as an alt OS, but only to use my Recording and sound editing apps...Once the open source community catches up on the multimedia scene ill be a complete Linux user..with no reason to ever return to winblows!!!
lene
I'm using Kubuntu. This is Ubuntus with the KDE-Desktop. It's very easy to install and use. Kubuntu is based on Debian so you have also the rights-management without a root user. So you are always have to confirm changes in the system with the admin password. This is a little bit annoying at the beginning but so you haven't to log out and log in as root.
shenyl
I have donwloaded Debian and tried installing on my notebook, but realised that many drivers are not available. On checking with the site relating to my notebook, I discovered that it will not be able to support Linux. Linux can be free, but more updated hardware may end up only having a Unix console, rather than able to use a GUI Desktop.
bboy_nycb
Ubuntu is one the best choice you could make.
Check this out to see how important the customer support is :

ubuntuguide.org/wiki/Dapper
Atomo64
shenyl wrote:
I have donwloaded Debian and tried installing on my notebook, but realised that many drivers are not available. On checking with the site relating to my notebook, I discovered that it will not be able to support Linux. Linux can be free, but more updated hardware may end up only having a Unix console, rather than able to use a GUI Desktop.

what are you using? stable? just 'nano /etc/apt/sources.list' and change stable to testing. and then apt-get update && apt-get dist-upgrade && reboot

After that, just install xorg and install any other drivers you need.
JayBee
It depends.
    - If you are a clickachu I recommand you some distro like Ubuntu.
    - If you want tu use good and well-tested system, you can use Suse, Fedora or something like this
    - If you want to learn something about linux, you could use Gentoo



Next question could be, what window manager is the best Wink
because with all distros you can get almost same apps

I have tested all these distros and Ubuntu was the worst and Gentoo the best for me Smile
ashik
I know a friend who has been using Linux for about 6-7 years and he certainly likes it.... he will not change to windows even if some one threatened to kiill him....... coz of him, i started using Linux... i have to say... SUSE is the best i have seen so far...

i would certainly recommend SUSE Linux... OpenSUSE is a free version of suse... but if u want to suport Novell .. i suggest buy SUSE CDROM / DVD from them....

I also recommend Ubuntu who are new to Linux... its cooll, but there is a lot of work to be done to bring the system upto ur liking....
tziemba
Ubuntu is probably one of the easiest to switch to.
postbrutality
Well the best thing with those live cd is that you can't really destroy anything, in the worse way you just have to reset your computer and all your mistakes go away . It's really nice to learn how linux works, after this you should go toward redhat, suse or debian or... , there is not really better choice than other, it's all on the same kernel and you should choose the one you like the most, you're the one who better know which linux is for you. Wink
vicarious
There is no such thing as the best Linux distro. I have seen in this thread the advice of knowing how much hassle you want to put up with and what you want to do with it. That is good advice that I disagree with. Let me explain.

How much hassle you want to put up with. If you choose a lame distro because it was easy to install, then in the long run you will cause yourself more hassle during daily use. You don't want to marry a girl because she was easy, if you know what I mean. I agree that avoiding hassles is a prime factor in the choosing of a Linux distro, but I would like to add to think long term and not focus on installation. Before you wipe your hard drive and start an install I would suggest checking out the sever Live-cds that can be downloaded and burned from www.linuxiso.org . Find out what kind of desktop you feel comfortable for day to day use. Get online and find out if you can find all of the software you want in your distros of choice, and then narrow it down by bells and whistles that come in default installs. Then you will be ready to install.

What you to do with it.-
Games- Dual Boot w/Windows (all distros)
*Put pressure on Games writers to platform code for Linux release or work with WINE project

Watching DVDs- With any distro other than some commercial version distros such as TurboLinux with an included DVD decoder, you may have to get it to work yourself (hint. use google: dvd linux codec install)

Anything else-

Considering the before mentioned factors any distro will do unless you have a specific need for which you can find a special needs distro through linuxiso or other distro site.

I hope my 2 cents helps ( I have to admit I am unable to find the cent sign on my laptop keyboard at the moment)
Commando_Sondre
Quote:
Ubuntu is one the best choice you could make.
Check this out to see how important the customer support is :

ubuntuguide.org/wiki/Dapper
I don't agree. SUSE is just as good. Ubuntu isn't so good. Its a standard Linux-distro. If you want a real Linux distro, look at Slackware!
kd5nrh
tziemba wrote:
Ubuntu is probably one of the easiest to switch to.


Agreed, for the most part. I had really bad luck with Kubuntu, but regular Ubuntu does fine on my laptop. For my desktop, however, I use PCLinuxOS, so that I can still use some KDE-based stuff when I need to. Since the desktop's also somewhat newer and faster, I use remote X sessions to run a lot of apps from it on the laptop when I'm home.

There's also a WinXP partition on the desktop, and on a slower desktop in the other room, since my Brother all-in-one printer/scanner has no real support under Linux of any flavor. Since I'd have to go in there to get the printouts anyway, it's not that much harder to save docs on a shared drive, and print them from that machine.
bassgs_17
Man, I've been away for a while. As far as linux distros go, I reccomend Ubuntu/kubuntu or Open SUSE. Open SUSE running XGL is, in my experience just as pretty as the Aero Glass effects in Vista and is less of a system hog. Have fun, and remember, Aquastrike is back!
-aquastrike
urangkayo
Hi...

At now i using Fedora Core 5 and Ubuntu 6. I think this distro is very good.

If you new at Linux i recommended u to using Fedora Core or Ubuntu or Mandriva.

I think i want change my distro into Debian.

What do you think about Debian distro?

Can u give advice about this distro?

thanks
ilona
Hi!

I personally use Mandriva for many years now (what called Mandrake before). But I think that if you ask 100 different persons, you'll end up with 100 different Linux distributions!
The best thing you can do is to choose a (free) Linux distribution (you should not pay for packaging) and download it from the Web. Pick a distribution that is widely used as you will get more support for it and more (third-party) packages.

If you take a look at this Web site http://distrowatch.com/ you'll get a list of the many Linux distributions and an idea of their popularity.

Cheers!
ashik
well for people who dont have easy access to internet "may" find it difficult to switch to linux.. since it will take sometime to get all the packages and stuff running.... suse win there.. as it has a wide array of software coming with it plus most of dependency packages are taken care of....
ashik
suse is actually better than most of the OSs out there.... if u r looking for a pro OS to switch to from windows... i think its better than ubuntu...
goblinish
i would have to vote for opensuse. Its the only other system installed on my pc (apart from windows!) and it really does feel like a professional and swish environment to work in. Pratically every program you need to get work done on your pc is all there ready to use after install, and adding more stuff via yast online update is a breeze. Cool Since the release of 10.1 my ati graphic card finally works with 3d support too! Smile
eznet
Live cds def are good for trying the os but I dont like setting up swaps and save drives constantly.... Ubuntu does seem to have a good success rate for 1st time users... wasnt too long ago people were popping their proverbial linux cherry with Knoppix. I love Debian based systems, their package system is really nice (and really, in the end, thats what it will boil down to - the free software you have at easy, minimal click access) To date my favorite (and longest install) system has been Gentoo. It was a .... well I wont say what it was like to get it installed but fun and angel arent the words that come to mind. But I can certainly say, without that install it would have taken much longer to learn what I did in that one 30hr install (for those who dont know of Gentoo it compiles everything for each computer, each install - slooooow). As I said above, package system is where its at and Gentoo's portage was tha chrizonic. Like many others have said, I don't know that there is a "right" distro... there are pros and cons to each... kinda depends on your computer hardware and what you expect out of your hardware and OS - what you want out of the box anyways.... any of them can be made to do about anything if the right geek is present Very Happy
darkhallow
I used RedHat, Suse and mandrake. you should know ,what do you need ? what du want from OS, Security? Stability ? UserFriendly ? and for what place ?
urangkayo
darkhallow wrote:
I used RedHat, Suse and mandrake. you should know ,what do you need ? what du want from OS, Security? Stability ? UserFriendly ? and for what place ?


You're right, we must know for what Linux will be used, if you using for desktop myabe SuSe, Mandriva or Fedora is the best

If you using Linux for server maybe Debian, Slackware or Fedora is good
iron_trooper
i think the best distribution is the mandrake linux and red hat
chazcb
devroom wrote:
Did not see any ubuntu here.

i believe that's the 1 to start with.
    It's easy and free to get (without any costs - no shipping, post)
    Its only about the 600 mb (i believe Cool )


And if u like linux you can download or buy (about $3,- per cd)
some other distro.

I have to agree here. I've run a number of distros on a number of systems. By far the most successful and productive experience has been with Ubuntu. I'd say that this is mostly because of its advanced packaging system. Last week, I used Synaptic to flawlessly install a LAMP system on an old Mac G4 Cube. And I also have Ubuntu running on a Dell Inspiron. Basically, its a great distro.
tony
i dont suggest you pay for linux. the free distributions are just as good if not better than the ones which cost money. for beginners, a good free distribution is slackware - thats what i started on. it installs like any OS - just boot off the iso and follow the instructions...

http://slackware.com

when you are comfortable w/ linux you can move onto a more advanced and customizable distribution such as arch - http://archlinux.org
simp
Asking what is the best distribution is like asking what's the best religion - ask either question and watch the knives come out!

Each person should (and will) decide for themself. Just as in choosing a partner for a long term relationship, take your time - and shop around. Then decide for yourself and realize that you will probably change your mind many times, as you and the technology both change.

Here is a very good (probably the best) place to start:
http://www.distrowatch.com

By all means, thy the live cds. You can play around all day and won't damage your computer. If you access your hard drive though, you CAN thoroughly trash your data, which is infinitely worse!

And if you possibly can, dedicate an old second hand computer to your experimentation, and go crazy! You are abiout to start on a great adventure that just might last a lifetime. I envy you.
turbohead
1. Interest
2. Patience
these are the only you should get to use linux
lookahead
To start as a beginner U can prefer Mandrake (now mandriva) Linux. With its new GUi most features are similar to windows and its is also user friendly.
pandmatrix
dude, if u r searching for good linux...
go for.. SUSE 10.. its very nice with all functionalites that any other linux provides, plus nice media support n its most user friendly linux,as far as i know...
ammonkc
Ubuntu is very user friendly for someone new to linux or someone thinking about switching from say windows. But I gotta recommend SUSE 10.x. Its really robust, and there is a lot of support for it. I also like that SUSE is really actively being developed. which means constant updates and improvements.
ciaran27
If you are looking for a nice linux system, and are willing to put a little work into learning how it is built, get gentoo.

Gentoo is unique from the other linux distributions in that it does not use binary packages as it's primary software medium (they are available if you want them though) Gentoo uses a system called portage developed in the BSD community. BSD invented it and Gentoo perfected it Smile

Portage allows you to install a piece of software, and all the other libraries and software it depends on from source code with one command. The advantages to this are that every piece of sftware is built on your machine, optimized for your machine, and has only the features enabled that you want, nothing more. This results in faster performance, more free system resources, and more free drive space.

There are 3 ways to install gentoo, stage 1, 2, and 3. A stage 1 install compiles the operating system asa whole from source code. Stages 2 and 3 eliminate some of the initial compile steps by using binary packages. The advantage to doing a stage one install is that you will build your system from source. You will know your system inside and out, because you built it. All one has o do to perform a stage one install is to follow the gentoo handbook.

After your system is installed, all one has to do to instal just about any opensource software out there is open a command line and type "emerge <program>" Portage will then automaticly download, configure and compile the source code for that program and all of it's dependancies. What could be easier?

Gentoo is easier to maintain, and far more streamlined than any of the package based distros. The documentation on the gentoo website is far more complete than the other distros out there. Bottom line is Gentoo Rocks Smile

Check it out. http://gentoo.org

Ryan
turbohead
If you are new to linux, ubuntu maybe a nice one.
Mannix
Having tried alot of them, ubuntu is by far the easiest one I tried. After using suse, mandrake, redhat/fedora and a few others I can't remember, I prefer using Fedora. Though I've heard that slackware beats all of them for flexibility.
wetumka_ok
I Currently Use Fedora Core 5, and Centos, true linux is open source, but I don't think it's absolutly free! True you may download an Iso, or Ubuntu can send you a disc, however if you use their products, you should be obliged to support them by some donation!, monetary, technical support in the forums, or promoting the product, you don't have to send cash just help support in some way you can.
eznet
It is all about preference....

It is funny taking notice of the reoccurring themes here. We (myself included) are saying pretty much the same (or very similar) thing(s). Obviously Ubuntu, by sole numbers alone, seems to be the easiest and smoothest to test the waters with. From here preference picks up. As many have pointed person preference often times is based around personal computing needs. People tasking with IT and CS specific computing desire more advances or specialized distros due to their ability to customize and configure to a specific need or function. An example is the immense popularity of Debian based systems for servers (like many based on the LAMP configuration – such as the popular DIGG.). Another example, this an even more specific distro, would be something such as bioKnoppix which is a Knoppix based distro specifically geared towards Molecular Biologist.

Truth of the matter is that it really, truly does boil down to pretty much one thing…. Preference… desire… determination… dedication… okay, so that’s not exactly one thing but I think you get the point…. Each distro is different, each one is really, really good at one thing (at least). Most all distros are easier than others in at least one specific use/function. Linux will do what you make it do. With that said, it is easier to do some things with some distros that are very difficult in other distros. The distro decisions should be based on your learning curve and free time and of course intended primary use. You have to weigh what it is that is most important to you in your os.

My recommendation, and it is one that at least a few other readers in here would probably support who have toyed with linux for the past several years, if you have a long weekend and are sufficiently smart enough to read, pay attention to, and follow directions grab a distro of slackware or Gentoo (I recommend having a 2nd computer and/or printing out the entire manual/faq(s) as it can get difficult). By the end of your first successful install you will fell as if you actually learned something about linux and its MAJOR DIFFERENCES from windows. Aside from this, I would suggest playing around with Ubuntu, Kubuntu or any LIVE CD (especially KNOPPIX). I am obviously a wind bag and a half and hold no experience outside of personal.. My only credentials is my personal experience in linux since roughly the fall of 98 with many current and now long gone os distros.

If you really want an OS check out BEOS…kidding… ok, not really, but yea… kidding. Kidding aside... check out distrowatch for the scoop on most all distros.
tonk
Ubuntu is the best.

-It is based in Debian thath for me is the best big&known distribution.
-It is easy for new users.
-They ship CD to you at not cost.
-Comercial support available.
-Growing community.
-Kind and helpful community.
-You cand find a lot of support in the web.
-Many and understable documentation included.
-Easy acces to sourcecode.
-Freedom and community spirit.
-Canonical supports it, and Debian in the backward.
-Long Term Support.

I think Gentoo, ututo XS, and Slackware are good because you can compile everything easily, but this features in these distributions are based in ports, so in that case I prefer Desktop BSD, or Open BSD or maybe ututo.

In Ubuntu you can use apt-build to compile everything, for me ubuntu is the best linux distribution for servers, desktops, and laptops.

www.ubuntu.com
knullasvensk
I use puppy linux and it worked wonders for me (as I am technology impared haha)

I like it better than windows, but maybe that's because I got a punkload of viruses last year and I have been scared ever since.

Who knows...different things work better for different people I guess.
crasso
Just remark, I think the majority knows that but there's somebody who doesn't: Linux is just the name of the kernel, GNU/Linux is the operating system. So distro are the distro of the GNU/Linux, not just Linux.
Jaan
My favourite has always been Debian.
Once mastered, it is very easy to use, though a friend of mine said, "linux is just a computer game"
shaggly
So far I've tried Xandros 4.0 premium, SuSE 10.0, Ubuntu, and Kubuntu 6.06 (Dapper).

I would have to say that, thus far, out of all of them I am very much leaning towards Kubuntu. It seems to be the most user-friendly package that I've tried, both in terms of "out of the box", and also in terms of customization.

Of course, I've only been rediverted back into the Linux world for a few weeks, after quite a long "absence" from the scene, so I still have a lot more experimenting to do and I'd pay more credence to those guys that have been constant in their testing over a longer consistent period.
kcw1304
I just recently installed Ubuntu on my laptop in addition to Windows. I am not a computer guru but managed to figure out the dual install. Its very easy to use coming from Windows and pretty easy to install- I found instructions on the internet. The only problems that I've had are making my printer work with it and the office suite isn't quite as useful as the MS Office. Other than that I love it!
ashik
ubuntu tend to do that to u... sometime.. they dont give real good hardware support .. right out-of-box.. but SUSE does not have this prob... if u ever watn to change... i think suse is a reall good option...
wimvpetegem
My favorite distrobutions is Mandrake, but that's totally personnally.
So it's almost all up to you...
But Mandrake is also for beginners very good, and also for experts it is a fine distrobution, so... Give it a try. Wink
nata_ratero
i don't like mandrake because of all that "FREE EDITION" stuff, and i wouldn't pay to someone that is re-inventing the wheel..

Ubuntu is my choice .. umm, Kubuntu. Wink

KDE is a good choice. (dont like GNOME)

don't know what distribution to choose?

then use FreeBSD Evil or Very Mad (still prefer linux)
Raijenki
I ever used the Windows XP in a partition and the *nix system in another one...
I used the another partition to use Red Hat and recently, Slackware, I really like Slackware, use it with you want to use the unix for Servers...
THE11thROCK™
Nothing beats Linux for freeware. I had Red Hat and Linspire but I guess I would stick with Ubuntu. KDE in Ubuntu is great-looking and customizable, but freeze-ups (in my experience) in KDE or Kubuntu made me shift back to GNOME or Ubuntu. Ubuntu rules.
angel_of_death
SNES350 wrote:
I recommend trying http://www.knoppix.org/ (site defaults to German, just select the flag that is half of the U.S. flag and other half is Britain), it is downloadable as a CD image (the latest one is a DVD image though) that you can burn, then put it in a computer, restart, and be using a version of Debian right from the disc without installing anything.



what is knoppix. i have a cd but havent tried it yet. how is it different from linux. Sad
ashik
suse could offer a better experince..... i wud also recommend linspire or knoppix , debian.... ubuntu.... u have to depend too much on the net..... Sad
jrs32
Personally my favorite linux OS is Ubuntu. It is free, and has some great programs and options.

They can even ship you some nice CDs as well. Basically as many as you need! Check them out, I believe it is www.ubuntu.com
prongs_386
I currently use fedora core 4.... yes I should probably update..

In a few weeks I'll be redoying my lan server and wondering which is the best linux to choose for running network services etc. I still want the gui though Wink
Also, what would people say is the most refined linux system? every linux system I've used has had something annoying about the gui. Eg. mouse clicks don't always work, right click menus slow... lots of little stuff like that. I would be interested in running a linux that runs really smoothly with no hassle.
ashik
if u r looking for a real nice linux.. i wud say go for SUSE PRO... i have seen REDHAT advanced server , Enterprise linux.. i shld say. they are awesome.. but i dont know abt their cost.. better use a linux that u feel comfortable with... coz almost all linux distros have the capability of managing a LAN
malcolmiles
My favourite is ubuntu which you can do everything I want windows and mac to do and it hasn't cost me a penny, they even post you the disc for free (+ five others to give to friends),

Freespire also looks interesting- totally open source but made by linspire to be easier than windows
cybernerf
If you just want to try linux without installing it... you can try KNOPPIX... But like ubuntu and other linux distributions, you can use the LIVE CD to have an overview to what it looks like when installed in system...

If your looking for desktop linux, try using Ubuntu because it is much user friendly than others
01000101
DEBIAN / KNOPPIX ... if you want a good sturdy secure OS.. go w/ the new Knoppix LiveCD 5.0 .. i use it and it works like a charm. it has multiply WM's so you dont have to stick to KDE, and a BUNCH of software to accompany it. Truely a good Open Source OS.
anathema
Debian
and Knoppix Live CD Smile
ashik
Debian comes with all the packages... so not to worry.. i had a tough time customizing... coz thre is a lot... i really like it.... but they have such a ling release cycle... Sad
4ndY
For new linux users i definitely recommend ubuntu and kubuntu (with necessary automatix installed). Ubuntu and kubuntu are the easiest Linux distributions I every tried.
wicke
All Linuxes aren't 100% free (Red Hat, Suse...) but most of them you can't also get free. Debian based Linuxes like Debian and Ubuntu are 100% free and if have understood right you can get CDs in free also and you don't need to download it at all but CD Shipit is very slow way to get Linux. It takes few weeks to get CDs.

If you want Debian based Linux, I think that Ubuntu is better for beginners and it's easier to use. Someones think that Debian is better because there is more packages avaible for it but Ubuntu's packages is very often more high quality than Debian packages and some Debian packages can also work with Ubuntu (I used ZSNES for Debian on Ubuntu and it worked correctly but installation gave me few error messages).
bulek
I'm using Fedora Core 5 any I'm very happy for it. I recommend it for begginers.
sky217
I'd also like to post my vote for Debian. I really don't think the learning curve is that much more than any other distro - especially now that the installer is working better.

I have to agree that Knoppix is a wonderful alternative to try things out or troubleshoot. It's saved my data many times being able to boot to Knoppix, chroot, and fix whatever I broke while messing with stuff I shouldn't have.
tar-xzv
Hi,

There are too many really!!! I started out with Mandrake, moved to Debian i think and then to Fedora core. I favor Debian because of apt-get pkg manager. I've tried suse and ubuntu and many others, including live CD's. My suggestion, do start with the easy ones to install, do format, it does damage your hd in a certain way, but you have to install and then format, and start all over again Smile. It's a whole process of learning. Orrrrrr, too many replies, maybe I'm repeating, install VMware on your windooze machine and go crazy with experimentating. Don't forget to add your box to http://counter.li.org/

Good luck
5ani
Simulator
I think Mandriva (Mandrake) is the best to start off with, its easy and simple to install, though first time off I couldn't get my head around it, but it is easy enough with the news ones, start off with Mandriva One, you boot into it from the CD, or Live CD, and then you can install it from the desktop, couldn't be any easier, but it does not come with all the extras you would like it too, but you could always go for Mandriva Free, its on a DVD or a few CDs, but slightly harder to install.....
Hardrive
For nwebies in Linux, the best is Ubuntu Dapper Wink

bye
Scoria
Why should I get linux?
How do I get it?
If I get it, can I still keep windows?

Thanks ahead, new to this things.

//JOhan
Daniel15
My favourite distributions are Debian and Ubuntu. I mainly use Debian on servers, and Ubuntu on desktops.

Quote:
Why should I get linux?

You'll feel good knowing that Microsoft isn't controlling you Very Happy. Seriously though, if you're tired of paying Microsoft, and getting viruses, you should try Linux. It's completely free, and viruses aren't really a threat Smile. There's large support forums to help you if you ever have trouble (www.ubuntuforums.org being one of them). Also, installing software is easy in Ubuntu - Just open the package manager (Synaptic Package Manager), select what you want to install, and then apply the changes. It will download and install everything you need Very Happy

Quote:
How do I get it?

Go to http://www.ubuntu.com/ and click on the 'Download' link. If you don't have a fast internet connection, you can request for some free CD's to be sent to you (they are indeed free, but take a few weeks to arrive)

Quote:
If I get it, can I still keep windows?

Yes, the installer will detect that Windows was installed. Once installed, when you boot up, it will ask you whether you want to start Windows or Linux Smile

Quote:
For nwebies in Linux, the best is Ubuntu Dapper

Yep, definately Smile
suicidalsam
hack_man_ wrote:
I currently have Windows XP (god help me) and want to change to Linux. I know that Linux is open-source, but does that mean that it is free? I have no idea on the matter so I decided to consult the forums.

EDIT: New question. See topic title

Stickied by Animal - 31 May 06



xp sux man.m$cro$oft installed wga on my pc n its been giving me a lot of headache.
i have used ubuntu(http://www.ubuntu.com) n fedora (http://fedora.redhat.com/)
i like ubuntu a lot

here r some useful linux sites

http://www.distrowatch.com

http://archlinux.org/

http://knoppix.org/

http://en.opensuse.org/Welcome_to_openSUSE.org

http://www.gentoo.org/


suse is a good but heavy distro to download
ubuntu is a light distro
Scoria
Daniel15 wrote:
My favourite distributions are Debian and Ubuntu. I mainly use Debian on servers, and Ubuntu on desktops.

Quote:
Why should I get linux?

You'll feel good knowing that Microsoft isn't controlling you Very Happy. Seriously though, if you're tired of paying Microsoft, and getting viruses, you should try Linux. It's completely free, and viruses aren't really a threat Smile. There's large support forums to help you if you ever have trouble (www.ubuntuforums.org being one of them). Also, installing software is easy in Ubuntu - Just open the package manager (Synaptic Package Manager), select what you want to install, and then apply the changes. It will download and install everything you need Very Happy

Quote:
How do I get it?

Go to http://www.ubuntu.com/ and click on the 'Download' link. If you don't have a fast internet connection, you can request for some free CD's to be sent to you (they are indeed free, but take a few weeks to arrive)

Quote:
If I get it, can I still keep windows?

Yes, the installer will detect that Windows was installed. Once installed, when you boot up, it will ask you whether you want to start Windows or Linux Smile

Quote:
For nwebies in Linux, the best is Ubuntu Dapper

Yep, definately Smile


Ah, thanks a lot man. IM gonna look into linux. One thing, if I got lots of files on linux and windows, would that not make my computer slower, since I got like twice the files, and two hardrices?
Isnt it better to keep it all at one?
Gonna check it out, thanks again.

Sincerly,
Johan
KD8CPP
I would go with Red Hat or SuSe. SuSe is my favorite when it comes to setup and administration. Check local libries, as they might have a copy on cd. I know ours does


73s

Tyler Lewis
Antek88
Ubuntu is my favorite linux
true_friend
same is mine.
but kubuntu. i like KDE yum yum
big_matt13
i'd personally go for a distribution of fedora core
Soulf
I think from my little experience with kernel based operating systems, that the Ubuntu edition is the most flexible and easy to use linux for human beings!! The Idea and concept of the ubuntu is original and could end the misconception people have about kernel based OS!
ashik
has anyone got their hands on fedora core 6 .... i think its still in beta.. but if u guys get it let me know
SurBiff
if you want a stable and easy distribution.
Go for Ubuntu Linux

the Kubuntu, xubuntu, edubuntu goes under the same repositorys so it doesnt matter what you install, you can have all 4 installed at the same time, no problems Very Happy
goblinish
I take back everything i said about suse linux being my favourite! Just installed Mandriva 2007 today and i can only say `wow`...
This is the first linux i have used which sets up absolutly everything i have automatically and works a lot quicker than windows xp and also has some amazing 3d desktop effects at its disposal.. All multimedia works straight after install i.e. mp3 playback, divx playback, dvd playback.. This is going to be my main os for a while now i think Smile
TheCyrus
Mandriva's a great distro.

If you ever feel like switching SuSe/openSuSe is good, as well as anything ending in 'Buntu'

Good luck!
bongoman
I have tried a handfull of linuxes and imho its a tossup between suse and Fedora Core. Suse I would say is a great deal more polished, with tools like yast2 (which I know some people hate and some love) Fedora on the other hand has a great deal more online support and comes with a whole lot more software on the dvd. I have also dabbled a bit with Ubuntu which is a great distro if you're starting out with the operating system and just wish to try things out (and they'll ship you a free cd in the mail). Gentoo as well is an interesting concept it runs very fast I don't reccomend it if you're just getting into it as every piece of software for it has to be compiled from scratch. I don't see what linspire has that much to offer among the pack and I am generally not that fond of it because of its whole history from being Lindows and then suddenly not being lindows (but that's a whole other story) Debian is also worth trying because it comes with tons and I mean tons of software included ( I believe if it has the largest open source software collection) though its lack of a graphical installer may turn off alot of people (though I hear thats in the works at the moment) certainly Debian though is well known for its stabilty and security as an O/S (because of the fact that its development cycle is a good while longer than some of the other distros out there) All in all I would say its really a matter of preference for each person for simplicity i'd reccomend Ubuntu, for those wanting eye candy Suse, and for those wanting great support i'd say Fedora.
amanatali.goher
I think uBuntu is easy for invoice as uBuntu for humans Smile
webapp
I use UBUNTU....its great....You can get free CDS from their site...

www.ubuntu.com
4ndY
Can someone with the experience compare Fedora Core and Ubuntu?
Ubuntu is getting more and more popular (couse user-frendly), but Fedora is more "linux" OS then Ubuntu. What you think?
rooney
I asm using Ubuntu - it is good and free
jabol
differences between Fedora and Ubuntu... lets think:
Fedora Core is a project that got out of Red Hat after some changes in Red Hat license. It`s quite popular and few years ago loads of servers were running on Red Hat, because it was good.
IMHO Red Hat or Fedora are unnessecarily integrated with desktop environment Gnome. you can do everything using Gnome and this way it`s harder to really learn using Linux.
Ubuntu is based on Debian but is much simpler. Ubuntu is little messy with stable releases and a bit hard even to install but it`s fans say that it is (after install) the best distribution. Ubuntu omits most of Debian problems, it`s easy to install (from only one CD with almost everything you may need), pretty configurable and quite good in performance.
IMHO Ubuntu is one step closer to "perfect" linux, but still quite far.

but what is my point of view? well, i`m computer user with quite big expectations. i want to have much of functionality from windows (because i need to use windows programs sometimes) and good performance. for me, the best linux is one which i can fully customize, that will be set to work with my hardware.
the best thing here is, for me, Gentoo. installation is a bit complicated but documentation is very good so even beginner shouldn`t have any problems. the best thing in Gentoo is compiling softwre exactly for your hardware, with full dependency check etc. for people who really want to have "their own linux", there is Linux From Scratch, project that allow you to build your linux from very beginning.
another good linux is Slackware, one of the oldest and still maintained by one man, that`s why it`s pretty well standarized, and quite good for the beginning for someone who want to learn using linux. another good thing in Slackware is similarity to BSD systems, that`s why change from Slack to BSD or other Linux is no problem.

summarizing:
if you want to have "easy-going" linux i can advise Ubuntu
if you want to learn more about linux try Slackware
if you want to have well customized linux try Gentoo
if you want to have extremely customized linux try Linux From Scratch
THE11thROCK™
Ubuntu Edgy here. Kubuntu for KDE and for techies, go for Nubuntu.
ashik
Ubuntu and its variants is really cool.. i have used them except for xubuntu... but sometimes.. u will feell overly dependent on the internet to get some packages... (dont know if i am the only one with that prob...).

otherwise its a cool OS...

But if u r reconsidering ... theni seriously recommend.. Suse... I personally like it.. better than fedora core... Wink
Daniel15
Just a note that Ubuntu 6.10 is now out... One thing I noticed was that it boots up a lot faster than 6.06 did Smile
But yeah, if you want to install Linux, Ubuntu would be my pick Very Happy
bulek
Try Fedora Core and Ubuntu. They are the best for everydays work.
jon9314
kubuntu is a good linux to use easy to setup and update.
makak
I use Ubuntu, for me this is great distro, in future i want install Slackware, but now there is for me to hard Wink
ashok
actually all of the linux distros are free. if you pay for it, you usually get a commercial edition complete with free upgrades, technical support, installation help etc. .. i purchased redhat.. pretty cool it is
nothingXelse
Vector Linux is sweet. But I prefer LFS, Linux From Scratch. It's kind of like Gentoo only it isn't guided like Gentoo with an installer. I have complete control over the system because you compile everything. I like my system minimalistic, preferably with Flux.
moskito
I use at home Ubuntu because it's really easy to install, just click 5 times in the next button. But I don't think that it's the best distro, olny do what want in a easy way.

Test all distros you can, first you should read about what you'll test and discard any distro that dont do what you need.
zipdaman12
Hello All,

I have tried every flavor ofver teh past few years (I was employed by a linux development company) and I say for an XP convert, the best choice is Fedora core. The main reason for this is that they have a great pavckage management system called yum. It handles all dependencies. For those that don't know what "dependencies" are in Linux, thinnk of them as pieces of teh application. If you want to install mplayer for instance, you would have to get the rpm for your flavor and version of Linux as we all all of its associated parts (dependenceies) Yum takes care of dependencies for you. So, you can issue a command as root like:

root $ yum install mplayer

and it will get all that is needed and install it.

My 2 cents,

Jack
jabol
zipdaman12, in Gentoo you also have very powerfull automatic package management tool. it`s called Portage, and also takes care of dependencies. it also gives you *stable* software, tested for your architecture. so if for you, "an XP convert", simplicity is in typing fewer words to do something automatically try
emerge mplayer
as root in Gentoo
nothing easier Smile
solarwind__
Get Kubuntu. It is based on Ubuntu (the most popular Linux distribution, but has a nice interface called KDE (which is also more popular)).
Daniel15
Since lots of people have said that KDE is good, I'll try it out later Smile. I downloaded Fedora Core 6 today (as my Internet bill is done on the 5th of each month, and I have about 14 GB left this month, which means that I can use 14GB in the next two days Razz)

Quote:
The main reason for this is that they have a great pavckage management system called yum. It handles all dependencies. For those that don't know what "dependencies" are in Linux, thinnk of them as pieces of teh application. If you want to install mplayer for instance, you would have to get the rpm for your flavor and version of Linux as we all all of its associated parts (dependenceies) Yum takes care of dependencies for you. So, you can issue a command as root like:

root $ yum install mplayer

and it will get all that is needed and install it.

Yeah, Debian and Debian-based systems (such as Ubuntu) have a similar system, APT.
Code:
apt-get install mplayer
Wink
ashik
14GB,,,,,, Shocked wow....

after u try fedora 6.. plz tell me how it compares with UBUNTU 6.10...
Daniel15
ashik wrote:
14GB,,,,,, Shocked wow....

Yeah, my Internet plan has 20GB per month, and the Internet bill comes on the 5th of each month.

Quote:
after u try fedora 6.. plz tell me how it compares with UBUNTU 6.10...

Yep, once I install it, I'll tell you what it's like.
Note that nothing will make me change from using Ubuntu as my main Operating System. I just downloaded it to try it out Wink
wangbu
Hello

I'm new to linux, i install fedora core 5 in my system and I like it but I got problem installing plugins in firefox, macromedia flash player to be exact, the installation is sucessfull but when i try to use it the browser still say need to install missing plugins, can anyone help me?
STYLAN
Your monthly plan is 20 gb per month i cant believe it???
ok whats the charge?
i just have 10gb for 6-8 months
STYLAN
I am facing a lot promblems installing applications on linux.My linux is ubuntu 6.06.I cant install anything,Its totally internet depended.
Another promblem is that my internal modem is not supporting linux.
ashik
well stylan (i know a person named stylan.....is that u...?) Wink

Internal modems are actually called win modems as they are made to work in Windows.. they are not actually complete modems most of the modem part is handled by software drivers. So they are also called soft-modems..

Most of the Internal modems wont work with Linux at all... but there are some which u can get to work with some tinkering...

If u knwo which company made ur modem, u can go to their website to see if they have relased Linux drivers for ur internal modem
STYLAN
Ashik iam the one.You guessed right.Thank you for the information.
Can you suggust some other versions of linux,which i can use.
I have heard of some such as fedora,suse,ubuntu....
which is the best one.
Arno v. Lumig
I am using Ubuntu 6.06 (Dapper Drake) right now, and I love it. It's not the first Linux distro I'm using, I've had Mandrake and SuSe before, but I never really used them.
I was wondering if it's possible to update to 6.10 without having to reinstall everything.

An other option is to try a whole new distro, but I want to remain the flexibility and simplicity of Ubuntu.

Thanks in advance,
Arno
Daniel15
Arno v. Lumig wrote:

I was wondering if it's possible to update to 6.10 without having to reinstall everything.

Yep, that's quite simple. Run this in a Terminal (Applications --> Accessories --> Terminal)
Code:

gksu update-manager -c -d

You should see a message about Ubuntu 6.10 being available. Click the 'Upgrade' button, and it will download and install the upgrade Smile
Arno v. Lumig
Mmm.. That did not happen. It just started the update-program which told me I was up-to-date...

Thanks anyway,
Arno
ashik
well Suse is the current best... many people including me consider it to be the best linux ... I think u shld wait for the Suse 10.2 stable release.. they say it has cool 3d desktop features.. somewat like Vista aero glass....

mandriva 2007 and fedora core 6 looks good.. but havent got my hands on them .. when i do i will be sure to give it 2 u.

If u want to catch up on latest Linux duistro news.. u shld goto

www.distrowatch.com

they have info on almost all of the latest linuxes.. and they have an ongoing poll which tells u which are the hottest linuxes around.. be sure to check it out.. Smile

PS:- if u wanna try a free version of SUSE.. called OpenSUSE.. head on over to

www.opensuse.org
Daniel15
Arno v. Lumig wrote:
Mmm.. That did not happen. It just started the update-program which told me I was up-to-date...

Thanks anyway,
Arno

I typed it out slightly wrong. The real command is:
Code:

gksu "update-manager -c -d"

See if that works for you Smile
angelussum
I just started using ubuntu and I love it! Some minor difficulties moving from a Windows background, but I'm really glad I made the change. I chose it because it sounded like one of the better beginner linux OS that were pretty light.
Arno v. Lumig
Thanks Daniel15, that worked, the problem I have now is that the menubar and taskbar are not displaying. The upgrade to 6.10 went all fine, except for this.

Anyone knows why this happened?


Greetz,
Arno
queroweb
I have tried a lot of linux distributions(Fedora, Suse, Mandriva,,Debian,Ubuntu) and finally I am using ubuntu now, it's easy, customizable, and stable.
vandetta
I started Linux with Redhat 8 and until now already try many distro such as Suse, Mandrake, uBuntu, knoppix.. and for me, I like Fedora.. But if for beginner, I would suggest Suse.. it almost a complete OS, I think Smile
Konquerror
Well I have tried Fedora Core 2,3,4,5,6 , Mandriva 2006,2007, Ubuntu and Debian...but liked Debian...its easy to configure and use...
hadiwijoyo
Slackware and Trustix
Daniel15
Arno v. Lumig wrote:
Thanks Daniel15, that worked, the problem I have now is that the menubar and taskbar are not displaying. The upgrade to 6.10 went all fine, except for this.

Anyone knows why this happened?


Greetz,
Arno

Sorry, I'm not sure. You're best off asking at the Ubuntu Forums: http://www.ubuntuforums.org/

Quote:
Well I have tried Fedora Core 2,3,4,5,6 , Mandriva 2006,2007, Ubuntu and Debian...but liked Debian...its easy to configure and use...

Yeah, I use Debian on my server... It's very easy to use Smile. The only bad thing about Debian is that their stable releases don't come out too often (which is why I use the latest 'testing' version).
Jaan
Is anyone else running Debian here?
I have just started and am enjoying it very much. I have just installed KDE, but today I will install XGL and Compiz for the advanced features. However, Debian is about stability Razz.
What do you think of Debian? Or are you on another linux?
I am running dual-boot because of the no-gaming in linux.
Studio Madcrow
The new version of Debian (the "testing" one or whatever) seems to be quite nice. It looks like they FINALLY have some graphical configuration stuff and a decent setup system to compare with YAST or Mandriva's program or Fedora's suite.
{name here}
I personally had a bad experience with debian. I used freebsd for a while then only to realize that I had it best with Win2K.
Traveller
Merged the topic, "Debian???" into this existing thread where it belongs.

Please search before mindlessly creating duplicate topics.
Daniel15
Quote:
It looks like they FINALLY have some graphical configuration stuff

I hate graphical setups. I'd prefer text based installers as (strangely enough) I find them a lot easier to use. Also, they're a lot quicker, and work well on older PC's.
deneb.star
Personnally I am a Fedora Core user.
I have bought my own servers to conducts my experiments at home and for my own training (Bi Pro Xeon dual core + 2 Gb RAM, 500Gb RAID5).

What I can tell you is that multi processing was not very well supported untill FC4. RHEL 4.0 and FC5 have proven very stable.

Attention, if you like to play on your PC you have to install a microsoft virtual machine on you linux installation for your games to work correctly.
deneb.star
Big advantage : Some people tell me that there are some viruses under Linux, I still have to see one !!.
I will make some tries with ClamAV but it is mainly to protect the widows computer of my installation.
dachabre
Witch Linux distribution have lowest hardware demands (with graphic enviroment)????

Damn Small Linux - or something else??????
ocalhoun
Well, it would depend more on what you run on it that what distro it is. Personally, I would go for SuSE using the windowmaker WM.

There are, of course, older and lighter WM's, but they lack many things.
blueray
May be you can take a look the live cd that some dist. available. It does't required you do anything.
Just booting it up and taste it a while to see that dist. with gui will suite you needs.

This is some of which:
http://www.gentoo.org/main/en/where.xml
http://www.knoppix.org/

Hope this help.
Traveller
The topic "The least demanding Linux???????" really is no different from "Sticky: I want to get Linux, Which one is best?" - only addressing a specific issue, so the topics have been merged.
PatTheGreat42
I'm looking for a recommedation for a good Linux distro for an older machine. Specifically, the following:

IBM Thinkpad i Series Laptop
500 mHz
128 megs RAM
6 GB hard drive

Ideally, I need a relatively modern-looking distro, REALLY easy to use, nice array of drivers to using USB flash drives, and obviousely resource light. Probably a long shot, I know, but any suggestions would be welcome.

Thanks!
ashik
i think u should try Mepis.... i think it doesn't require that much hardware.....
PatTheGreat42
Whoah. How did that post wind up here?

Sorry to the original guy if I stole your thread.
ashik
i tried freespire.. it looks gud and it played almost all media files i threw at it.. It really fast in my Turion........
roguehider
Surely all linux distros are same in kernel. Where they differ is mostly the package management systems. (oops some older one even do not support package management.)

As you all know we have those famous rpm's. rpm is a standard set by red-hat (a.k.a little micro$oft :p) which stands for redhat package management as far as I know.

On the other side there is also an apt sistem. Set by debian, which uses .deb files.

Imho apt which stands for a packaging tool, is the best. I've been using debian for 5 years nearly and it is always the same, (robust and stable). All you need to do for installing a package is only this;
1- open up the console
2- su into root (>su -)
3- get it (>apt-get install package_name)

and also you can use "apt-cache search some_string" command to search within package lists in cache. to update cache you just need to tell apt-get to update himself. "apt-get update"

That's all, linux made easy and universally for more then 10 years, which is debian.
Daniel15
Quote:
which stands for redhat package management as far as I know.

It used to, but it now stands for RPM Package Manager Wink
roguehider
Daniel15 wrote:
Quote:
which stands for redhat package management as far as I know.

It used to, but it now stands for RPM Package Manager Wink



Recursivea acroynms Smile

RPM = redhat package management (base condition)
RPM = RPM Package Manager (recursive part)

so new meaning is Smile

RPM = "Redhat Package Managament" Package Manager Smile
vinx_18
I should say UBUNTU is the best among the rest. UBUNTU simply means humanity to others. UBUNTU comes with kubuntu, edubuntu and others. They have new releases every now and then. I'm using it for 2 years now and I'm loving it.
ashik
YUP... true... UBUNTU.. is the best among the starter OS right now...

i am having toruble with my soundcard of my LAPTOP (COMPAQ PRESARIO V3133).. i am running freespire.. the latest stable release.. It doesnt even recognize my sound card..
LostOverThere
vinx_18 wrote:
I should say UBUNTU is the best among the rest. UBUNTU simply means humanity to others. UBUNTU comes with kubuntu, edubuntu and others. They have new releases every now and then. I'm using it for 2 years now and I'm loving it.


Nah, Mandriva 2007, it comes with the choice of using GNOME or KDE. Has a 3d Desktop, and play Windows games, including, Half Life 2, World Of Warcraft etc.
blackorifice
fedora owns
osbits
I suggest you trying Unbuntu. I am working on it . It runs pretty well. Meanwhile, you can get a support of software collection, which means that you do not need to find softwares here and there but just type a command in the shell. It is really very good.
ashik
DOES mandriva 2007 come with CEDEGA ?...
yjwong
If you are new to Linux, you should give Ubuntu a try. Ubuntu is one of the most user friendliest OSes out there. It's community is quite big too. The Ubuntu Forums is a nice place to get support. The people there are friendly and willing to help. The installation process is easy, and also has a built in partition manager to repartition your hard disk. I'm currently using Ubuntu 6.10 (Edgy Eft). The wireless card (Intel PRO/Wireless 3945ABG) works like a charm, and my ATI Mobility Radeon X1400 works well too, with direct rendering enabled and Xgl too.
Alias
How about Debian GNU/Linux? Isn't this Linux OS that great because Ubuntu Linux and some other Linux OS distros are based on Debian?
netmajor
Can someone tell my how to install a UBUNTU Smile ??
I download this linux from official web.It is a cd picture,and i mount it with Daemon,but i don't find button to install Crying or Very sad
What i do bad?Or i download bad install cd??

Or can u tell my some other good linux,suse,aurox,mandrake?
Which is for intermediate users of pc?Is improtants in using linux is skills in linux or pc??
Daniel15
Alias wrote:
How about Debian GNU/Linux? Isn't this Linux OS that great because Ubuntu Linux and some other Linux OS distros are based on Debian?

Yes, Ubuntu, Xandros, Lindows and MEPIS (among others) are all based off Debian. See http://httwww.kde-look.org/content/files/44218-linuxdistrotimeline-6.9.png for a detailed timeline.

Quote:
DOES mandriva 2007 come with CEDEGA ?...

Cedega costs money (a monthly subscription fee), so I don't think it would come with it.
Handyman
Quote:

Can someone tell my how to install a UBUNTU ??
I download this linux from official web.It is a cd picture,and i mount it with Daemon,but i don't find button to install
What i do bad?Or i download bad install cd??


Did you burn the file as an image on a CD. It is a bootable file from a CD.
01000101
Knoppix deffinately. or blueflops lol...

i like the debian packaging system for knoppix as a main reason.

=]
Alias
Daniel15 wrote:
Alias wrote:
How about Debian GNU/Linux? Isn't this Linux OS that great because Ubuntu Linux and some other Linux OS distros are based on Debian?

Yes, Ubuntu, Xandros, Lindows and MEPIS (among others) are all based off Debian. See http://httwww.kde-look.org/content/files/44218-linuxdistrotimeline-6.9.png for a detailed timeline.


So why we don't go for the original since all of those latest Linux OS distros are all based from Debian packages? Smile
techquest
I use Mandriva 2007.

Its nice.
mike_phi
I dont think RHEL is free

Quote:
actually all of the linux distros are free. if you pay for it, you usually get a commercial edition complete with free upgrades, technical support, installation help etc. ..


does this imply we can doanload RHEL free of charge just we dont getthe support

cheers

Mic
brweb
I was using Ubuntu. But now I am using Fedora 6
Fedora is a great OS than Ubuntu as I see...
Daniel15
mike_phi wrote:
I dont think RHEL is free

Yeah, RHEL is not free. It's commerially supported, and the releases are supported with security updates for a long time (5 years, I think).

If you want something similar, CentOS uses components of RHEL.
matothito
photon wrote:
actually all of the linux distros are free. if you pay for it, you usually get a commercial edition complete with free upgrades, technical support, installation help etc. ..


... So does that mean that linux xp is a commercial distribution with fancy bells and whistles or is someone just capitalizing on good free code and give a bad name to linux? And, DSL users, why does it keep asking me to fdisk again whenever I try to boot? Is this a side effect of bad shutdowns? Or am I just horrible at using linux?
SFMeatwad
i personally like windows but linux is pretty good.. really good for hosting servers, though.
Grom
I use Gentoo dor now but I like Ubuntu too. My favourite distros is Slackware, Gentoo and Ubuntu.
tuncay
Ubuntu Edgy Eft is quite cool these days. If someone is looking for a high-level, real end-user kind of system, I really recommend Pardus 2007, does a great job in being a stable, fast and user-friendly system, I cannot say the same things about its being good for developers and such, but I think it's still a great effort. Check it out at:

http://www.pardus.org.tr/
darkhack
i think its a big headach
darkhack
but i think that linux is the main reason so many kids get in trouble today with cracking pcs like they are u33l
Arno v. Lumig
darkhack wrote:
but i think that linux is the main reason so many kids get in trouble today with cracking pcs like they are u33l


Umm? Do you think Linux is equipped to crack? I'm sure most scriptkiddies just use things like Sub7 to crack PCs, and as far as I know there is no linux version for that.

No, really, linux is more likely to make kids program and script and all then to make them crack other PCs.


Greetz,
Arno
ozank
I recommend you Pardus,
it is very nice, easy to use and hardware detection works well

also, since there is no patent issues in Turkey, you get propriety codecs
by default , also some other propriety libraries and programs
So you won't have that much headache after installation..

Other than that I would recommend Suse 10.2 and Ubuntu Edgy Eft
Both are cutting edge.
I really like, the latest start menu in Suse 10.2 , you have to see it.
mehtab
I would say Ubuntu is best. Its free and gives installation cd to all around the world which makes it the best linux distro. It have good compatiblity with new hardware like cameras and printers etc. It have one package of compiling set of tools which are required to install the softwares that require compiling. It have its own repository from which software can be downloaded and installed and also dependencies also get downloaded which helps developers to install software easily. If you are a gamer I would not recommed you linux because commercial games and can't be installed. Its only good for work and have most of software that are required for work which range from OpenOffice for word, database and spreadsheet to Server softwares for creating Websites and hosting purposes.
pluto
As a newer Linux user myself, I recommend Ubuntu. I have been using Ubuntu for 6 months now, and I really like it. You can get a copy and learn more about Ubunut at http://www.ubuntu.com

As for open source, open source is free software as in free speech, not free beer. However, you can find many open source software that is free, as in free beer. What I find neat about open source is the community involvment from helping newbies to developing the next release.

Good luck!

hack_man_ wrote:
I currently have Windows XP (god help me) and want to change to Linux. I know that Linux is open-source, but does that mean that it is free? I have no idea on the matter so I decided to consult the forums.

EDIT: New question. See topic title

Stickied by Animal - 31 May 06
dayveday
I'm currently using Debian on my desktop (after many successive complete windows crashes drove me mad). It was easy to install, and worked flawlessly with all my hardware. Also, debian is easy to use, to learn, and its default settings are pretty spot-on.

My brother-in-law prefers Ubuntu, which is supposed to be also very easy to download, and has fantastic software management built in. As far as I understand it, Ubuntu and Debian are next door neighbours in the world of linux.

One disadvantage of Debian is the size of the distribution. But, in that distribution most of the software you'll need is included. Also, the distribution system is fantastic in that it lets you upgrade from one distribution to the next with the minimum amount of downloading possible (it only downloads files that have changed between versions).
ashik
thats true... Debian is one of a kind... i tried to install it once by myself.. some years ago.. but failed.. but i have used it in my frds machine... it is really fast.. and works gr8...

i wud love to switch to it one day...
medhunter
Debian is way too powerful system

I had a problem insalling it but their mervillous IRC channel members helped me through it ,tho I was kinda too lazy to look well into documentation.

I recommend Debian to Experts ,not newbies.

I found an arabic Distro as well,named Arabian Linux
Quote:

About Arabian
Arabian Linux is a bootable CD containing the Linux operating system. The goal of the project is to build a simple desktop-oriented distribution that can run from a CDROM or hard drive. Arabian Linux is based on Debian GNU/Linux and Ubuntu.


Here is a launch page to find about it
http://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=arabian


Have a happy linux experience
soren121
Here's the Linux Distribution Chooser I found on the net: http://www.zegeniestudios.net/ldc/index.php?select_lang=true

It's a good quiz that picks the best distro. I personally recommend Ubuntu, having worked with Fedora Core, SUSE, and Ubuntu, Ubuntu is hands-down the best distro I've used (well, on my hardware). Try it out! Smile
eznet
Another great place for linux and all things free is OSDir. They have a lot of free software and have some good info about the *nix distros...
sm6eat
pluto wrote:
As a newer Linux user myself, I recommend Ubuntu. I have been using Ubuntu for 6 months now, and I really like it. You can get a copy and learn more about Ubunut at http://www.ubuntu.com

As for open source, open source is free software as in free speech, not free beer. However, you can find many open source software that is free, as in free beer. What I find neat about open source is the community involvment from helping newbies to developing the next release.

Good luck!



Completely agree! Used it about as long as you, was using mandrake before that. The ability to test it from the CD before you decide to install is great!

// Roland
ashik
hey... has anyone tried. using OPENSUSE 10.2

if u have... plz tell me how it is.. i am planinng to upgrade from my kubuntu...
mr.emre
:: Pardus :: TÜBÝTAK/UEKAE ::
shaun6
SUSE linux is the best hands down.
jay84h
I am new to Linux as well. I was recommended Ubuntu, which I indeed downloaded, and tried out. It seems pretty good, I like it. Which is why I am currently partitioning one of my computer for the Linux Ubuntu OS.
cavaliere
I would recommend th Dreamlinux which is made by brazilian guys on is based on Debian, I have on my notebook and its working fine.
The good thing is that you actually download LiveCd and can load from it, but also you can install from that disk too
ashik
hey.. i gonna try installin it on a dated system..

AMD ATHLON THUNDERBIRD 1.2 GHZ, 384 MB RAM, 64 MB GeFORCE MX440

can u give me a performance review.. ie.. how good it runs in ur mahcine.. and how good its multimedia capabilites are...

Does is run, WM file out of box..??
Daniel15
ashik wrote:
hey.. i gonna try installin it on a dated system..

AMD ATHLON THUNDERBIRD 1.2 GHZ, 384 MB RAM, 64 MB GeFORCE MX440

can u give me a performance review.. ie.. how good it runs in ur mahcine.. and how good its multimedia capabilites are...

Does is run, WM file out of box..??

Ubuntu will run fine on that, no problems at all Smile
Using Automatix (a program for Ubuntu Linux), you can easily install codecs needed for most things (MP3, MPEG4, etc.), and media players to play them (including my favourite, VLC) Smile
desertwind
Debian is the way to go.

I'm currently running Debian Etch Beta2, with all latest updates. Waiting for the final release.
hardcoregamer808
If you have a pretty pimped out system, go for Ubuntu, then get Compix/XGL, then it looks very pretty and it's a pretty solid OS. I'm also pretty sure theres alot of support and help out on the internet for it.
ashik
yup.. i was thinking abt debian tooo.. may be once the final release comes out i wud install tat... right now im runnin Kubuntu .... its working fine.. but the installation is gettin real old... so gonna wait till DEBIAN final release comes out......

thanks to all u guys.. for ur time... Smile
turbowolf
I think Ubuntu is the best one. It's oriented from Debian so that it get most of the characteristic of Debian. On the other hand, its GUI tools are perfect so a dumbie can move to it from windoz easily.
frac2
I have a dual boot Windows XP Home / Ubuntu. I use Ubuntu alot, although I'm on XP right now.
ayvee
debian's really good. if you have a fast internet connection you can update your installed packages daily. you'll always have the latest version that way. oh, and the installation isn't difficult at all, nothing to be afraid of. you can always ask on irc or on the forums if you're stuck somewhere.

ubuntu's based on debian and it's supposed to be quite good, especially if you're just starting out.
ankur.vatsa
I am addicted to suse linux. I have used Red Hat and FC but suse linux makes sure that I keep sticking to it. You have to see it to believe it. Very Happy
tomjooonas
I think that ubuntu is easiest way to start. Ubuntu is most popular linux distro. That is reason why you can also find help with your possible problems with Ubuntu. You can find or write for help to community forum or many other different ubuntu forums.

There is also available easy way to get multimedia systems to work. Softwares for that is automatix2 or easyubuntu. I used automatix2. I tried first easyubuntu but didn´t get all components work.

I have Ubuntu in my old laptop and I am very happy with that.
dedicatedtolkien
My personal opinion is that the best version of Linux to use, especially for a begining user, would be Ubuntu, with a KDE user interface. Its fairly self explanatory, has great manuals bundled with it, and has a user interface that is fully custumisable. This means that any user can create their own personal user interface for their system that has all of the features that they're used to and comfortable with. It also has all of the controls set up in such a way that it is fairly easy and self explanatory for begining users to get a hang of, but still has all of the tools available for advanced users to get done what they need to do. Plus, the Debian style repository system with package manager and apt-get make getting upgrades and new packages as simple as marking them for instalation.

All in all, I'd say its the best system out there.
chearan2
Still have windows xp, and i want to discover linux. Now with frihost, i have 9 Pages on this topic. I will read carefully suggestions, experience of everyone, and maybe i will go into the "dark side" Wink
linexpert
i use ubuntu and love it. if you're not much of a gnome fan check out kbuntu.
the reason ubuntu sticks out compared to all the other distros that i've tried is the fact that their support community is huge. Plus it's distributing and growing rapidly.
Daniel15
While we're speaking about Linux, does anyone know what's happening with Debian Etch (4.0)? The original release was scheduled for December 2006, and nobody has really said why it's running this late Sad
Citizen Kane
Anybody tried Linux Mint? It's Ubuntu but with all the media codecs installed. Even uses the Ubuntu update servers...

I ran it for a while, found it great. But had to go back to XP. Canon printers are rarely supported in Linux... Crying or Very sad
jon9314
goto http://ubuntusoftware.info/ and download Ubuntu Ultimate 1.2
realkiller
So is linux better than window? coz to tell the truth windows is starting to bore me i want a change someone needs to make more op systems lol
reactive
realkiller wrote:
So is linux better than window? coz to tell the truth windows is starting to bore me i want a change someone needs to make more op systems lol


Well if you're not into games that much, you should definetly switch to a Linux distro, I'd personally recommend Ubuntu since it's probably the most popular right now, but of course there are others depending on your needs. I mean, you get free/open source programs always improving by day and night, a big community willing to help you anytime, even free cds for some distros, there's plenty of benefits Smile.
Arno v. Lumig
realkiller wrote:
So is linux better than window? coz to tell the truth windows is starting to bore me i want a change someone needs to make more op systems lol



Ohh.. Here we go.

Linux is not better then Windows, and Windows is not better the Linux. They're just different. Personally I prefer FreeBSD, but I've also used a few linux distros for a while.

Windows is definately better for people who just want it to work, and who want to be able to call customer support and get clear and simple answers like "Press "Start", go to configuration blahblah". Some people don't want to know if they're using Gnome or KDE. Some just want it to work and be default. These people are best off using Windows (Probably XP..).

Some other people are more interested in computers, and they want to know a bi t more about it, and want to tune it in on their preferences. Those people are best off using Linux/BSD.

Personally I prefer FreeBSD, for it's stability, speed and security. The reason I'll never recommend it to people who have no clue about computers is just because not everyone is capable of installing and configuring everything by themselves. Those people are better off with SuSE, PCLinuxOS, Dream Linux, Ubuntu, Linspire or perhaps Windows.

One OS is not better then the other. It's just different and has it's own good and bad things. I can't recommend any OS to you, because I don't know how good you're with computers, what your hardware is, and what you want to do with it.

Greetz,
Arno
mony
i think that Mandrake is one of the best OS u ever see
photon
One word : Ubuntu
Zzz.
Goodbye Micro$oft ! Wink
eznet
If you ain't checked it out, you need to... Sabayon Linux with integrated Beryl is Baaaaddd. Sabayon is visually stunning and loaded out. It is available on a liveCD as well as having a full functioning installer for disc installer.

Here are some of my screen shots from my Flickr account...


Arno v. Lumig
Sabayon = too bloaty for me.
turbosquid
I guess choosing a linux distro is partly down to user preference but if you are a newbie i can highly recommend Ubuntu it's been well designed and is simple to use and to setup/install also there i a huge community of ubuntu users out there meaning you are not far away from help if you should need it.

Check out the Ubuntu website :-

http://www.ubuntu.com/

TurboSquid
littletomi714
I recommend UBUNTU 6.10 or something like that. It has mostly all WIndows capabilities and introduces you to a little programming
eznet
Arno v. Lumig wrote:
Sabayon = too bloaty for me.


Bloaty? If by this you mean that it has tons of preconfigured and preloaded software, then I would have to agree - but for alot of people slackware or other 'bare' distros aren't going to do it cause many people do not even know how to configure X let alone install anything else.

Personally I do not use Sabayon for my main system; it is my 'Hey, look at this' distro. For stability and speed I use a standard x64 install of Gentoo (gawd I love portage) though I must admit that OpenSUSE is nice... I have no loyalty; I am a linux who-are. Whoever flashes the prettiest shiny gets my attention Smile

Interesting and pertinent tid-bit: Sabayon 3.3 just hit the mirrors!
xsharez
Ubuntu very friendly...get it now.
eznet
I agree! I have been playing with Ubuntu Feisty Fawn (developmental stage) and love it. They have made it very friendly and easy to use. I am amazed at how easy it was to get up and running - out of the box, everything worked on my computer and it was but a quick hop to the repositories to have Beryl going smoothly in native nVidia. Sweet. Makes my Vista look like a chump OS Very Happy

I have a feeling that if Ubuntu keeps up its pace it will not be too long before they are getting attacked by MS out of fear. It is going to take very little to make Feisty Fawn better than MS OSes and with many in the dev community getting behind it, the applications will be there (heck, for the most part, they already are!).

I'm feelin' it!
socialoutcast
currently, and I mean at this very moment as a type this post, I am using Suse Linux. and often i'll swich to fedora 6 and maybe to kubutu. or two at the same time.

How to I do this? VMware baby! I have XP installed as my host machine, and from XP I can boot what ever flavor of linux I feel like or as much as my memory will allow. I even have a window98 vmware image set up.

I really use XP to run my games. i'd switch to linux right now if someone could tell me how I could run my windows based games on linux. Especally knights of the old republic.
Shake
I run Linux and Windows on separate partitions on one machine, and I can safely say that I really have no reason to use Linux most of the time. I have so much data on my Windows partition that I really don't feel like transferring it or doing anything with it for that matter. I will occasionally hop onto Linux, but I'm not incredibly interested in it. That being said, I just think I should give this bit of advice: If you use Windows and have for a long time, and are happy with it, but want to switch out of curiosity, don't sweat it. Sure, go ahead and install Ubuntu or SUSE or Redhat, or whatever. Just remember, you may not find it to be all that great. You may find that you wish you still had ready access to all your Windows applications and games. There are some ways around this, that involve manipulating the software to get it to run under Linux, or manipulating Linux to get it to run Windows apps, but many of these solutions are complicated and take time. So, if you are a Unix newbie, you may want to go install that interesting new release, just to give it a test-run, but it isn't the end of your computing days if you encounter problems along the way.
dedicatedtolkien
The software source is always going to be free, but if you have someone put it on a cd and ship it to you or something, it will probably come with some sort of charge for that.
eznet
socialoutcast wrote:
currently, and I mean at this very moment as a type this post, I am using Suse Linux. and often i'll swich to fedora 6 and maybe to kubutu. or two at the same time.


That doesn't count Twisted Evil You want it to count, run windows under linux virtualization (like I do Surprised ).

Kidding of course. This way is a good way to wet your feet but to really get the feel for linux, you should be running it without a virtual install.

Now, as far as running your windows games, virtualization (qemu) under linux or wine are decent routes.... I have seen quake, WOW, and halo played under linux using QEmu so support seems to be wide if you are dedicated to the cause.
Blaster
photon wrote:
One word : Ubuntu

I agree. In like 2 weeks the stable version of feisty fawn will be coming out. So go for that.
xbcd
i jumped ship about a month before vista shipped. I was accustomed to windows and quite experenced with it. But what it came down to was easiest migration. SuSE 10.2 was my answer. I figured all i have to do is install and everything would work. Guess what it did except one thing. My printer a $10 lexmark printer. Lexmark has horrible linux support and i learned that. What to do, buy a 50 HP branded printer. HP supports opensource and it worked with no config. $50 for no virus, speed, security, and a learning experience. I'll take that anyday. Windows $200 virus, semi-speed, illusion of security, and frustration when it just doesn't work. I think not.
tommypanda
ubuntu is the best version of linux you can have when your starting out, I have about 5 boot disk version and this was the easiest to use, it only has 2 workstations but hey it more the windows and it has 5 games, a word processor, powerpoint type programme and excel type one, along with gimp the linux version of photoshop and preinstalled firefox and all for free. try it. if your into more serios stuff try linux backtrack but that manly made for you hackers out there Twisted Evil lol
Rosanova
Hi there,

This is my first add made from my new Linux distribution, Freespire. This is a story that might could be a use for others that today using Microsoft Windows.

Until a couple of days ago, did have my fighting with getting of with an evil virus, that actually had killed my hard disk, at least I thought that it had killed my hard disk. I was trying to getting it cleaned with all of my knowledge about Windows from fdisk using dos to trying windows 2000, and I had actually giving up as far that I was searching for a new hard disk.

Then did I tried to, in desperation and refuse to accept that a single virus could have such power to kill a hard disk, get along with just some linux distribution to find out if it really could be true.

Then did I therefor googled all the entire web to find out if there should be a such distribution that could save me for further trouble, and did get into Linspire's homesite and find this free distribution of it called Freespire, and did downloaded, burned and then settled it into my PC.

First did I tried to run the demo from the CD-Rom to see if it could work together with my hardware, no problem. Then did I, also from my CD-Rom, run the partition tools that was included the distribution, what surprisingly found my hard disk partitioned and formatted to ext2 (The linux fs).

Then did I restarted and get on with the finally installation of Freespire, and after 20 minutes everything was ready for run, and now are I'm sitting here satisfied to know that my hard disk is still alive, and never been much more alive.

So regarding to the main question, would my answer be that Freespire or Linspire has to be the most easy way intro into the world of Linux, and I hope that this story can inspire other Microsoft users who is tired using windows, who would wish to use something else like Linux.


Cheers! Laughing
eznet
Rosanova wrote:

So regarding to the main question, would my answer be that Freespire or Linspire has to be the most easy way intro into the world of Linux, and I hope that this story can inspire other Microsoft users who is tired using windows, who would wish to use something else like Linux. Laughing


I think that this is very true - Windows users will find freespire to be an easy transition. It has a tarnished name because the use to try to sell it and most in the community feel that Linux should be free but now they are free so I think that it is no longer that big of and issue.

Something that is very positive from the stance of Ubuntu is that you do not have to stay in a Windows-like environment, which is what freespire feels like to me. With Ubuntu you can move to GNome which is easier than using the windows interface for me. Thank goodness that Linux is becoming more and more of a viable option for even entry level computer users.
liuxu
Actually,if you used windows for a long time, you will find it is very hard to switch to Linux. There are not so many softwares in Linux, and installing software is much harder. I think you can use Linux only when you are a programmer or you want a server, not a workstation!
mutouren
I use redhat linux operater system
and it really works very well
while there're less support softwares for linux than windows
so I have to use both of them
hilander
I think I will try that sabayon distro,,,Right now I am trying to install ubuntu,,with no luck it does not recognize my network card..And I need it mainly to surf. I will try kubuntu next,,and at last that sabayon linux,,it looks great...cheers
LostOverThere
hilander wrote:
I think I will try that sabayon distro,,,Right now I am trying to install ubuntu,,with no luck it does not recognize my network card..And I need it mainly to surf. I will try kubuntu next,,and at last that sabayon linux,,it looks great...cheers


Im a Mandriva man myself, go get the free version now I say!

Though, Slackware, SLAX (Live CD version of Slackware) are also good.

Avoid Damn Small Linux and Fedora at all costs. Rolling Eyes
icedrakon
I have try to install many distributions rethat, mandrake(mandriva) fedora
debian, suse, i trust only debian the latest release
ammonkc
It depends on what you want to use it for. Lately I've been running a couple of VMware servers on CentOS and I really like it. But for desktop use I would go with something like Ubuntu or SUSE. Both of those come packaged with everything you need right out of the box. Both Ubuntu and SUSE have really good drivers support.
imagefree
I also want to shift to linux but i have heared that linux has some problems with networking and Internet. is it rite or can i use internet on linux smoothly just i do on XP?


Please help
reddishblue
imagefree wrote:
I also want to shift to linux but i have heared that linux has some problems with networking and Internet. is it rite or can i use internet on linux smoothly just i do on XP?


Please help

No, Linux distros are generally fine with internet, I can't imagine where you heard they aren't.
hilander
Well I did, have to say that I had to format my whole harddisck after trying to install ubuntu feisty. Even when my hard disk could not boot, I cheered me up, thinking that then I could install ubuntu,,but could not. I am back here in windows, against my will. Some how It did not recognize my wireless internet usb card...I guess I just had bad luck with all that people, enjoying ubuntu or other linux releases...
ammonkc
imagefree wrote:
I also want to shift to linux but i have heared that linux has some problems with networking and Internet. is it rite or can i use internet on linux smoothly just i do on XP?


Please help


I have to say that this could not be further from the truth. Linux has some of the biggest players in the networking sphere. one example is Novell. Also the world wide server market is dominated by linux. I would argue that its companies like microsoft that kinda mess things up for everybody by trying to release their own proprietary protocals for stuff.
Arno v. Lumig
imagefree wrote:
I also want to shift to linux but i have heared that linux has some problems with networking and Internet. is it rite or can i use internet on linux smoothly just i do on XP?


Please help


Networking is smooth, unless you want to use a wireless card. Wireless support sucks for Linux.
bulek
You should try Ubuntu which is the most popular at the moment. I'm pretty sure that you won't be disappointed with it. I have installed it on my server and I have to annotations over it. I can only confirm that it's much better than my old Fedore core.
Daniel15
Arno v. Lumig wrote:
imagefree wrote:
I also want to shift to linux but i have heared that linux has some problems with networking and Internet. is it rite or can i use internet on linux smoothly just i do on XP?


Please help


Networking is smooth, unless you want to use a wireless card. Wireless support sucks for Linux.

Wireless works perfectly for me using a Intel Pro Wireless 3945 (IPW3945), even with WPA Smile.
LostOverThere
After playing around for Live CDs for nearly 2 Months, I finally installed Mandriva 2007. Hoorah! Smile
mehulved
Arno v. Lumig wrote:
Networking is smooth, unless you want to use a wireless card. Wireless support sucks for Linux.
Depends very much on what wireless card you have. If it's well supported then there won't be any problem. It'd be as easy as it is in windows.
And also, these days many distros like sabayon, ubuntu ultimate edition, mandriva, etc come with proprietory drivers which require minimum configuration, if any to get you working.
LostOverThere
...And after a few days I uninstalled Mandriva and installed Kubuntu. I have found my new home. Kubuntu FTW. Smile

http://cheesegames.net/linux/
crazypal24x7
well guy
s why dont u all try ubuntu which is avaible freely from ubuntu.com & u can even order Cds 4 free
LostOverThere
...Or just download it.

Not everybody loves Ubuntu. Personally I hate GNOME. Thus is why im using Kubuntu. SUSE is a great choice too. Smile
vln004
ubuntu is by far the most up to date and the most user friendly distro you'll ever use. theres 1000+ software progs in their repos and the .deb package manager makes installin anything as simple as point and click.


i've used fedora7, mandriva 2007.1, opensuse 10.2 and ubuntu 4.10-7.04 and always ran back to ubuntu.
LostOverThere
vln004 wrote:
ubuntu is by far the most up to date and the most user friendly distro you'll ever use. theres 1000+ software progs in their repos and the .deb package manager makes installin anything as simple as point and click.


i've used fedora7, mandriva 2007.1, opensuse 10.2 and ubuntu 4.10-7.04 and always ran back to ubuntu.


That's not true. Ubuntu is based on Debian, those are all debian packages. And Ubuntu is updated everything a new Debian comes out.
vln004
LostOverThere wrote:
vln004 wrote:
ubuntu is by far the most up to date and the most user friendly distro you'll ever use. theres 1000+ software progs in their repos and the .deb package manager makes installin anything as simple as point and click.


i've used fedora7, mandriva 2007.1, opensuse 10.2 and ubuntu 4.10-7.04 and always ran back to ubuntu.


That's not true. Ubuntu is based on Debian, those are all debian packages. And Ubuntu is updated everything a new Debian comes out.




the ubuntu repos are different from the debian repos. (repo = repository; the place the software is hosted) The debian repo has much less software then the ubuntu repo. ;p

btw. i don't understand what you're calling untrue. the most up to date or the most user friendly? if you don't believe ubuntu is the most up to date go check www.distrowatch.com and compare packages.

on a side note. the next version of ubuntu 7.10 will have compiz fusion built in!!
turbosquid
If your are new to Linux i would recommend Ubuntu it is very straight forward and works well on most systems without the need to spend hours configuring stuff.
At first you will probably find Linux a little odd but thats the same when using any new OS. The main benefits of Linux are:-

1> It works Wink
2> It's robust and reliable
3> It's FREE!!!!
4> Most Linux software is FREE!!
5> it's Frequently updated
6> It's much more secure than windows (if setup properly)
7> Your less susceptible to virus attacks and spyware.

Give it chance spend a little time with it, its obviously different to windows, but i think you'll be pleasantly surprised.

TurboSquid
legolovin
turbosquid wrote:
If your are new to Linux i would recommend Ubuntu it is very straight forward and works well on most systems without the need to spend hours configuring stuff.
At first you will probably find Linux a little odd but thats the same when using any new OS. The main benefits of Linux are:-

1> It works Wink
2> It's robust and reliable
3> It's FREE!!!!
4> Most Linux software is FREE!!
5> it's Frequently updated
6> It's much more secure than windows (if setup properly)
7> Your less susceptible to virus attacks and spyware.

Give it chance spend a little time with it, its obviously different to windows, but i think you'll be pleasantly surprised.

TurboSquid


I definitely agree with all of that. I have a virtual machine running Ubuntu, and I use it more than my main OS (windows XP)
bri4n5
I use CentOS (redhat's clon) and i must it's a great OS. I'm a big fan of Red Hat. Smile
Arno v. Lumig
I recently installed Ubuntu on both PCs (before I was the only one using Linux, now the rest of the family uses it too), but I'm not 100% pleased with it. Everything works etc, but I find it kinda unstable (yesterday Nautilus just stopped working for no reason, and I had to reboot...) It's a lot more stable then Windows, but coming from FreeBSD it's not quite stable enough. I also noticed that the CPU usage never got above 50%. I got two cores, and they're NEVER both 100% in use, no matter what I do, like converting video or running graphics-intensive programs)

Do you think it would be wise to install FreeBSD with all programs we use now, and gnome (so the conversion is not too hard for the rest of the family), and use that for everything instead? I am sure my hardware is fully supported. I also don't use much more then default gnome tools (totem, eog, nautilus), openoffice, firefox and evolution.
One of my computers is 64-bit. Is it possible to run the linux flash player through nspluginwrapper? (There is no native 64-bit flash plugin, and we need YouTube (stable and all, not crashy like it is now))
Arnie
If you want stability, try Debian. Ubantu (sic) is based on it but is not better. It's hyped, it has a community full of whiners, it has a shitty name and colour (literally), and it hardly credits Debian. They don't even make their packages Debian compatible; so they take their whole basis from it, but don't give much back... which is their right under the GPL, but still lame.

Most of Ubantu's packages are taken from Debian's unstable branch, the most bleeding-edge version of Debian. For Debian, the packages then go through the testing branch and only after that are put into stable, which currently is 4.0 Etch. Ubantu however just gets them from unstable and puts them right into their next release. Sometimes they even take packages out of the experimental repository, which Debian considers so experimental that it's not a complete distribution but just a repository!

With Debian Etch 4.0 you will not have the bleeding edge versions of software (which you don't need anyway) but it's thoroughly tested. Which is why most Debian users are not so fond of Ubantu...

About Flash: if you install a 32-bit OS (be it Linux, FreeBSD, or Windows) I think you can just use the 32-bit Flash player, even though your CPU supports 64-bits. If you insist on using a 64-bits OS, then you'll have to deal with the consequences of bad support I'm afraid.
Arno v. Lumig
Thanks for your reply, Arnie. I will consider using Debian, although I'm not sure yet (I only used it for a few days, before my PC went boom and I had to buy an new one & reinstall.)
I actually like the ubuntu color sceme, but I'm sure it won't be a problem to find it somewhere on gnome-look.org.
I gotta admit, I don't think Ubuntu is that bad. It's just too generic to be fast, and the forum feels just like a helpdesk ("Did you install the packages?"). I also don't really get the advantage of ubuntu over Debian, except for some gui configuration tools I never use anyway.

I still think I would prefer FreeBSD, I'm just not sure if I can get it configured to resemble the positive sides of Ubuntu, which is what my family is used to now. My experience with FreeBSD is is that it is ~50% faster then Ubuntu, but I never tried that on Debian.
Arnie
You could consider getting a cheap extra pc, so that your family can use Ubantu and you can use FreeBSD? Or making a dual boot... Wink Ubantu is a bit like Windows XP, once people are used to its fancy colours and stuff, they think anything else is bad quality and they won't stop whining even if everything is right.
eznet
There are just so many factors to consider when evaluating an OS - especially true when applied to an OS like Linux. Ubuntu is certainly an easy one to get into and it has a lot of 'out of the box' support for a lot of hardware on the market. With this said, Ubuntu users are 'pigeon holed' into a lot of defaults that aren't really 'defaults' in the real Linux world. Despite this 'shortcoming', there is no arguing that Ubuntu has done a whole lot for the Linux world and has greatly assisted in bringing Linux to the masses.

Quote:
*blah, blah, blah* Wireless for linux sucks *blah, blah, blah*


Ok, there is a severe over-generalization here. I will concede, there are some wireless cards that are a big-ol-beotch in linux, notably Broadcom cards, but there are also a great deal of cards that work like a dream without any problems - admittedly large in part to the previously mentioned 'pigeon hole-ing' done by Ubuntu (in this case the restricted drivers manager). Intel cards, as has been cited, work great with little need for additional configuration.... On a related note, even the cards that do require configuration and driver wrapping aren't, or haven't been for me, too hard to get up and running if you put in a little work (if you don't want to put in a little work then go use windows - thats what it is there for).

On the topic of specific distros; there are a lot of great ones available... Balls up men (and women) - play with em, see what you like and don't like - (if you smoke too much grass to remember) make a list of these likes and dislikes and see where you stand. I personally love Gentoo - unfortunately it seems to be dieing! There is A LOT of configuration needed for this distro, but I personally have never experienced a better running distro in all of my experiences.... next, I like Slackware... great distro with a lot of packages... again, configuration required, but YOU WILL LEARN A LOT ABOUT LINUX AND YOUR COMPUTER...

I will admit, I am using Ubuntu on my laptop right now... Have Gentoo on the desktop... I like Ubuntu and there is a lot to be said for out of the box configuration (especially when in your senior year of obtaining a CS degree (as I am)) as it is really easy to get installed, configured and coding in an hour... But if you have time to kill and want to learn about what you are using, get something that requires you to use that gray matter to troubleshoot... it can be fun (after the aggravation subsides)!

I am bouncing back and forth between Sabayon and Ubuntu... Both are great distos.... If efficiency and processor thriftiness isn't exactly what you are looking for then I have to suggest trying Sabayon - it is a Gentoo based distro (YEA!!!) and has A LOT of cutting edge sheot in there... it is really fun to use and really requires you, the lazy user, to do next to nothing to get running.... It is, as previously suggested, a consumptive distro in that it has a lot going on that requires mem/processor.... if you are using a slower/older machine then don't use it, but if your box has hardware collecting dust cause you haven't beaten it out in awhile, then hit it with Sabayon.... or ignore all of this... I am tired and do not even remember where I was going with this... peace.
Arnie
One guess where Ubantu gets its good hardware support from...
Arno v. Lumig
Arnie wrote:
One guess where Ubantu gets its good hardware support from...


AFAIK Ubuntu is the first with the "restricted driver manager", and I've heard that it has some wireless config tools too.
(although I've never had a problem with cd /usr/ports/x11/nvidia-drivers && make install clean)

I've figured out why my CPU usage never reaches 100%. All CPU-intensive parts of my daily stuff appear to be single-threaded... Evil or Very Mad Mad (Why... WHY would you make a movie converter thingy single threaded? WHY?!, and WHY would you make the startup of a program (which is apparantly not much more then loading libraries, reading and interpreting config files etc) single-threaded?!?!?!)
eznet
Arno v. Lumig wrote:
... I've heard that it has some wireless config tools too.


If I am not mistaken, the wireless tools of which you are likely referencing were actually developed by Redhat and merely integrated by Ubuntu. There was a bit to controversy in the Redhat world regarding this 'adoption'. Regardless, the wireless tools coupled with the 'Restricted Drivers Manager' does make the whole wireless deal a lot easier to manage.
sickpsique
I usually when i want to try with a new distro of Linux ge here:
http://www.frozentech.com/content/livecd.php

there u can find lots of distros perfect for your needs and goes from 50 MB OS to full Desktop enviroments like 1770 MB
u need to look out one for you !
exhaust
Hmmm

Look for Ubuntu LiveCd.
goole it
dowload and burn
try
it runs from your cd drive and does not install on your hdd.!!!!
matpestana
Ubuntu is "fashion"?Yes.
Ubuntu is "easy"?Yes.
Ubuntu helps the final-user?Yes.
But I think: using ubuntu you don't learn as if you are using Slackware,Debian,Fedora,etc.It's for final users,to desktops,yes...but if you wanna learn,use others...it's an adventure Smile
LostOverThere
May well be, but Ubuntu is designed to be easy. Not a teacher.
xbcd
Kubuntu if you are going from windows. Also get the kicker menu for kde and you can't go wrong.
LostOverThere
xbcd wrote:
Kubuntu if you are going from windows. Also get the kicker menu for kde and you can't go wrong.


If you want a good KDE distribution, try Linux Mint KDE.
eznet
LostOverThere wrote:
xbcd wrote:
Kubuntu if you are going from windows. Also get the kicker menu for kde and you can't go wrong.


If you want a good KDE distribution, try Linux Mint KDE.


Yea, I played with Mint and there were some really interesting features on there - package support for one. Neat to see a disto piggy backing on Ubuntu, seeing that Ubuntu is piggy-backing Debian (and RedHat).

Ahh... the communal nature of Linux and OpenSource; ain't it grand?!
eliniko
If you are a newbie, I would recommend Ubuntu.
It is sleek.
Plus it is fast n has all the software that you will require.
It is a derivative of debain so its basic package is .deb
I seem to notice that .deb package have small size as compared to rpm and .exe
cosmicx
Ubuntu a good choice for good beginners...
haha Very Happy
bostko
PCLinuxOS 2007. This is very good linux distribution. It's perfect for beginners.
BlueVD
Mandriva is top notch for people that are used to Win. Fedora is the second choice.
LostOverThere
I really wouldn't recommend Mandriva. Its very buggy and no easier then any other KDE specific distro.

If you want easy, go Ubuntu, if you want something easy for windows users, go something like Linux Mint KDE
Emmer-Compascuum
I've tried the following distributions now on my laptop: Ubuntu, Fedora, OpenSuSE and Mandriva.

Ubuntu worked pretty well for me, it was my first encounter with Linux and it's not really difficult to use. (Restricted) drivers are easy to setup, my wireless connection was setup very quickly as well. I did have a problem with my USB-mouse though, a problem which I did not have with the other distributions.

Someone suggested that I should try Fedora, which I did. Fedora looked similar to Ubuntu, but as a newbie it wasn't exactly a good choice. Opening a folder automatically opened a new window (you can't expect a newbie to configure that manually). I had lots of difficulties installing the drivers for my wireless card, so well... I guess it would be easy to use for more experienced users.

Then I tried OpenSuSE (KDE). I was quite surprised I could open my files on my Windows partition immediately without having to configure anything. Especially KDE looked very good and... Well, that was about it. It was a bit more user friendly than Fedora, but I still had difficulties setting up a working wireless connection.

Well... I didn't want to try any more Linux distributions, so I deleted all non-Linux partitions with Gparted. Apparently including the boot loader. Erhm. So, I tried one last distribution:

Mandriva One (I'm adding 'One' because the 'Free' version didn't work as well). I used the KDE version and it was very user friendly, I had a wireless connection within seconds and what impressed me most, was that - unlike the other distro's - Mandriva One's 3D effects worked immediately. I think it's not really the 'standard' distro, but I guess this is a good point to start my Linux quest and I'll try to learn more in time.
r2holdings
Mainly for newbies like me

Ubuntu
Mandriva / Mandrake / Redhat

For Firewall only

IP COP
Alias
I recommend ubuntu and fedora for beginners because it's easy to use and it's the most popular linux distro the support is good too.

If your a advanced linux user I recommend you to use slackware or debian.
eznet
I will have to reiterate what I have previously stated: Ubuntu is an excellently robust and strong OS that is excellent and that is easy for beginners to get into Linux with. I have recently installed PCLinuxOS 2007 for some people wishing to get some Linux experience and I must say that it may actually be a bit more suited to beginners than Ubuntu.

I must say though, Ubuntu, being based on Debian, is a very STRONG OS. It has not only great support but offers very advanced capabilities. By advanced I mean that you can either use it by skimming the surface without delving too deep or you can get into some of the more advanced features of its Debian base.

On the other hand, PCLinuxOS makes IT easy. On every computer that I have installed it, within minutes I had not only all hardware (broadcom and Intel wireless + nVidia and ATI video cards) working without any real configuration (which is not always the case with Ubuntu), but all the perks (such as Beryl AND Compiz) working flawlessly with just a couple of clicks after install. It really is a great OS (as is Ubuntu).

I would say: Try Ubuntu, if you love it - fantastic, so do I... If you have problems with Ubuntu, try PCLinuxOS, it will likely give you what you are missing as a beginner.
cybernytrix
I have used Linux from the 2.0 days when slackware ruled the roost. Then for some time it was redhat and then came along fedora core. I dumped FC5 for Ubunut Feisty Fawn like 6 months ago. Ubuntu is great and they don't have the same conflict of interest as RedHat or other commercial vendors. Hope it stays that way.
eznet
cybernytrix wrote:
. Ubuntu is great and they don't have the same conflict of interest as RedHat or
other commercial vendors. Hope it stays that way.


You, me and everyone in "the community"! Ubuntu is a great distro. I hate to be on the mainstream bandwagon, but Ubuntu has the power of arguably one of the strongest Linux flavors (Debian) and the backing of a sizable community, the likes of which have never really been seen before in the mainstream tech community. Ubuntu has excellent support and rapid adoption of new introductions in the GNU/Linux arena... Win - Win. Like you said, hope it keeps moving strong.
LostOverThere
eznet wrote:
I hate to be on the mainstream bandwagon, but Ubuntu...


You're not, Windows is. Smile
Arnie
Actually Ubuntu is very much mainstream... the way things go in that community and the attitude of many users show that.
Ankhanu
Ubuntu has been the easiest to use distro that I've tried, I highly recommend it. I had reservations about using it as a webserver, but a friend recently installed Ubuntu Server edition and absolutely loves it.

I've tried a few others, and also have Debian currently installed on a system, and it seems decent. Most of my previous Linux experience was on Mandrake/Mandriva and Red Hat... which aren't quite as nice, but are very well supported.
azuwis
Debian is my favorite Linux distribution. But for beginners, I recommend Ubuntu
daran
hack_man_ wrote:
I currently have Windows XP (god help me) and want to change to Linux. I know that Linux is open-source, but does that mean that it is free? I have no idea on the matter so I decided to consult the forums.

EDIT: New question. See topic title

Stickied by Animal - 31 May 06



best of linux version is Obonto. you can order this from www.obonto.com and reseive it free.
Arno v. Lumig
daran wrote:
hack_man_ wrote:
I currently have Windows XP (god help me) and want to change to Linux. I know that Linux is open-source, but does that mean that it is free? I have no idea on the matter so I decided to consult the forums.

EDIT: New question. See topic title

Stickied by Animal - 31 May 06



best of linux version is Obonto. you can order this from www.obonto.com and reseive it free.


Ubuntu, Unbuntu, Ubunut, and now Obonto? It keeps getting creepier.
eznet
azuwis wrote:
Debian is my favorite Linux distribution. But for beginners, I recommend Ubuntu

No doubt, Debian is, imho, hands down the cream of the crop... being so, Debian is what makes Ubuntu as great as it is as well. There is a lot to be said for the utter simplicity of Ubuntu that makes it a nice addition to the flavor-fest of Linux distros. I love Debian; it doesn't get much easier than Debian to get a safe and functional robust system up and running. Ubuntu just makes the configuration a bit easier.
I used to be an avid Gentoo user... I still love it, but I have just found it easier to get work done in Ubuntu than it was in Gentoo - where I always felt like I was working on getting some peculiarity worked out of my system. I also loved slackware, but it was much the same as Gentoo in that regard.

I think that if you really have no experience with Linux, likely the best thing to do in today's Linux world is to download half a dozen Live ISOs of the most popular distros, burn em to disk and give em a whirl. Used to, you couldnt just download a ISO and try it out... best you could hope for in that regard was to see a prettier or more intuitive installer than the last one you tried... Now you can use the whole system before you install anything. Doesn't get any better or easier for someone new to the Linux world than that.
Arnie
@Arno: I thought Unbuntu was just a bashing name we made up at the Debian forums?? Mr. Green Just like Ubantu!

But hey, with such a name you're asking for it...
Arno v. Lumig
Arnie wrote:
@Arno: I thought Unbuntu was just a bashing name we made up at the Debian forums?? Mr. Green Just like Ubantu!

But hey, with such a name you're asking for it...


Well, I've seen some people seriously claim that Unbuntu is the best Linux (Lunix?) out there.
But why not stop talking shit about it's name? Looking at the color scheme I think that has happened enough already... Laughing
This is getting ubunuts...
xbcd
The name is from another language, (for the life of me i can't remember except that its spoken in Africa).

It means community and togetherness (or something along those lines)
Arnie
Arno v. Lumig wrote:
But why not stop talking shit about it's name? Looking at the color scheme I think that has happened enough already... Laughing
LOL, it's true actually!
xbcd
ubuntu is really simple to install (done it on several computers) no issues, tho the color scheme is lacking, i haven't seen any recent chat about a BETTER distro to use. just alot of bashing, so what is your belief of the BEST OS?
Arnie
Debian... Ubuntu is basically Debian unstable released as "stable" with some hype around it.
Pkshields
devroom wrote:
Did not see any ubuntu here.

i believe that's the 1 to start with.
    It's easy and free to get (without any costs - no shipping, post)
    Its only about the 600 mb (i believe Cool )


And if u like linux you can download or buy (about $3,- per cd)
some other distro.

I also have Ubuntu, the easiest to start with
eznet
Arnie wrote:
Debian... Ubuntu is basically Debian unstable released as "stable" with some hype around it.


I think that more specifically Ubuntu is Debian made more user friendly (although this is by no means discrediting the 'hype' accusation - that is true as well). I used Debian for a long time and loved it - still do, but for accessibility to the majority of average PC owners (many of which hardly qualify as "users") Ubuntu takes the edges off of setup. Ubuntu takes the moderately easy installation of a fully functioning Debian system and makes it so easy a 1st grader could install a comparable Ubuntu system.
LostOverThere
Arno v. Lumig wrote:
Arnie wrote:
@Arno: I thought Unbuntu was just a bashing name we made up at the Debian forums?? Mr. Green Just like Ubantu!

But hey, with such a name you're asking for it...


Well, I've seen some people seriously claim that Unbuntu is the best Linux (Lunix?) out there.
But why not stop talking shit about it's name? Looking at the color scheme I think that has happened enough already... Laughing
This is getting ubunuts...


In my opinion Ubuntu is the best distro. Having said that, Linux is all about choice, dont agree with me. Try something else. I like Ubuntu for its ease of use, massive community, new features, ease of configuration and strong Debian backbone.

Don't like the colour scheme, at least it looks nicer then Debian's. Wink
Arnie
eznet wrote:
Ubuntu takes the moderately easy installation of a fully functioning Debian system and makes it so easy a 1st grader could install a comparable Ubuntu system.
Unbuntu (sic) may be easier to install/use but it comes nowhere near the reliability and stability of Debian, especially Etch. Besides, what's so hard about aptitude?
LostOverThere
Arnie wrote:
Unbuntu (sic) may be easier to install/use but it comes nowhere near the reliability and stability of Debian


I think most users would agree that Debian is a fantastic pure distro that's as stable as anything, but Ubuntu is just good for newbs. They both have different aims and goals, Debian aims to be a strong, reliable, pure distro. While Ubuntu aims to use some of the latest technology while appealing to people who dont know anywhere nearly as much as your average Debian user.
thimpat
Ubuntu because it is really easy to use
grafke
Fedora, easy to use. Great support, stable. Rpm based. If have things to do better than to fix something, try fedora..
LostOverThere
grafke wrote:
Fedora, easy to use. Great support, stable. Rpm based. If have things to do better than to fix something, try fedora..


RPM Based...that's a great reason to not pick it. DEB is much better in my opinion.
blinx
Fedora 8! Take a look at it...

It has a really great interface, I am thinking of installing it on one of my PCs.
LostOverThere
blinx wrote:
Fedora 8! Take a look at it...

It has a really great interface, I am thinking of installing it on one of my PCs.


...? You mean GNOME/KDE?

You get the same deal with the majority of Linux Distro's.
sanalskumar
I currently use Windows Xp service Pack 2 PC. And I want to change to Linux. I tried to install Red Hat Linux, but the attempt failed because I use a SATA hard disk and the hard disk is not being identified. I dont know the reason. But the need to install an open sourse OS is urgent, so I thought to consult the forum. Please help me out here...
LostOverThere
Red Hat is by far the worst way to start Linux.

I know hundreds of people have probably said this to you, but really, give Ubuntu a go.

It is by far the easiest and best way to start out with Linux.
Arnie
The worst? You haven't tried Gentoo yet?
LostOverThere
Arnie wrote:
The worst? You haven't tried Gentoo yet?


Hehe, ok ok. One of the worst. Happy?
Arnie
Tried ArchLinux? MuLinux? I can sum up loads of distros that are a pain to get installed in the first place. Razz
BrianElliott0218
...in most cases anyway.

Linux has become almost main stream now. There is still a learning curve for it, but that was the case when you bought MicroSoft's OS too. That which is new to you is not always easy right out of the box.

Linux has many, and I repeat "MANY", distributions (called distros by the Linux Community). The best are the ones that have what you want and need on them. The software that comes bundled is amazing and is installed with your OS when you do the main installation on your system (some systems you can run right off the CD to see how you like it, but be aware that an OS running of a CD drive is going to be MUCH slower than how it will work on your machine fully installed.

As to software included, most now include an open source "office suite". This is what I like to call the Microsoft killer software. Most folks don't realize that most of the open source office suites can actually open and save in the miscrosoft office formats. This includes the spreadsheet, word processor and in many cases the presentation software. Other applications are usually installed as part of the install too:
Graphics Apps
Games
Internet Applications (these usually bow away the MS versions that come bundled)

There are one for one replacements for various Windows environment apps, but more importantly, you can find better ones that give you more functionality. For instance, the MS Messenger program is easily replaced with Pidgin. You sign on and you can use it, but then again, Pidgin can also run simultaneously with and MSN chat as well as ICQ, AoL, Yahoo and others...

There are many applications that are fully developed by the Open Source Community that run as well as, take up less HDD space, and have lower cost of ownership than any microsoft (or even Mac OS). These applications are all available for Linux, and cost nothing. Donwload it and it runs in most cases.

Now the down side to the Linux Environment...
Do you have software that you can't do without? Some of it may run on Linux in an emulator mode. One such emulator on Linux is called WINE (WINdows Emulator). Wine was developed, like most innovation in computing, mostly to run games that run in the WIN platform. It runs mroe than that now, but is not consistent in how it runs them from one app to another.

The other kicker that you may run into with Linux (though I have never had the problem myself) is the driver issue. If you have hardware that is manufactured by a company that is all about the windows platform, and doesn't really worry about Linux and other "minor" operation systems, then they may not produce a driver for your hardware. The solution is to write your own (not for most people) or to find one written for your componant (more likely, but not 100%), or replace componants that are not already Linux compatible.

If you have further Linux questions, you can find it online, or you can contact me directly.
I'm working on making a Linux built PC that runs on low power consumption and works out of the box. Not an expert yet, but working on it. Have been building and supporting WinBoxes for many years, and I think that Linux is a great alternative to the high cost of owning a Windows system.

Good luck!
~BE
www.BEEnterprises.com
LostOverThere
Drivers aren't really an issue these days. They were once upon a time, but now you're generally pretty good, especially with *Ubuntu.
Arnie
Except for wireless network cards. And exotic hardware (old serial/parallel devices)
sanalskumar
okey. How can I get a copy of ubundu linux? Well i would also like to know if my current windows os would have any problems with installing ubundu? thanks
Arnie
If you don't know what you're doing, don't do it. You should probably just try a live CD, that won't do any damage.
sanalskumar
Yes I do. i know exactly what i'm doing. I was asking that because i just wanted to know if there is any ways to keep my current windows OS. Thats all.
Arnie
Well since you're consistently writing it Ubundu, and are not able to get an ISO yourself, I wonder if you really do.

Although I myself like to misspell the U-word on purpose because it's such a sucky name... Very Happy

To get to your question, afaik Ubantu has some function that automatically makes a dualboot with your Windows. But I've also seen some threads where people got in trouble with that and ended up with a corrupted Grub, so it's at your own risk. In fact using the U-distribution in the first place is at your own risk... Not talking
LostOverThere
Arnie wrote:
Well since you're consistently writing it Ubundu, and are not able to get an ISO yourself, I wonder if you really do.

Although I myself like to misspell the U-word on purpose because it's such a sucky name... Very Happy

To get to your question, afaik Ubantu has some function that automatically makes a dualboot with your Windows. But I've also seen some threads where people got in trouble with that and ended up with a corrupted Grub, so it's at your own risk. In fact using the U-distribution in the first place is at your own risk... Not talking


Please, some common-sense is needed here. For starters, it's Ubuntu. Secondly, you can get it here http://ubuntu.com

By the way Arnie, if you didn't know, Ubuntu is an African word. The name might be a little strange at first, but surely its better then Debian. "I run my wife on my computer" Wink
Arnie
Please LostOverThere, some sense of sarcasm is needed here. Brick wall

And the name sounds worse every time I hear it.
LostOverThere
Please Arnie, I was really tired when I wrote that. Brick wall

And Ubuntu is an awesome name. Like I said, much better then Debian anyway.
welshsteve
I've only tried two Linux O/S, Mandriva and DSL. DSL is ideal for keeping on a USB stick, Mandriva is an excellent one. I plan to tr Ubuntu very soon.
BrianElliott0218
What I have tried and what I have liked and what has worked 'out of the box'.
Ubuntu - Gnome desktop. A very nice install. I liked the LAMP server installation as well, not to be confused with the desktop version, though you can install all the server pieces after install and have a 'heavy' server. Great way to go if you're into having your own web development server on your desk (that's what I'll be doing with it).
Kubuntu - KDE desktop version of Ubuntu. Nice OS, but needs tweaking due to the Ubuntu need to NOT install proprietary software. So you have to install Flash plugins and such. Not real downside there with the software available. Kubuntu doesn't seem to get the same level of attention as Ubuntu, though the KDE desktop seems fairly popular on other distros.
MythBuntu - Since I don't have some of the required hardware for a front-end and back-end for this Media Center / DVR server/entertainment system, all I can say is that I am going shopping for the missing pieces! Built on Ubuntu, but I can't tell you what desktop manager is running... It looks good, and I can't wait to set it up with my big screen TV and stereo system!
Knoppix - Great looking KDE distro! Needs a little work to get all your web software working, but it's not a big deal. About 20mins and you're all set.
Mandriva - Works right out of the box! Great looking KDE interface with Compiz Fusion running. Gotta love those wobbly windows! Like most of the distros out there, comes with a fine assortment of applications ready to run. No games installed though. That's different from most installs, BUT they are all available on apt-get and such...
FreeSpire - This is the free spinoff of LinSpire (used to be Lindows until M$ stopped them in court). Install was easy, and the installation has what you need for webstuff right on install.
Sabayon Mini Edition - Didn't inspire me, nothing special, and nothing really worked when I finished the installation. Kept getting crash notices. The OS didn't crash though. Not one of my favorites, but that may be due in part to my low level of experience.
FreeNAS - though not really a Linux Distro for desktop use (a FreeBSD spinoff) very useful for it's purpose. Backups on your network.

Installs that I couldn't get to boot up at all included:
gOS - Looked like it was going to fly, then fell flat on boot up. Install didn't give any indication of issues either.
Gentoo - I was very excited about this one, but it too fell flat after the installation. It even started up nicely with the shiney splash screen at boot time. Very disappointed. I have heard many good things about this distro...

I am still looking at various installations, but I have not found one that really beats the support that is available for Ubuntu. I have also found a big downside to Linux distros that is somewhat disturbing... All of the Linux distros I have tried so far have had slow internet downloads. In most cases download speeds were slower than uploads! Not one of the Linux installs I have done (and they were installed, not just run from the Live CDs) has had better than 5000kbsp on speedtest.net. My WinXP box gets speeds of 20000kbps on the same lines. I have cable. Anyone have an answer for this one? (don't try to tell me about the IPv6 issue either as that only made the connections about 100kbps faster.)

Desktops:
There are 4 that get used a lot. In order of popularity (as far as I can tell):
KDE - Nice interface that is very extensable. Compiz Fusion is a recommended package for this.
Gnome - Nice interface. Gets a lot of play from the Ubuntu community.
xfce - A tight interface that gets the job done. Distros for older hardware, or 'need for speed' might like this interface due to the trim cut features, and low resource overhead. Those who like eye candy may not think as much of it. Runs on Xubuntu.
Enlightenment - Also called "e" had a hard time finding a distro that had this one on it for free... Would still like to get my hands on this desktop to get a feel of it.
Other Desktop environments you may see include: Aston, EDE, GEM, IRIX Interactive Desktop, Mezzo, Project Looking Glass, ROX Desktop, UDE, Xito. None of these match the popularity of the first four I listed. Every one of the big four Desktops offer the capability to modify them to something quite unique from the original installation. That is the main draw to Linux for a lot of people; the capacity to make the system do precisely what they want from it. There are people out there making Mock OS X... Linux Desktops that have been pushed and prodded (usually with the help of Compiz Fusion) to look and feel just like a Mac OS X machine.

Another thing that each Desktop Environment brings with it is a set of applications that the environment runs well with, and is usually designed around a specific purpose during the development of the Linux Distro being created. There are distros for video editing and reviewing, web design, publishing, you name it, there's a Linux Distro that is aimed at it. From science to gaming, they've got a distro designed for your needs, or one that can easliy be twisted to your demands.

All in all I think there's a Linux out there for most people IF they are interested in finding lot's of Open Source FreeWare to use on their current hardware (whatever that may be). I have been looking for a LAMP server and have also been looking at getting my hands on a newer Mac OS X machine, but now that I have found Linux is easy to install and has most of the bells and whistles that I want, I may just keep my PC's and run Linux. There are many 'replacements' for the software you currently use on a PC, and you can find them here: http://linuxappfinder.com/. There are M$ compatible Office Suites available on every Linux Distro I have seen. Files created with these office suites can open and be opened by M$ versions, and I have read of no problems with this compatibility.
----------------------------------------------------
The one downside I have found:
If anyone can tell me the solution to the Linux download issue I'd be very happy to hear about it! I am really liking Linux and would hate to keep using M$winblows just because it has a faster internet download capacity...

Thank you and good night! Very Happy
~Brian Elliott
NeophyteByte.com
karthike
Which linux version is best ?

Red Hat
Ubuntu/Kubuntu/Edubuntu
Fedora
Suse
DoctorBeaver
It depends on what you want to do, how good you are with Linux, and whether you want cutting edge (which have the accasional bug) or safe and trustworthy.

If you just want it to develop php programs, then try something like JSAS (Joomla Stand Alone Server). That comes with Apache, mySQL, php and php MyAdmin. It's very easy to install and is very robust.

Apache is one of the best if you want to run a server.

If, however, you just want a PC running Linux then it's down to personal preference. I use Debian. It's outdated compared to, say, Ubuntu, but it's bug-free.
fadirocks
for Desktop I liked Mandriva it's very neat Smile
Ubuntu is pretty good too that's what i finally installed on my mother's computer because it came with tons of card games & that's what she basically wants to do plus little bit of internet

I personally hate Redhat because of earlier bad experience and I'm not sure where they stand at this time especially I'm so outdated with Linux knowledge

If you want to just try out linux you have many choices but mostly Debian based
Knoppix, Ubuntu (other buntu stuff), Mandriva, Damn Small Linux, Morphix, ...umm probably few more that i missed
kerryworkman
karthike wrote:
Which linux version is best ?

Red Hat
Ubuntu/Kubuntu/Edubuntu
Fedora
Suse


I am no linux user I have only played around with it, which is why I liked knoppix. You can run it from a CD without any partitioning or having to install it on my computer. It gives you a chance to get a feel for linux without any commitment. But as I said I don't know enough about linux to give any real advice about it. The best bet would probably be to figure out what you are going to be using it for and do a little research to see which one would best suit your needs.
mehulved
karthike wrote:
Which linux version is best ?

Red Hat
Ubuntu/Kubuntu/Edubuntu
Fedora
Suse

There's no such thing as best linux. If there was such a thing, everyone will be using only that distribution. You need to understand that people have varying needs. Different distributions cater to those varying needs.
Also, there's an element of personal preference and comfort. One person maybe comfortable with distro A bit another one will be comfortable with B and so on.
You just can't judge it like that.
Still, if you provide more information like how much of linux do you know, what use you want to put it to, what are your expectations out of it, etc then people maybe able to guide you further. Even then each one will be more of less baised by their personal preference. And you may not get the same experience that some other person got even if both had same needs and expectations.
dac_nip
I think the question of "which is best" just doesn't fit right. First of all, all linux system has the same basic structure. kernel, filesystem..etc. they just differ in the kind of desktop they used and the kind of packaging (debian-base, rpm. etc..). Depending on your taste, you could opt to choose any of the distributions available. But rest assured that in terms of functionality, they are pretty much the same. though some might specialize in some function. anyway, currently I'm using mandriva, its suits my taste and i don't have any problems with it. just go ahead and try using one of them, experiment. if you don't like it, then shift to other distributions. its that simple:D
corrupt
I generally tend to like linux distros based on red hat. We use CentOS(redhat based) at work on a majority of the servers and it seems to do the job pretty damn well. Haven't tried many distros for desktop use, but i have heard good things about ubuntu and there seems to be a heap of support for it aswell.
rlashares
well.. choosing a linux distro clearly depends on yer needs...
if u want a distro for home entertainment.. I'd suggest dream linux
for learning linux.. shell scripting n all... i think knoppix gr8...
for more info on linux distros check out distrowatch.com....
qscomputing
I use Ubuntu as my only day-to-day OS, and it works fine for me. It does depend on your needs though, and there is no single "best" distro. I recommend trying Ubuntu to start with though.
pkir
I use Ubuntu Linux on my desktop : I have also tried Fedora and Mandrake, but I think the Ubuntu is really easy to install, easy to use, a wide range of supported hardware (I have installed it on different Laptops with specific video cards : no problem)

The other argument is that it is based on a Debian, which is one of the really best linux distribution : we use it at work on 13 servers, and I am really happy with it.
pkir
I also find Ubuntu is very good : I work with it on 2 computers (desktop and laptop) : easy to install, easy to use, great hardware compatibility

We have also started to replace some Windows PC by Ubuntu and the first user feedback are good.

Another argument : it is based on Debian , known to be an high quality and very stable distro.


I believe that the other distros also have their own qualities, so I would advice to try : it is free, so there is no risk !
kansloos
I have never used, Redhat's normal linux, but I did use their other child Fedora... I am actually quite happy about it; comes with an easy installer and everything works out of the box. Same goes for Ubuntu.

I find Fedora's installer to be better, but Ubuntu has more nice, shiny and handy features (like automatic Videocard drivers download&install) and the Human theme is just so nice Very Happy. note that these 2 distro's are aimed for normal home-use, I wouldn't recommend Fedora or Ubuntu for server systems, better to take something more stable like Debian for that use.

And SUSE is really just a pile of shit, I used it once on a VPS Server and it was so crappy; the yast thingy kept crashing on me. >.< So I had good ol trusty Debian installed on it.
foRs
hmm... I used redhat, kubunta, mandriva 2007-2008 Powerpack, OpenSuSe (from NOvell), slackware
And my choice is OpenSuSe 10.3 this system very comfortable, and very stability (in good hands all OS working Smile ) Many people love Slackware (author Patrick Valckerning), because in this OS include packages which tested and working at 100%

We can't help to u , we only can take some advice about other linux system. Your choice will be in your experience of linux. For first u must take any simple linux distribution , look at that, try to working with some programs what u need (office, media...) Then u can install other distr, and u see what kind of distr linux like for you. Make your choice and enjoy ^_^
jeremyp
DoctorBeaver wrote:
I use Debian. It's outdated compared to, say, Ubuntu, but it's bug-free.

No it isn't. Ubuntu is Debian packaged nicely to make it easier for non Unix geeks to install and use.

I've installed both the desktop and the server version recently, and I am impressed. I'd recommend it to anybody, unlike SuSE Enterprise Server which wouldn't install on the Dell server it was supplied with.
[FuN]goku
jeremyp wrote:
DoctorBeaver wrote:
I use Debian. It's outdated compared to, say, Ubuntu, but it's bug-free.

No it isn't. Ubuntu is Debian packaged nicely to make it easier for non Unix geeks to install and use.

Ya ubuntu is like... every new linux users favorite distro for some reason, and ya as you said ubuntu is based off debian. I never really liked ubuntu because of .. well. it's too simplistic fo me. I like slackware and debian.

Anyways staying to the topic name. There isn't any 'Best' linux distro, it's mainly based on what you like and your level of *Nix knowledge. As i stated i prefer debian or slackware. If you're a beginner you may want to check out some 'windows-like' distros. Like xandros (which isn't free i believe) or Freespire, which was my first distro i tried.
zellfaze
[FuN]goku wrote:
Ya ubuntu is like... every new linux users favorite distro for some reason


That reason is it simple, I personally think its a great distro. I think Debain may be better for may things though. Personally I'm not a fan of Red-Hat or Fedora. I can't deal with yum.
[FuN]goku
zellfaze wrote:
[FuN]goku wrote:
Ya ubuntu is like... every new linux users favorite distro for some reason


That reason is it simple, I personally think its a great distro. I think Debain may be better for may things though. Personally I'm not a fan of Red-Hat or Fedora. I can't deal with yum.
I'll have to agree with you. I tried fedora at one point, and i didnt like it. And yum... err well idk.. its not that great. I prefer Aptitude @ debian.
mehulved
zellfaze wrote:
[FuN]goku wrote:
Ya ubuntu is like... every new linux users favorite distro for some reason


That reason is it simple, I personally think its a great distro. I think Debain may be better for may things though. Personally I'm not a fan of Red-Hat or Fedora. I can't deal with yum.

Well I do like ubuntu too and do recommend it to many people. But, somehow beyond desktop usage I find ubuntu has a couple bugs too many or just that I am unlucky enough to hit them like with slow performance with NFS server on edgy, the dash trouble on edgy, gpm bug in debian and ubuntu.
teko
I like gentoo myself once you get over the initial learning curve its much leaner. Although saying that for my old PIII laptop xubuntu or archlinux is much better as the compile times can be just a bit too much with gentoo for it
sjohnson
I really like Ubuntu because it's so user friendly. Of course, I'm pretty much a newbie to the Linux platform, but I really like the stability of it. I do have a Windows partition but I only use it when I have programs that I can't use on Linux. I know about the windows emulator, but I'm not certain about it. Perhaps I will brave it some day. For now, I'm happy with a windows partition.
adri
sjohnson wrote:
I really like Ubuntu because it's so user friendly. Of course, I'm pretty much a newbie to the Linux platform, but I really like the stability of it. I do have a Windows partition but I only use it when I have programs that I can't use on Linux. I know about the windows emulator, but I'm not certain about it. Perhaps I will brave it some day. For now, I'm happy with a windows partition.


You mean CrossOver? I had it on Ubuntu, but if you want a program, there are so much programs for Linux, like photoshop on windows, you can have The Gimp on Ubuntu...


Adri
dandickson
Ubuntu is definetly one of the best i've used. There is a lot of support for it and downloadable software and stuff. Just look how many other linux systems are based off ubuntu. I would also really recommend PCLinux OS. I think it is better than Ubuntu but has less downloads and support because of its rpm base.
smspno
Personally, I recommend Ubuntu. I think it's the best distribution for migration from Windows due to its stability, quickness and very friendly community which gave me assistance many times.
bulek
I recommend you Ubuntu linux distribution which is the most popular and the moment so the support for it is great as well.
jontyboy
Ubuntu is definetley the best. I used it for over 6 months and had no problems with it once i learnt the sudo command.. Its easy to navigate and a lot simpler than Windows though the only problem is that the compatibility with Windows programs that I was using. Though some of this problem was fixed when i got the Free windows emulator Wine. Also the forums on the Ubuntu website are great I've got a lot of things fixed from their. Smile
Studio Madcrow
I happen to love OpenSUSE, but the kids these days seem to prefer Ubuntu...
MrBlueSky
Studio Madcrow wrote:
I happen to love OpenSUSE, but the kids these days seem to prefer Ubuntu...


Me too. I have tried different distro's over time, but I always wind up with SUSE. I recently installed OpenSuse 10.3. It is more targeted at experienced Linux-users, but I think it isn't much harder to install than Ubuntu. Most of the expert options are 'hidden', and just clicking OK will install a nice system.

I also like that you don't have to choose between Gnome and KDE right in the beginning. And that you can choose the packages to install during installation.

Another nice thing about SuSE is the easy way to install, configure and enable servers using the Yast configuration interface. For example, setting up a LAMP-server manually is not very difficult, but it is a lot of work. Yast makes this very easy, including configuring virtual hosts. To setup a LAMP-server automatically in Ubuntu you have to download the server edition, which comes with some taksel tasks for setting up some common services.

The only thing I don't like about SuSE is the package management using Yast. It is strange, slow and ugly.
frih
you ctry ubuntu or knoppix. both of them are free. you can also get ubuntu linux free of cost to your home. just fill up the form on their website and they will delivered it free. i also got one free of cost at home by post.
their website is www.ubuntu.com


regards
abhi
LostOverThere
Knoppix is a great live cd. But I can never get my wired internet to work. Confused

Any suggestions?
Flarkis
In my opinion get knoppix because of the large amount of packages that come shiped with it
geschichteonline
hello
my favorite linux is the Opensuse 10.3. It's very stable and uncomplex. But I also like the Mandriva for Desktops.
nmoutaa
Hi,
I vote for Fedora Smile
csoftdev
i happened to be a fedora user and i have been using it for many years since it was called redhat. it is a stable and user friendly distro of linux. i suggested that anyone who wants to try out linux to try out fedora.
lastelement0
i myself have completed a switch from Windows to Linux (Ubuntu). i chose ubuntu because it has a large software base as well as great support in terms of their forums and their IRC channel. chances are high that when you are having a problem with something, someone else has had the same problem. even better is that before 7.1 i had some issues installing onto my Dell Laptop, but once Dell and Ubuntu started "working" together, i had no issues in terms of drivers on my install. i currently have my Ubuntu configured basically how i want, using the desktop effects for some eye candy, and also have XP in virtualbox so i can access the things that i REALLY need for my courses.

all in all, i'd definately say go Ubuntu. very easy to set up and quick as well. also majority of your hardware if not all should work from the beginning. if you are concerned pop over to their forums and post your setup and someone there should most likely be able to tell you if there is anything you have to worry about.
Ramelof
I think Ubuntu or openSUSE is good opraring system.
eznet
I recently tried out the newest Ubuntu, Hardy Heron, and must say it is a nice OS. There are still some bugs, but its in early Beta, so what is to be expected.

I see a lot of newcomers asking about options that will allow them to keep their windows install. Hardy makes this ridiculously easy with the Wubi Installer (read a little about it at lifehacker). With most distros you need at least a couple partitions for Linux. If you installed windows before deciding to try Linux, then you likely filled up your hard drive with windows and so resizing to make room for Linux will beyond what many people are comfortable doing. With hardy there is a new install option that is similar in some ways to running a virtual machine, except hardware access is not virtual.. Basically it will create a virtual drive inside of Windows (basically a file in Windows) and will install Ubuntu there. Then, when you reboot a menu will appear after Windows begins to load to ask which OS you want to load (kinda like the Safe Mode menu for windows)!!! It has never been more painless to install Linux!

Oh, and Gentoo bashing is not cool! Its a GREAT (maybe the BEST) Linux flavor - if you know what you are doing and like compiling... I, personally, have never had a faster running flavor of Linux than Gentoo!!! Granted, it is not for the faint of heart or slow in mind Smile

-Matt
zjosie729
I think ubuntu is the best. I use Ubuntu now but I used to use xubuntu, which is really fast but lacks some features, and kubuntu's window decorations don't suit me.
nabil
I have used many linux OSs
ill recommend that if you want good graphical interface then use ubuntu.
otherwise you can use any other you want.
undeath
i dont like all the *buntu stuff... reminds me on Windows >.<

I think one of the best linux is Debian! Or when you are interessted in network security: Backtrack2 (my favourite)


greez Undeath
PANTONEPIRATE
yep ill go the geek Smile
slack is not a big as it used to be though but debian seems to be comming along nicely.
I dont use linux much anymore tending to use solaris and bsd more but when I do fire
up my little nix book its debian thats driving it.
cosmicx
I would definitely vote for Ubuntu for Linux beginners...
haha, you can learn a lot through this distro...
besides that, it would be a good option if you are trying to migrate from Windows Razz
csoftdev
i use fedora myself and i have been using it since it was called redhat back then and before the redhat enterprise era. now it is called fedora and I have been using it sinc efedora 1. I have tried few other distros too, and I heard that ubuntu/kubuntu/xubuntu is very user friendly and easy to use.
Kelcey
All my friends use Ubuntu. When I have to, I use Fedora and it's a lot better than what Linux was just a few years ago.
biljap
I’ve tried Fedora few years ago and I liked using it. It’s very user friendly and although I was always using Windows, I successfully installed all software I wanted and I made everything look the way I like. The only problem with Fedora was that I couldn’t find all the drivers I need for my hardware…
And recently I decided to try Ubuntu because all of my friends are using it and they said that it’s excellent. Ubuntu recognized my hardware but I couldn’t install software I need… maybe I wasn’t patient enough, I might try it one more time… And yes… There was one more problem with Ubuntu – I couldn’t start Windows using its menu.
Warriorcz
So, I think Kubuntu is the best one of this selection. I'm not using it (Gentoo forever), but I have good experience with Kubuntu.

My sister have it on her computer and there is no problem. I installed it two months ago and I haven't had to care about it yet.

However, I haven't tried Fedora and Red Hat, so I can't compare much...
LostOverThere
We use Fedora at school for some of the computers, it seems quite nice, however they're still stuck with Fedora Core 3 so I can't really compare. Rolling Eyes
Davidgr1200
I like Puppy Linux. It is quite small and fast but can still do most of what I want an OS to do. It also seems to be more compatible than most other versions of Linux I have tried. It's worth having a CD with it on for the times when Windows stops working and you need to retrieve files which you have on your disk. You can also, apparently, run it on a flash dirve, though I haven't tried it....yet.
tiruveedhula
Suse Rocks!!!.. I love SUSE and also prefer SUSE. I have started linux with suse only. It is very comfortable and good looking also. Using suse for the past 2 years. and with compiz installed on suse you will get a 3D desktop and other effects(fire,woobling,rain,shading and lots of....). Have a try with suse..........Suse ROcks......
LostOverThere
I more prefer the Debian based systems, but if SUSE does it for you by all means, don't let anyone stop you from using it.
welshsteve
I have experience of three different linux distros.

1. Mandriva - very nice to look at, and easy to use. I really like this one.

2. Ubuntu - regarded by many as the easiest to learn and the best distro around. I like this one very much.

3. DSL - Damn Small Linux - compact and fits easily onto a memory stick (it's only around 50MB and comes with Firefox etc)
LostOverThere
Damn Small Linux is great, I use it on my old computer. However I'm not to sure why they included Firefox on it, Dillo works just fine.
bigt
Ubuntu

karthike wrote:
Which linux version is best ?

Red Hat
Ubuntu/Kubuntu/Edubuntu
Fedora
Suse
frih
hack_man_ wrote:
I currently have Windows XP (god help me) and want to change to Linux. I know that Linux is open-source, but does that mean that it is free? I have no idea on the matter so I decided to consult the forums.

EDIT: New question. See topic title

Stickied by Animal - 31 May 06


ubuntu is a very nice linux....moreover it is free and also you can request CDs from the website the website is www.ubuntu.com .....they deliver the cds free of cost to your home....you need a valid email account for requesting cds.....you have to fill some basic information such as name,address,country,etc....they will delivered the cd free of cost to your home. delivery is done within 2 months. i got 2 cds from ubuntu



tak care

hav a gud time


regards
abhi
eznet
Just an update (and reiteration), anyone looking for a ridiculously easy Linux distro to give a run, hit up the newest Ubuntu - Hardy Heron. It doesn't get any easier than it is with Hardy Heron! As is the usual case with Ubuntu, it is easy to get up and running with Ubuntu, something more true now than before.
With Wubi, users are allowed to install a copy of Ubuntu to their Windows partition (NTFS, FAT) without the need for repartitioning. Basically, Wubi will make a virtual partition in your existing partition (which is basically a big file) and then use the Windows boot menu (same one that safe mode uses) to allow you to pick Windows or Ubuntu to boot from. Using this configuration, not only is the user able to avoid partitioning, but the user also gets to take full advantage of their hardware, as this install method is a full install.
Of course, with this installment of the most recent Ubuntu, configuration couldn't be easier and the packages available 'out of the box', via synaptic, are likely more than enough for even the most advanced users. Hardware detection works great and most users will have 100% usage machine from the go - Personally, I have installed it on my quad core, SLI homebuilt computer with 100% usability as well as installing it on my dv6000T notebook with ~99% usability (sleep is buggy).
If you want power, ease of use and bleeding edge tech, then give Ubuntu Hardy Heron a go!

-Matt
bissoboa
myrevolt wrote:
gentoo from what i heard is a good distro (once its installed) though it has something like a 6 hour install (non-automated). whichever distro you choose good luck Smile


Gentoo is my favourite distribuition and I would raccomend it to anyone wanna get skilled with linux! Yes.. of course, truly the installation can last more than six ours. But it is step-by-step ducumented on the official website, and should be a pleasure! Wink It is the installation itself that really masters yourself this interesting world, so it worths the effort.
bulentix
i think fedora is the easiest version to install and work for a beginner.
http://fedoraproject.org/
eznet
bissoboa wrote:
myrevolt wrote:
gentoo from what i heard is a good distro (once its installed) though it has something like a 6 hour install (non-automated). whichever distro you choose good luck Smile


Gentoo is my favourite distribuition and I would raccomend it to anyone wanna get skilled with linux! Yes.. of course, truly the installation can last more than six ours. But it is step-by-step ducumented on the official website, and should be a pleasure! Wink It is the installation itself that really masters yourself this interesting world, so it worths the effort.


I agree. I tried Slackware first and Gentoo second... I loved Gentoo alot. And like you said, the steps are documented at their site - even with architecture specific tweaks... Gentoo taught me so much about Linux and although it was a bit difficult to grasp coming from a world of Windows, if you just follow the steps, you will end up with a functional system and in depth exposure the guts of Linux... So, if you have a free weekend and want to really learn, grab the Gentoo ISO, print out the instructions (really helps if you have another PC to reference), swap out your hard drive (if you are afraid of partitioning) and learn away!

-Matt
paultjepotlood
I like OpenSuse and Ubuntu best. I'm working on OpenSuse for 1,5 year now. you have to get deeper in some things to get it working. Installing programs can be hard sometimes. One minor thing of OpenSuse is Yast. it's very slow.... Also mounting was a problem, you had to change config files and stuff...

I discovered Ubuntu version 8.0.4 last month. I'm very content with it. the installation of programs is supereasy! Also to get video and audio up and running is easy because the program searches for codecs and installs them. That was a problem with opensuse, i had to spent several weeks on forums to find out how to get video up and running in opensuse.

I would recommend Ubuntu to beginners with linux.
the use of Ubuntu is almost similar to Windows.
Gushe
Hey, I have a little question.

I have an old pc here that I'd like to use as my Programming environment PC with a Linux system.
Mainly I want to use it for programming languages that support both windows & Linux such as C/C++, PHP, Perl, Python, JAVA,.. (I've still got to learn most of them though Razz)

But which Linux version would be the best to do this? Smile


Thanx in Advance;
~ GuShe! Wink
LostOverThere
How fast is this old computer you're running?
Gushe
I don't know exactly.

Something like 256mb RAM & 1.8Ghz CPU or lower. (CPU could also be 1.3Ghz.. Rolling Eyes)
BeGe
I have been using Debian for 12 years and see no reason to swtich.
marsupilami
BeGe wrote:
I have been using Debian for 12 years and see no reason to swtich.

First I want to correct this : "Which is the best Linux DISTRIBUTION"? (we use version when we talk about it's kernel).

How do you know which is the best, if you have not tried the other distributtions?

I think that each Linux distribution has own pluses. First, choice linux depends on our purposes (for desktops PC, servers, workstations, or just simple a router) . The statistic is : about >70% server and workstation use Linux OS, 5% others *nix (FreeBSD, Mac ...) , and the left use Windows server. For desktop pc >80% use Windows, and the others use Linux, or unix OS.

- For desktop PC I recommend Ubuntu (for beginner, which has nice interface, best for office, and webbrowsing), Madriva, openSuSE.
- For small server (included DNS, DHCP, LDAP, router, file server, NFS server ... etc) We can use many distribution such as Mandriva, Debian, SuSE, Fedora ...etc
- For powerful server (fileserver, webservices, supercomputer), I recommend use SuSE server, Redhat (AS - Advanced Server).

I'm now using SuSE enterprise server SP1 for my own web server, I think that this is a very stable distribution of Linux (a product of company Novell).
tdfranc
kerryworkman wrote:
karthike wrote:
Which linux version is best ?

Red Hat
Ubuntu/Kubuntu/Edubuntu
Fedora
Suse


I am no linux user I have only played around with it, which is why I liked knoppix. You can run it from a CD without any partitioning or having to install it on my computer. It gives you a chance to get a feel for linux without any commitment. But as I said I don't know enough about linux to give any real advice about it. The best bet would probably be to figure out what you are going to be using it for and do a little research to see which one would best suit your needs.


You can do that too with Ubuntu,
and if I can choose between Knoppix and Ubuntu, I choose Ubuntu,
but I prefer Linux From Scratch, it's way better...

see: http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/
sondosia
If I were you I would definitely start with Ubuntu. It's probably not the easiest distro to use (though it's still quite simple), but the community is huge and very helpful. You'll find quick answers for all your questions on the ubuntu forums.

Ubuntu is updated twice a year, which is great because that means it's constantly being improved. And it's free. It'll also work well with any flash drives, cameras, or mp3 players that you need to use. It's great. =)
Chinmoy
If you are interested in development works, install suse or redhat. If you want slick graphics, try Ubuntu. But make sure you have a ned to install linux. If you have used windows long enough, i would suggest stickin to it.
bissoboa
I'm looking forward to get gentoo 2008 with kde4 on my laptop... I haven't got spare time to make it but as soon as I can I will do. Someone of yours tried?
cod3rbro
Try Ubuntu, it is cool, you can get by shipit.ubuntu.com, it will fly to your home for free
schoenstattmx
the linux that is for you is Ubuntu, is the better in compatibility, i think, check out the caracteristics.

http://www.ubuntu.com/products/whatisubuntu

And its FREE!
thorsten
My operating system is Ubuntu.
In my opinion its the best OS.
Gnome (Desktop environment) is faster than KDE, like Suse or Kubuntu.
And of course Ubuntu has the biggest Community and the best package support.

I have Ubuntu for 5 years and there where no big problems, no virus or sth else.
LostOverThere
5 years...are you sure? Wink
Arnie
Good one LostOverThere. Yet another example of how the OSS hype distorts people's sense of reality. That really puts stuff like spreadfirefox in a proper perspective. Or, closer to home, this topic.
cavedog2
UltimateEdition.info Its the best linux ever made! Based on Ubuntu so its like ubuntu but added extra stuff. So it has to be better than ubuntu! Very Happy
Rosanova
cavedog2 wrote:
UltimateEdition.info Its the best linux ever made! Based on Ubuntu so its like ubuntu but added extra stuff. So it has to be better than ubuntu! Very Happy


Hi there,

I think that Ultimate Edition could be interesting for me. But sad to see that the most of their web site is "under construction".

But I'll keep visiting the site to see if they are serious or just an overnight sensation.

Cheers!
Arnie
cavedog2 wrote:
UltimateEdition.info Its the best linux ever made! Based on Ubuntu so its like ubuntu but added extra stuff. So it has to be better than ubuntu! Very Happy
By that argument, Windows Vista would be better than XP.
Subaru
First of all Linux is completely free not counting some distributions that makes pay versions too
You can even download it through p2p things - nobody can say it is illegal especially that some distributions have their torrent files to download and burn on DVD ^_^
Problems starts when You want it in corporation (I mean not in home) for example here in Poland You have to have uhm "proof of buying" I mean You should go to shop buy newspaper with DVD (for today it would be about 15 dollars for US) and have some proof of buying it from the shop, then You are clear ^_^

Now about best Linux... again like in best OS topic there is now one best Linux...it depends what You want from it, for example they say that Ubuntu is good to start (for newbies) but I learned on other one and I don't say "too bad I didn't have Ubuntu" there is a web page which helps to choose Linux but it is in Polish not English Sad
bissoboa
Quote:
Subaru Now about best Linux... again like in best OS topic there is now one best Linux...it depends what You want from it

I very agree with this...
Another thing I have noticed it is difficult to use linux in a typical industrial organization, so you go to work and always have to deal with winzoz Mad
tsuvik
I guess Ubuntu is the fastest growing version of Linux. So its worth a try. Else there is always Redhat and Fedora version of Linux which is hugely popular
Arnie
bissoboa wrote:
it is difficult to use linux in a typical industrial organization, so you go to work and always have to deal with winzoz Mad
The other employees probably complain they go to work and always have to deal with a certain annoying coworker... but of courses "Winzoz" is far worse.

The boogyman is sooo last century, nowadays you scare your children with the "Winzoz". Here's a free tip: it looks even scarier when you use the $ symbol.
snowynight
I used ubuntu. A very nice os. However only few programmes can run under ubuntu. So then i gave up. You know, I use ps, audition etc in my work.
snowynight
I used ubuntu. A very nice os. However only few programmes can run under ubuntu. So then i gave up. You know, I use ps, audition etc in my work.
rebill
You can try OpenSUSE , CentOS , Ubuntu , Debian and FreeBSD ,then deside which one to use.
Fire Boar
rebill wrote:
You can try OpenSUSE , CentOS , Ubuntu , Debian and FreeBSD ,then deside which one to use.


I wouldn't. Downloading all that stuff is a pain. And FreeBSD isn't even Linux.
amperx
ubuntu would be a good choice, very good os, updates are regular, and a growing community, it may not have all the applications that you'll need in your work though
Fire Boar
amperx wrote:
ubuntu would be a good choice, very good os, updates are regular, and a growing community, it may not have all the applications that you'll need in your work though


Come to think of it, Ubuntu/Kubuntu/Xubuntu/Edubuntu Hardy Heron (the latest version) is exactly what it says on the tin: it's rock solid stable. It's also getting long-term support (for the benefit of businesses who don't want to update every 6 months to the new distribution).
mshafiq
Can someone let m know which one is best for my objective;

HTTP hosting
php running
mySQL running

I am using Fedora 7 but it is very heavy.

Is there anything which gives GUI interface as work station + acts as server with minimal disk space consumption?

Thanks in Advance

-- Regards

Why Linux? "Why not Linux"
eznet
Fire Boar wrote:
rebill wrote:
You can try OpenSUSE , CentOS , Ubuntu , Debian and FreeBSD ,then deside which one to use.


I wouldn't. Downloading all that stuff is a pain. And FreeBSD isn't even Linux.


Having tried nearly every major distro, and many small distros, I think that this great advice. I guess that if you consider downloading 5 ISO's a pain, perhaps Linux will be too big a 'pain' to run and you should consider windows or MacOS X. I think that downloading various flavors and seeing which one suits you is exactly what someone wanting to know what version to use should do. There is no real practical reason not to download multiple versions, unless you pay your ISP per MB.

Anyone curious, go download some of the more popular distros (distrowatch is a great place to learn about them) and install them - either on your PC or in a virtual PC. Play with them, research how compatible they are 'out of the box' with your model of PC or hardware and go from there and decide what to use. They are free and all you have to invest is the time to click the file to save it, to click it to burn it and to boot it to try it (unless you do it in a virtual PC, in which case, click to download and click to mount in your virtual pc app Smile )!
Fire Boar
Debian sounds ideal. Install either Gnome or KDE (I personally prefer KDE, you have to look up how to install Debian with KDE though since Gnome is default) for the GUI and synaptic for installing packages. Debian is good because it is very lightweight so you only end up installing the packages you need.
Fire Boar
eznet wrote:
There is no real practical reason not to download multiple versions, unless you pay your ISP per MB.


Not everyone has unlimited broadband you know. Smile Some of us are on PAYGo or even dial-up.
bissoboa
Quote:
Arnie The other employees probably complain they go to work and always have to deal with a certain annoying coworker... but of courses "Winzoz" is far worse.

Oh yes that's true! Laughing
Quote:
eznet So, if you have a free weekend and want to really learn, grab the Gentoo ISO, print out the instructions (really helps if you have another PC to reference), swap out your hard drive (if you are afraid of partitioning) and learn away!

Yes. For the installation it is raccomanded working near a computer with internet, so you always have online manual support and instructions to follow. PS: Don't be afraid of partitioning: it a triky part of the game!
welshsteve
I've tried a few new flavours of linux now.

Linux Mint is very nice.
furtasacra
Warriorcz wrote:
So, I think Kubuntu is the best one of this selection. I'm not using it (Gentoo forever), but I have good experience with Kubuntu.

My sister have it on her computer and there is no problem. I installed it two months ago and I haven't had to care about it yet.


I'm a Linux newbie (relatively speaking, been using Ubuntu for a few months) and I agree that Kubuntu is probably the most painless Linux for a transitioning Windows user. I got my 20 year old nephew to install Kubuntu for my 16 year old niece.

Her Windows XP machine was so riddled with viruses and spyware that it hardly worked at all. It was horrific; it has a 2 gig processor, 2 gig of RAM and high-speed internet, but it was running slower than my "antique" P133 from 1995.

Niecey is happy with Kubuntu. She can email, chat, surf the net, and make stupid sparkly graphics for her MySpace profile to her heart's content, and now that the printer works, she can type up and print her homework for school.

To quote her directly, "It's pretty and it works."

Coming from a (non-geek) teenage girl, that's probably the best endorsement you can get.

But back to the original topic, I don't think there is any BEST Linux distro. That's like asking what's the best flavor of ice cream. The best Linux is the one that suits your needs. but that's what I like about Linux; it comes in different flavors.
mshafiq
I would like to try
Debian
and
Linux Mint

would you please mention download link.

And is it possible to have USB bootable stuff. I have 4GB USB.

-- Regards
Agent ME
furtasacra wrote:
Her Windows XP machine was so riddled with viruses and spyware that it hardly worked at all. It was horrific; it has a 2 gig processor, 2 gig of RAM and high-speed internet, but it was running slower than my "antique" P133 from 1995.

It seems like if I go to a friend's house ever, their computer will be relatively new, hardware that makes me drool slightly, but it will be filled with viruses, and therefore they think the computer is a cheap piece of crap and considering throwing it away and replacing it (while I'm staring at the graphics card jealous). Seeing good hardware about to go to waste is probably the number one reason I like to advocate linux to my friends.

I set up linux on an old neglected computer at a friend's house, set up some games and tweaked the settings right, and now it gets used as much, if not more, than the other computers and seems to run the best and most consistently.

I like to use Ubuntu because I'm familiar with it, but I haven't tried any others. I've heard Ubuntu is good with many types of hardware out of the box and what I've seen agrees with that. Install is straightforward - the most complex step is partitioning the hard-drive, only because it has a few choices that appear complex to new users, but its default setting is good.
warriorpoets
Pretty simple really. If you want a desktop machine with newest apps, Ubuntu is the way to go. If you want a solid server environment you can rely on, Debian is the way to go. If you want to geek out, and build a bleeding edge dev box with custom compiled stuff optimized to hell and back, Gentoo is the way to go.
djclue917
In my humble opinion, I think that choosing Linux distros is just a matter of preference nowadays. Most of them package the same software which works virtually the same across different distributions. Anyway, I generally consider the popularity, commercial support/interest, size of community, and other factors that suggest the "success" of a Linux distro.

I personally prefer Kubuntu. One reason is that it is Debian-based (I just don't like RPM-based distros, I don't know why...). Another is that its main desktop now is KDE 4-based. And probably another important factor that I've considered is the fact that K/Ubuntu has a very large user base, very active community, and a nice commercial backing from Canonical.

Just my two cents.
Fire Boar
Which Linux is the best? Currently, the best version is the latest: Linux 2.6.
ehpc
Ubuntu is best linux for home use. It's simple, cute and stable. And absolutely free.
Chinmoy
ubuntu rocks. Opensolaris is good as well..
debsuvra
For me. Ubuntu Intrepid Ibex is not so good, when Fedora 10 is going to be a rocking release next month.
mshafiq
I liked/like Fedora

HD crashed, installed Fedora again.
I vote for Fedora too.

I have a question, how to make a usb that will boot Fedora and will act as HD (to save settings/changes, installing/updating software etc...)

I know we can make bootable Fedora Live USB but I have no idea if I can them to act as HD.

-- Regards
moofang
mshafiq wrote:

I have a question, how to make a usb that will boot Fedora and will act as HD (to save settings/changes, installing/updating software etc...)

I know we can make bootable Fedora Live USB but I have no idea if I can them to act as HD.

Fedora's live USB is persistent, so it will actually save all your configuration/settings/files between boots. Its slower than a standard install though, and I don't think you'd get updates.

You CAN however, simply install a standard Fedora into your usb HDD in the same way you would install it into an internal HDD. Then you'd get everything. I did exactly that Wink
mshafiq
SUB: Fedora as Server is my Choice#1 but Ubuntu CD is powerful

Although I will vote for Fedora if I am going to use (in fact I am using) it as a server.

However I found Ubuntu amazingly powerful.

How?

Once I unzipped a program (I forgot the name now) to see if I can use it as portable software using &-zip and it created some files and folder.
Some files were with no name.

And I was unable to delete them even using killbox or other couple of utilities (that tries to delete them during windows' booting..).

And you know, I booted my laptop with Fedora 7 live cd and it ended up with non fucnctional GUI after some error massages (on a Dell laptop).

I booted with Ubuntu and it it came up successfully.

And I was able to delete the files (which were in fact on NTFS volume)

So It is powerful and access NTFS partition with read/write accessibility.

[I wonder if someday, I'll say YES UBUNTU is good to uise it as SERVER !!! ]

-- Regards
eznet
debsuvra wrote:
For me. Ubuntu Intrepid Ibex is not so good, when Fedora 10 is going to be a rocking release next month.

I am personally diggin 8.10. I did have a bit of issues with it initially due to upgrading to 8.10 from 8.04 via a dist upgrade, but after installing it fresh, it works better for me than Hardy did. One major plus is I notice my notebook is running cooler - less heat and of course, a slower fan... always nice. I decided to move to an encrypted system - dual boot Vista/Ubuntu 8.10... I have Windows encrypted with TrueCrypt and Ubuntu's home with LUKs. So far, so good.
sanalskumar
hack_man_ wrote:
I currently have Windows XP (god help me) and want to change to Linux. I know that Linux is open-source, but does that mean that it is free? I have no idea on the matter so I decided to consult the forums.

EDIT: New question. See topic title

Stickied by Animal - 31 May 06

Praise UBUNTU. Once you register for UBUNTU in the web, they will send the requested number of CDs free of cost. If you are a beginner, ubuntu is the best one for you. It is having the power of Advanced Graphical User Interface and the power of Linux TUI...
mshafiq
Title: HP laptop T5800 is not compatible with Ubuntu* (Linux) Live CD

I bought new HP Pavilion 15.4" Laptop (ie Intel Core 2 Duo Processor T5800 (G50-116CA) from Future Shop (also available at Bestbuy) and tried to boot from latest Ubuntu* (Linux) live CD.

It (CD) had been working everywhere but it did not work on this laptop.
It hanged after the language screen.

Luckily Fedora** CD worked fine for it.

Anyway, still I agree for begginners Ubuntu is a GIFT.

--

Regards

* http://www.ubuntu.com/products/WhatIsUbuntu/desktopedition
* download-able from http://www.ubuntu.com/getubuntu/download

** http://fedoraproject.org/en/get-fedora
albuferque
Since that idea of Mark Shuttleworth about creating a new-brand-improved Debian, everything in the Linux community has become weird. One geek discuss with another one: "My Linux is best" and the other answers: " No, mine is THE BEST". Well, those geeks are seeing the tree, not the forest. I've read a lot of answer like: "Ubuntu sucks" or "Slackware demands you monkey-tasks".
Well the analogy that I can do is:
What's best a STANLEY HAMMER or a BOSCH HAMMER?
No matter what carpenter you ask, the most important is to get the job done.
I mean some distributions have emphasized more on some areas that others.
What we have to do is to choose the correct one for the appropriate job.

Exclamation
welshsteve
Ubuntu is the easiest to use if you're a beginner to Linux (as I am). Computeractive magazine (in the UK) recently published a getting started with Linux magazine (Complete Guide series) and it's full of help in getting started with Linux, focussing mainly on Ubuntu, but it also gives guides on other distros as well.

I did find a distro that looked like Mac OS/X with the icon dock etc but can't remember the name of it now.
chevaliers-citadelle
I am a developper and I couldn't live without Linux.

I use Ubuntu, but there is a lot of others dictribs that are also GREAT!!!

I try Fedora 10 this afternoon, and the graphic theme is Fantastic! The background image is beautyfull!!!

You couldn't find it on windows, it's certain!!!

About the software, it's sure that you can't play at Battlefield or Flight Simulator. It's a shame... Sad
satksri
I have just switched from Vista to Fed 10. A big change. Great OS. But you have to be committed to learning new skills. I am fifty and doing well with Fedora.. sachin
kody
The latest version of linux mint is absolutely amazing. It just works.
eznet
satksri wrote:
I have just switched from Vista to Fed 10. A big change. Great OS. But you have to be committed to learning new skills. I am fifty and doing well with Fedora.. sachin


Yes, you 'hit the nail on the head'. I am happy to hear that you didn't let a 'little learning curve' stop you from using Linux. Many people who become tired of Windows hear the hype of Linux, but fail to realize that they will experience a learning curve similar to the one they experienced when initially learning computers for the first time. Fortunately, and something that I am sure you have figured out by now, is that although there is a learning curve when moving into the Linux world, PC basics are pretty much the same in any OS and so you don't have to start at square ONE like you did when first learning Windows (and PCs).

I know many people who wanted to try Linux, but pretty much as soon as they could not find the "Start button" or Internet Explorer they began their hatred for Linux and demanded to return to Windows. What people must understand is that you will always need to learn some new things when you move to a new OS - its just a fact of life and not a byproduct of Linux being hard or anything.

Just like when you buy a car from another manufacture than the one you learned to drive on, there will be peculiarities and differences that must be adjusted to - the same is true when you use an OS made by someone other than the one you learned to drive on... you will have some learning to do... luckily, you already know how to drive - now you just have to learn where the gas cap release and window washer switches are located...

Happy Linux-ing!!!
phoenixinno
What is the best linux distro?

Im on a laptop
a current vista user
I dont have that much knoeldge of linux
I would like access to common software
it should have a live CD


I might use Ubuntu. Would someone please explain the differences between Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Mythbuntu, Fluxbuntu, etc. Are there major differences and which is the most suitable option.


Cheers Very Happy
Hogwarts
http://www.frihost.com/forums/vt-23576.html
Fire Boar
People will tell you that there is no best distribution. It all depends on the person. So, based on what you've told me (which helps a great deal), I'll tell you which distribution sounds right for you.

You're spot on: Ubuntu sounds like a solid choice that I think you would enjoy - it's not popular among first-timers for no reason you know! Here are the differences between the *buntus:

Mythbuntu is a TV streaming distro, and is probably not what you're after.

Fluxbuntu is an unofficial fork and uses the Fluxbox desktop environment so I wouldn't suggest it for a first timer. Fluxbox is great, but is quite advanced.

That leaves Ubuntu (Gnome), Kubuntu (KDE) and Xubuntu (XFCE). Out of the three, it depends what you're after. Flashy effects, you'll want Ubuntu 8.10, because it's really done a lot with the Gnome desktop environment and supports Compiz effects out of the box (Desktop cube, wobbly windows, fire painting, that sort of thing). For a powerful desktop which you can make however you like, I'd suggest Kubuntu 8.04, (standard edition, not KDE4 remix). It's my personal favourite, is well supported and is extremely powerful. Why the older version? Well, 8.10 uses KDE4.1, which just isn't stable enough to be ready yet. Xubuntu I couldn't really comment on: it uses XFCE which is fairly basic, I hear it's good for low-end systems.

Whatever you do, don't go for something like Ubuntu Ultimate Edition. That's about the most bloated package around (3 different torrent programs, WTF?), and it's pretty unfriendly for the user.

I'm also hearing good things about MEPIS, which is similar to Ubuntu in many ways. Never used it myself, so I'll let others comment on that.

Incidentally, don't be put off by how slow the live CD will seem. That's just because it's running from the CD and not your hard drive, so it won't be as responsive as when it's installed.
AftershockVibe
As a new user I'd suggest you go with some flavour of Ubuntu, since it's simple (although other distros are competitive in this area) but more importantly because it's what every other linux newcomer uses so there's plenty of help and a solid community to help you get around.

Mythbuntu is aimed at using your computer as a PVR to record tv (think Tivo, SkyPlus).
The others are just the default Desktop environment you use.

If you're used to Vista / XP then you'll want KDE or Gnome. Gnome is with standard Ubuntu, KDE with Kubuntu. Look at screenshots to decide what you like, Ubuntu is slightly more polished (being the main distro).

Don't worry about specific Gnome or KDE apps you want to use. You can still install and use them on the other desktop. Also, if you decide you'd like to change to another environment you can easily install it and switch (it doesn't require a reinstall).

Cool
DoctorBeaver
I'm relatively new to Linux and after looking at various distros I settled for Ubuntu 8.04. Installation is very easy; no set-up parameters to worry about apart from the Disk Partitioner which has an auto setting in any case.

I've not had any problems with it although, as to be expected from a newbie, I've needed help finding out how to do certain things. Frihost & Ubuntu forums have been very useful for that.

I would certainly recommend it to any newbie.
welshsteve
I'm very new to Linux and have so far tried the following.

Ubuntu
Xubuntu
Kubuntu
LinuxMint
DSL (Damn Small Linux)
Mandriva Free

I've also tried another one which had a launch bar similar to the MacOSX (like object dock), but I can't remember the name of that one.

At the moment I'd say my favourite is Ubuntu, mainly because I've used it more than the others. I've only used them all in a virtual environment though as I haven't got a spare machine to try them on fully.

I've also very briefly used the Xandros system on the Asus EeePC
Studio Madcrow
My stock answer is, Ubuntu for noobs (not just to Linux but to computers) and openSUSE for powerusers.
Stubru Freak
Studio Madcrow wrote:
My stock answer is, Ubuntu for noobs (not just to Linux but to computers) and openSUSE for powerusers.


I was a Windows power user, and Ubuntu really was the only Linux distribution I managed to use. Windows and Linux are really different, and Ubuntu bridges that gap by being ridiculously easy to use. I'd say that, when you never used a computer before, it's easier to learn than Windows.
Fire Boar
For the regular Desktop user who wants a working desktop out of the box and isn't necessarily interested in the ins and outs of the kernel, compiling stuff or putting up with things not working, it's generally a choice between Fedora, openSUSE and *buntu. The fact that I love the way the apt package manager works swung *buntu in my favour, and Kubuntu because I love the KDE 3 environment.

I'm a fairly accomplished Linux user - epic kernel failures aside, I'm entirely happy with using the terminal and I use it quite often for everyday tasks. I also write BASH scripts frequently (for example, I recently wrote a user-friendly CLI interface for SHOUTCast) to get things done that would normally take hours. Ubuntu is great for me because it brings together a friendly UI that people can just jump right into with the power of Linux underneath. I can show people my computer and after the initial "ZOMG, where's the Start Menu?", I have without fail managed to convince people that you really don't have to be a super-nerd to use Linux. Not that that's convinced many to switch mind you, but it's a start. Smile
steve1200
I don't have the time to read the hole thread so i just tell you me experiences.

I really like Ubuntu Ultimate Edition 2.0 it is based on Ubuntu 8.10. It is about 2Gb big and there is a lot of software with it. Most of the software is for programming and webdesign but there are also a few games and graphic-manipulating programs.
I really love it.
Greets
Steph
welshsteve
The Mac OS/X type distro is DreamLinux. I reall ylike the look of it Smile
mshafiq
Subject: Yes Best Linux is what is best for You

Yes, albuferque is alright

The best is what gives you your desired output.

-- Thanks and Best Regards!!!
weableandbob
I'm not too much of a Linux user, but from what I've seen, Ubuntu is the most user friendly, and will work fine for most people. Things like Fedora are more for people like programmers, although they're perfectly suitable for anybody, just less friendly. It's mostly down to personal preference, as they can pretty much all run the same programs and all.
ajassat
Why did the starter of this thead bother asking. People suggest things which are good for themselves. Your computer usage/level of skill is personal - it's unique to you. Hence he/she should have consulted informative sources such as Wikipedia or Linux distribution sites in order to make the best decision.

By the way, just because something looks good it doesn't mean it's great!
And also, most distributions are fairly similar nowadays. Nearly all major distributions come with a package manager amongst other things.
ajassat
Um...

Why did no one mention Gentoo? Cool
Fire Boar
ajassat wrote:
Um...

Why did no one mention Gentoo? Cool


Because everyone here is a gormless n00buntu, naturally. A distro without an installer would kill most people here. Wink

I'm joking, really. The reason is the OP asked and gave a list which did not include Gentoo. But really, this thread is more than a year old now. Can we please let it die and let the "official" threads deal with the eternal "what Linux is best?" question?
chartcentral
I really like Ubuntu 8.10, which is what I am using right now, so I recommend this for anyone who wants to try Linux out.
MiCKi
for me, SimplyMepis is my best linux that i use.
a lot of function. fully and customizable

don't forgat to visit www.mepis.org
invizibility
I'd say all Linux are the same. You just gotta try all of them at least all the top ones. Checkout distrowatch for the most popular ones. I love Xubuntu, cause its way light on resources and amazing speed. Still I got XP on dual boot Wink (Dont judge me)

I
mshafiq
Quote:
Why did no one mention Gentoo? Cool


We would like to know about Gentoo.
From where to get it and some features
its size?
if live CD exists for it?

-- Regards
Fire Boar
mshafiq wrote:
Quote:
Why did no one mention Gentoo? Cool


We would like to know about Gentoo.
From where to get it and some features
its size?
if live CD exists for it?

-- Regards


http://www.gentoo.org/

Gentoo is a distribution in which you compile everything yourself, and build the system from scratch. I believe in more recent versions there are scripts to automate it, and there's a very comprehensive manual too.

It's extremely efficient since all the packages were build especially for your system. However, the big problem is in the initial setup: it can take several days to compile x.org, for example. It doesn't have a live CD, by the way.
Nolt
The best ?? Debian and Ubuntu two the best Linux ever. Debian was, is and will be the best Smile
abo_mariam
I've tried a lot Linux distributions
but the one i really like was SuSE
welshsteve
I don't use them often enough to give a true answer, but the ones I like are:

Ubuntu
Mandriva
DreamLinux (this one looks like the Mac)
Linux Mint
socialoutcast
ehpc wrote:
Ubuntu is best linux for home use. It's simple, cute and stable. And absolutely free.


Oh great, just what I always wanted, a cute OS. Personally, I like Fedora. It seems that the Fedora/Redhat distros are a little more organized.
5nota
UBUNTU, I had a surprise when I installed it, it recognizes all hardware and open every type of file.
caa-noise
chartcentral wrote:
I really like Ubuntu 8.10, which is what I am using right now, so I recommend this for anyone who wants to try Linux out.


I agree, for the Linux beginers Ubuntu is best, there are modification of Ubuntu - Linux Mint,
Mint have some useful modules, so it is also the choice.
retro-tracker
wich linux version is the best for my home server? i would like run game and voice servers for my own.
vitoR_
I use Ubuntu 8.10 here! Really stable and useful!

It's free also...
yuxuan
i like the redhat.....it is really wonderfui. you can have a try
Twotone
hummm i read all the above post and.......
i'm confused Smile
thinking about installing ubuntu on my laptop it has a AMD Turion64 processor
what version should i try ?
please help can i install a dual boot system with xp Pro?
thanks
samjog
Honestly, with my Fedora 10 and Kde i am omnipotent. Smile
Absolutely happy with that. Though i still have to use windows sometimes, thats why i have dual boot.
babygeek
I think ubuntu is great for new users, especially those who are migrating from windows. very user-friendly, stable, sleek (and can be very lean too, if you make it barebone with install-on-demand programs when you need them). a very gentle intro to linux world, for windows users.
babygeek
to Twotone:

try ubuntu latest version 9.04 (jaunty). I have been running it for some time and it's stable. but then, so are the earlier versions from which I have upgraded from. ubuntu because it is very user-friendly, especially to those who are just starting to migrate to linux. good luck! Smile
Diablosblizz
Bit of a old thread, but I find that KDE would be somewhat similar to the Windows GUI. Basically everything is in the same layout. I personally like Ubuntu (with the gnome). Although, I wish they'd change the brown / orange theme they currently have. I heard something about 9.10 going to fix that, but we'll have to wait and see I guess.
RipperGOD
If you are some business : RHEL!
If you want to use as your desktop : Ubuntu and Fedora.
Rajiev
I'm pretty sure that Ubuntu (or Kubuntu) is the best Linux OS to start with.

I did change from Windows to Linux through Ubuntu and I'm NOT a rocket scientist. So all the others can do the same IMHO Rolling Eyes Very Happy
tiagoeq
Certainly Ubuntu is the best. recognizes all hardware. Like a Windows Vista, hehehe... Razz
Chinmoy
ya, ubuntu is the best linux.
Rajiev
As To the Distrowatch.com, Ubuntu is the most popular GNU/Linux distribution by far

http://distrowatch.com/stats.php?section=popularity

Go and have a look

But wait....
Fedora Is gaining momentum Surprised
xyos
debian based distros are the best for desktop. for server i preffer gentoo linux, archlinux it's cool but it lack in many features that gentoo have.
razum2um
Fire Boar wrote:

Gentoo is a distribution in which you compile everything yourself, and build the system from scratch.

Not fully right. LFS is.

Quote:
However, the big problem is in the initial setup: . It doesn't have a live CD, by the way.

O_O
http://www.gentoo.org/main/en/where.xml
What do you not like?

Quote:
it can take several days to compile x.org, for example

What PC do you have?!
Ful system (base+X+kde4) builds on Core2duo@2.66ghz with 3Gb ram in about 20h
Fire Boar
razum2um wrote:
Fire Boar wrote:

Gentoo is a distribution in which you compile everything yourself, and build the system from scratch.

Not fully right. LFS is.


Well yes. I'm being more general here - you start from one of three stages, and work from there, but in each case you start with almost nothing. Just some tools and an environment to be built and eventually chrooted into. I know the deal.

razum2um wrote:
Quote:
However, the big problem is in the initial setup: . It doesn't have a live CD, by the way.

O_O
http://www.gentoo.org/main/en/where.xml
What do you not like?


At time of posting, or shortly before, no live CD was available.

razum2um wrote:
Quote:
it can take several days to compile x.org, for example

What PC do you have?!
Ful system (base+X+kde4) builds on Core2duo@2.66ghz with 3Gb ram in about 20h
[/quote]

It can take. 20 hours is still a huge amount of time, only 4 hours off a full day: it takes around half an hour, often less, to install an operating system using binaries. Go with a lower spec computer - maybe just over 2GHz single core, 1GB of RAM... you're easily looking at several days of compiling.
razum2um
Quote:
you start from one of three stages

Seems sad, but there is the one (the third) nowadays.
Some from "oldschool" must weep Smile
Quote:
it takes around half an hour, often less, to install an operating system using binaries

Exactly.
I still don't know why I've benn staying on Gentoo about a year already;)
Fire Boar
razum2um wrote:
Quote:
you start from one of three stages

Seems sad, but there is the one (the third) nowadays.
Some from "oldschool" must weep Smile


*weeps* It's just not the same any more...

razum2um wrote:
Quote:
it takes around half an hour, often less, to install an operating system using binaries

Exactly.
I still don't know why I've benn staying on Gentoo about a year already;)


Because of two main things: the bragging rights, and it's customized especially for your computer and your needs.
babygeek
xubuntu seems pretty small and fast. had it installed on a meebius.
weableandbob
Either Ubuntu or Fedora is a good choice. Ubuntu is more user friendly, while Fedora appeals more towards programmers and such.
Rajiev
weableandbob wrote:
Either Ubuntu or Fedora is a good choice. Ubuntu is more user friendly, while Fedora appeals more towards programmers and such.



WEll t, thats a answer i was looking for...

Cos I dont see Y people shoudl choose something else over Ubuntu Surprised
Raymond
I find there is no simple "best" one over all, because they all vary between person to person for the useage they need. I personally use ubuntu, as I am not what people will call "linux savvy", its simple GUI and the software packed in it made me chose it to start off with.

Since then, I have tried several other distributions to see what I like best but I still prefer ubuntu.

Once again, its all a matter of opinion.
Arnie
Rajiev wrote:
Cos I dont see Y people shoudl choose something else over Ubuntu Surprised
Cos not all people are as short-sighted as you are.
dimedrol-tab
I think that the best linux distribution for newbie is ubuntu or gentoo
sourojit
Ya the Operating system is totally free but i think there are some softwares that u may have to pay for,if you use them.
Currently in my knowledge Ubuntu and Kubuntu provides free home delivery,you just have to subscribe on their website.
Few days earlier i tried SABAYON linux .its really cool,it comes with mostly or all softwares of basic needs ,i was surprised to know during installation that it requires 12gb min.
It has a very cool graphical interface u can select gnome,kde,etc.
It's totally free.u can also download it from www.sabayonlinux.org. Though i got ISO image in "chip "magazine if am remembering it properly.
dipesh
We can claim our freedom by opting for free OS as linux is. Open source Softwares are free but not in the sense of money. Free is associated with the freedom it provides as we can distribute it to our loved ones without any license fee,and we have got it's source code so we are free to enhance it according to our needs.
Rafaweb
There are a LOT of distros to select any you want.

You cant say ¿what distro is better? because the better distro for you, maybe dont good for other person.

As an example, some people says Ubuntu is the better, but other people thinks ubuntu is innecesary easy (or charged).
dipesh
ubuntu ultimate is a good one..It has got great aero experience..

One can go for Ubuntu ultimate 2.3 ,which is the latest one !!
PartyPros
I personally swear by Ubuntu Linux. Obviously, its free, and like all versions of linux, it is very stable. Even running off of a live disk, it is very fast and works great.

Any version of linux is great, you just have to find a distribution that is suitable for you! Each version of linux has its ups and downs, and are all good for different things.
pajser
Linux ubuntu is the best.
mshafiq
Hi

I do not know why, but my company use 'Redhat Linux 9' although they update/upgrade everything very oftenly, but they still use RedHat.

Recently they moved from Windows 2000 to RedHat for one of their product although it cost a lot to transform the technology but they have done.

May I assume for commercial application, RedHat is the best and for personal usage Fedora is best and Ubuntu comes after.

-- Thanks
shark123
You can try Ubuntu Wubi, it's like a Windows program. Simply install it from your Windows.
shuust
Ubuntu have a good apt for packets Very Happy
pscompanies
http://lifehacker.com/5170138/five-best-linux-distributions

That ought to help you a bit..
openSUSE, Ubuntu / Debian / Linux Mint, Fedora, Arch Linux, Gentoo..

According to polls, Ubuntu / Debian / Linux Mint is the best.

Which Linux Distribution is Best?
openSUSE 7% (1230 votes)
Ubuntu/Debian/Linux Mint 64% (10901 votes)
Fedora 9% (1557 votes)
Arch Linux 7% (1245 votes)
Gentoo 8% (1290 votes)
Other 5% (816 votes)
Fire Boar
That's a bit biased - Ubuntu and Debian have two completely different audiences despite being technically similar. Linux Mint is a slight oddball, but it's not as if there aren't Fedora/Redhat/OpenSuse based distros as well.
Buba_vv
i have migrated from ubuntu vecause it had very poor support for intel integrated video. Now im Arch user
Rajiev
UBUNTU 9.10 FTW Smile

and Go puppy Linux go.

I'm the newest Fan of Puppy Linux Wink
czarulit
Fire Boar wrote:
That's a bit biased - Ubuntu and Debian have two completely different audiences despite being technically similar.


Yes, but remember ubuntu comes with many applications installed and features configured out of box. Debian-based desktop need to be build from roots (applications, configuration) which causes it's operating system for a bit more experienced users, but if you have a good handbook (eg. gentoo one is really good, but for gentoo not debian Razz) it's not a problem even for a newbie - you just need to read with understanding.

P.S. according to the topic:
I have been using arch linux for a while and I think it's really worth interest.
gandalfthegrey
Ubuntu is by far the easiest to install and manage.

I've tried installing some of the other Linux distros and Ubuntu was the only one that worked. I find it very easy to use.
mshafiq
Wubi - Ubuntu in Windows

By the way I came to know about wubi.
that is like a software that can be installed on a PC without partitioning the existing hard drive. And it will give 'Ubuntu Linux' ...

Here is the link.

http://wubi-installer.org/

[Pardon me if it is an old news. However I came to know wubi today]
Cade
From this what I noticed Opensuse is getting better and better from version to version.

whta I really like about it:
- control panel - Yast
- one click install
- huge repository of software
- Novell version of OpenOffice

Dislikes:
- form version 11.2 SMART seems to be paid less attention due to the zypper development
- some tolls like ntfs-config need root password
Rajiev
Everyone can have a debate on what is the best Distro.
But you cant do it for the most popular Distro

Cos Ubuntu Linux is way ahead of others.
Acording tothe http://distrowatch.com/ Ubuntu has far more hits than any other (out of thousands) Distro
kutekitten
There is no such thing as "best". There are so many different uses for a computer and so many different people that having just one version would never make so many people happy. There are different distros for different needs. Newer users are better off with something like ubuntu, but may change over time when they get more used to the system. There are hundreds, which shows how diverse it really is.

This is something I don't like about windows, you have to deal with what they give you, there are no other choices, and if their current one doesn't suit you, too bad. I hate knowing that I spent years paying for that.
Rajiev
kutekitten wrote:
There is no such thing as "best". There are so many different uses for a computer and so many different people that having just one version would never make so many people happy. There are different distros for different needs. Newer users are better off with something like ubuntu, but may change over time when they get more used to the system. There are hundreds, which shows how diverse it really is.

This is something I don't like about windows, you have to deal with what they give you, there are no other choices, and if their current one doesn't suit you, too bad. I hate knowing that I spent years paying for that.


Amen, Thats so true.
Technology (or any tool) is as good as it's user Very Happy
Iguleder
There is no "best" distro, it's a matter of taste and preference. I use multiple distributions myself and working on my very own distro too.

I use Arch as my main desktop, with KDE, Puppy for experiments and some web development, Debian for web development and my old PC and Parted Magic for partitioning. Each has its own advantages and disadvantages.

I'm also working on a mini-distro for my old PC, made from scratch, totally independent.
quoc1
I think opensuse is easy to use and stable.
taytay
The easiest linux I have EVER installed would have to be Ubuntu. Installing from windows anyway. You download a file from their website that's not even 10Megs big I believe. Run the file, select a few settings and it does all the work for you from there. Reboot your computer and Tada!-You have windows And linux on your computer!

now, getting your computer to use Microsoft's version of the program that lets you choose which OS to boot into, other than using the Linux's version... That's different. I managed it, but dang it I shoulda made a tutorial! I need to just log everything I ever do.. I figure out a lot of things that others either didn't know how to do, or explained how-to, poorly. lol
Fire Boar
taytay wrote:
now, getting your computer to use Microsoft's version of the program that lets you choose which OS to boot into, other than using the Linux's version... That's different. I managed it, but dang it I shoulda made a tutorial! I need to just log everything I ever do.. I figure out a lot of things that others either didn't know how to do, or explained how-to, poorly. lol


Haha, why would you want to do that? Grub is far superior to ntldr, you can even have a background image. Smile Plus you get a shell if, worst comes to worst, you messed up the configuration and the operating system won't boot at all. Besides, the reason it's difficult is because ntldr doesn't support Linux. After all, Microsoft doesn't want to make it easy to use non-Windows operating systems, that would be bad for business.
ganjour
I think these Linux distribution is too much, and a dog and a cat make them, and the sense has not enough
5aia
i think ubuntu is the best because it is very user friendly and similar to windows
gdn17
For me Ubuntu is the best
Peterssidan
There are a lot of distributions I have never tested but my experience is that Ubuntu is easy to use but you learn very little using it. Ubuntu is also very slow to update their packages so you can be left with years old versions. Arch Linux on the contrary is a little harder to get right but you actually learn something and the packages are updated very often (sometimes too often because they can contain obvious bugs).
If I have to pick one distribution I pick Arch Linux (use it for my laptop) but I still use Ubuntu 8.04 on my desktop computer because I don't want to reinstall the OS. It's not a huge difference in the end.
Pengeszikra
I'm also choice Ubuntu on my old Tablet PC - LG LT20 - because i'm lost Windows Tablet PC edition keys.
Unfortunately linux is don't have right program to develop flash content. Only the flex SDK mxmlc compiler work. But that is don't really good for make visual content.

Good point - in my view - ubuntu linux is immediately recognize my tablet PC element. Even the wacom screen too. GIMP can use pen pressure sensitive, after install wacom driver.
addife
The Ubuntu is the easy one, but Gentoo and Slackware, in my opnion, are the fastest one. Debian is very complete too. But, for home useres, I recommend Ubuntu.
Rajiev
A few of my friends complained that the Ubuntu is getting slower day by day???
Is it true?
Fire Boar
Rajiev wrote:
A few of my friends complained that the Ubuntu is getting slower day by day???
Is it true?


It used to be. But ubuntu has become a lot faster over the past three releases.
Radar
Wishing I could help with this discussion, but sadly I've yet to set up a working copy of Linux. One day. Until then, my experience will probably remain restricted to work and similar activities.

Having said all of that - I will put my vote in for Ubuntu though. Fedora is nice as well.
Asafe
MS Ubuntu.
ProwerBot
I'm running Ubuntu. It's alright but it doesn't seem to like my graphics memory or something because it crashes sometimes. I'm too lazy to find the right drivers for it.
LostOverThere
Asafe wrote:
MS Ubuntu.

Wait what. Laughing
Rajiev
LostOverThere wrote:
Asafe wrote:
MS Ubuntu.

Wait what. Laughing


lolz,
I thought Only i was confused Laughing
zenama
Peterssidan wrote:
There are a lot of distributions I have never tested but my experience is that Ubuntu is easy to use but you learn very little using it. Ubuntu is also very slow to update their packages so you can be left with years old versions. Arch Linux on the contrary is a little harder to get right but you actually learn something and the packages are updated very often (sometimes too often because they can contain obvious bugs).
If I have to pick one distribution I pick Arch Linux (use it for my laptop) but I still use Ubuntu 8.04 on my desktop computer because I don't want to reinstall the OS. It's not a huge difference in the end.


It seems Ubuntu releases a new version of the operationg system each 6 months. So the remark about the slow update is not very well understood. The other question is why it is hard to get Linux Arch. Somebody who is interested in getting Linux Arch might like to try this website. It provides a link to the website of Arch Linux with links to download a free copy of Arch Linux.

http://donja.0fees.net/index.html
ongdesign
I use ubuntu 10.04. now they have 10.10. I would say Ubuntu 10 is the best, user friendly.
Rajiev
ongdesign wrote:
I use ubuntu 10.04. now they have 10.10. I would say Ubuntu 10 is the best, user friendly.


Ithink The startup screen can use a bit more hype Smile
qaziu
Small distros: Puppy, Damn Small Linux (DSL), Slax ...
perfect to safely check your bank account
(even on virtual machine ... under XP -> Long live M$! Laughing)

Ubuntu is still heavy for me ...
LostOverThere
Quote:
Small distros: Puppy, Damn Small Linux (DSL), Slax ...

Man, I need to try Slax again. I haven't used it in years, although I always felt it had loads of potential.
ankur209
UBUNTU is the best ever i've used...!! Razz
hamilton
I think better distribution of the laptop is openSUSE, one of the main contenders for victory on the desktop. Laptop, SUSE Linux shines with great connectivity tools, such as easy access to networking tools that not only manages WiFi connections, but also a CDMA cellular modem connections.
will22
Crunchbang is currently my favorite. The Openbox WM keeps me from having to deal with icons on my Desktop, and pushes me to use the terminal more, which is always a good thing!
Rajiev
will22 wrote:
Crunchbang is currently my favorite. The Openbox WM keeps me from having to deal with icons on my Desktop, and pushes me to use the terminal more, which is always a good thing!


Surprised
Pengeszikra
Some one is known the android commands list.

That is interest operating system based on linux kernel.
After rooting my phone I can use terminal program to control. But example ssh is still missing.

[/u]
mahirh
so , isn mac one , atleast its based on unix even though they had a very stupid financiers
but i use windows and i recommend ubuntu or fedora
Cheeldash
I tried Ubuntu, ArchLinux and Debian.
Ubuntu it was nice as start, but when i got used to GNU/Linux i found was not for me. It has a great compatibility, it's easy and has a lot of tutorials, it's the best for beginners and normal users.

ArchLinux was fun! I didn't knew much about Linux because i had experience only with Ubuntu when i installed it. It took me 3 days for getting the internet working, my mistake on configurating it, and then it was fun to install all those packages and making the things working correctly, but then i got bored and passed to Debian, which i use today. It's a very good distro, though repositories of the stable are not updated often, this can bring to some problems, for example if i'm correct pidgin and emesene versions in stable repos are old and cannot connect to hotmail, you have to use backports or install by hand the updated versions.
zacharygriver
Knoppix is pretty shitty, in my humble opinion, I really start advice do Mandriva. When it comes to functionality, it is more like windows, so it is easy to get into linux quickly without getting stuck at the installation.
Calebskillen
I really like Ubuntu Ultimate Edition 2.0 is based on Ubuntu 8.10. It is 2 GB and there are many great software with it. Most software is for design and web programming, but there are also some games and handling graphics programs.
jarmush
I use Debian at my laptop. There is minimal installation: Debian netinstall, X, openbox, opera
gs-resume
I like the Ubuntu distros. Good hardware support and quite easy to setup. Plus the base distro is still relatively small i snsize compared to other distros. Also has good support forums.
maicoprince
I use Arch as my main desktop with KDE, Puppy for experiments, and some web development, web development and Debian for my old PC and Parted Magic partitioning.
probna
what is the main difference between ubuntu for desktop, and ubuntu for notebooks?
mugundhan
hack_man_ wrote:
I currently have Windows XP (god help me) and want to change to Linux. I know that Linux is open-source, but does that mean that it is free? I have no idea on the matter so I decided to consult the forums.

EDIT: New question. See topic title

Stickied by Animal - 31 May 06

ubuntu is good for normal use .
fedora for developers
back track for security experts
red hat for company purpose
han007
hi
opensese is nice but macro$oft Very Happy bought it...!!!
find new distro?
CheDragon
I like Ubuntu for normal users.
I like Debian in my laptop
I like any distro as long as they DO NOT use KDE
pyrecon
Ubuntu for swapping from Windows to Linux I guess, since Ubuntu is really working on it and it is doing its job well Very Happy

and Ubuntu is also great for home users as it's easy to use and maintain so I'd recommend it.
iman
Open source is more than free.
Also ubuntu's pretty well-developed now, it's now more user-friendly, and the UI is great.
LostOverThere
CheDragon wrote:
I like Ubuntu for normal users.
I like Debian in my laptop
I like any distro as long as they DO NOT use KDE

Interesting, I personally use Ubuntu on my laptop.

What do you think is wrong with KDE? Granted, I haven't permanently used it since 3.5, as I've only tried 4.0 a couple of times (although it wasn't really my cup of tea).
Fire Boar
KDE 4.0 was a disaster, but it has been getting steadily better over time. The current version is quite solid, and looks nice too.
cybersa
Ubuntu is best.
glink
Ubuntu is the best distro, but now with Unity as defoult it let me down...

i read somewere that is is not going to give you the normal gnome look to choose from is that tru?

and i'm using the elementary distro, that is based on ubuntu, its nice and i recommend it to you.
ProwerBot
Ubuntu studio is pretty good. Basically, it's just ubuntu with more multimedia applications and creative programs pre-installed. I have it on my desktop and it works like a charm. I also have regular ubuntu on my desktop, and it works very good aswell.
chartcentral
I'm excited for the upcoming release of Ubuntu 11.04! Smile
hassane
Ubuntu can be good for you, it's simple easy to use.
Naldo
Ubuntu with gnome.
Unity is no good, just a desktop with a dock on the left.
Lets wait for Unity updates, today it makes no sense(for me).
enriqueansotegui
stoy teniendo problemas con los ftp de los hosting gratuitos.
Si en realidad es una chantada porque ponene esos host gratuitos?
A mi me parece que deberían hacer algo y eliminarlos de la red porque ocupan espacio al pedo y alfinal no hacen nada bueno por la cumuniad.

Estoy a ver si voy y vengo por a´hí y nada.

Bueno amigos les dejo un regan saludo.
Chauchles.
billymeter
I don't think there really is a "best" overall distro. Some distros are aimed at different tasks. Some are meant to be servers, others for desktops, others for multimedia creation, etc. I personally use Ubuntu though.
Blastr
I like Linux Mint. Why? It is as easy as Ubuntu (very important for a Linux-noob like me Wink ) and it is available with my favorite window manager LXDE. Very Happy
Known
If your new to Linux then I'd suggest Ubuntu or Linux Mint as they are both stable, and very easy to use distros. I however use openSUSE and I would say that it is a very easy to use and mess around with distro aswell. If your looking for the whole "Windows Vista/7" feel then I would recommend getting a KDE Desktop based .iso of the distro you would like.
plantsandfishes
there are 1100 million personal computers with Windows,
60 million with OS X
and 30 million with Linux


Linux go ahead!
thrust
Does anyone use Slackware on desktop?
Adiiforu
I dont know whats best but i use ubuntu its easy
mazito
i am away from Linux since 3 years, but lasta year i try the UBUNTU, and i was very surprised with it, my vote is for UBUNTU

in the past i used

RED HAT, Slakware, SUSE (i like it), LINEX a Linux Debian Based Spanish distribution suported by the Goverment of Extremadura Spain
LostOverThere
thrust wrote:
Does anyone use Slackware on desktop?

Heh, I used to have it on my incredibly old desktop box from c. 1995. Man, that was an experience and a half.
CraigHF
I personaly use Ubuntu 11.04, but I use it in classic mode since I really hate the feel of Unity Sad
Mint is another good way to go imo.

I also plan to try BackTrack (security oriented distro)... I'll post back to send my appreciation!
Bad_Dogz
Once an operating system is open source, it is free to the public and as for the best Linux OS, I would recommend using Ubuntu which has a very user friendly interfaced a provides sufficient operating speed.
MrTylerGreen
By far this is the smartest thing to do:

If you have NO experience with linux, choose Ubuntu. It is not as customizable, fast, or really better in any way to other linux distros except in the easy of setup. Note that I don't say hardware compatibility as most hardcore ubuntu fans will say because if it is supported in Ubuntu, it is supported in other linux distros, it is just a matter of how hard it is to get it working.

Get a feel for Ubuntu, then move on to something harder, but still pretty easy like Arch, then maybe play with Gentoo.A good way to do this is to get a working Ubuntu install going, then get some sort of virtualization software and play with virtual machines of other distros.
Schyllic
Hi there. I have been a Linux user since inception. I remember using Slackware in 1995. I used Vector Linux for a while. When Ubuntu came out I switched to that and kept up with the upgrades more or less UNTIL the last upgrade which totally blows for an experienced Linux user. <rant> I have refused the upgrade and plan to stay with Ubuntu 10.10 running Gnome 2.32.0 as long as I can. The newer designs drive me absolutely bonkers. A menu that forces you to type, really? What the hell is the point of the menu, then? Just use a command line with command completion, already (e.g. fish). I have a friend (not an experienced Linux user) and she had the same reaction. I'm really confused exactly what kind of users prefer the new Unity and Gnome designs. Personally I think it's an extremely small set. People who just started using computers with Windows Vista, I suppose. Granted I spent a total of about 10 seconds in the new layout. That's about how long it took me to inhale, choke, and puke it out. </rant>

So yeah. Ubuntu 10.10. Hope the info helps someone!
http://releases.ubuntu.com/10.10/

peace
anthonythangaraj
Mandriva is the Linux i am using currently. I already tried most of the linux distribution. But now sticking to Mandriva linux. Its One of the best linux. And all have to try it Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy
narashiman
I would tell u to use Linux MINT 12 , Kubuntu or Debian
Marcuzzo
Debian kicks ass.

Slackware is one of the oldest linux distros and also one of my favorites
I used to run on slackware but I got tired of having to compile everything and to make sure that the correct dependencies are available and the whole yadayada.
now I use debian and installing software is easy, apt-get install .... and there you go.

IMO all the other debian based distro's are lame, there's ubuntu which is debian based, then there is mint linux which is ubuntu based
what's next... a linux mint based distro? Laughing
next year I think will look into LFS If I have the time....

another thing. you don't need to use the default desktop environment or even window manager of your distro.
if you don't like KDE ( like me ) then don't use it, you can install several desktop environments at once.
when I first started out with linux I had all of them installed, Gnome, KDE, Xfce and fluxbox.
and when loggin in I could select the one I wanted to use.

same for window managers. nowadays I use Compiz because I like the wobbly windows Very Happy
LostOverThere
narashiman wrote:
I would tell u to use Linux MINT 12 , Kubuntu or Debian

That depends, what desktop environment are you interested in using? If you want Gnome 3 (but in a more traditional sense) I'd recommend the latest version of Linux Mint. If you prefer KDE, go with Kubuntu. The latest stable release of Debian currently utilises Gnome 2.

With that being said though, as I'm sure you know, it's incredibly easy to switch desktop environments, so don't think you're going to be too tied down by your decision.
Hexes
My favorite distro is Arch because of his incredible package manager - pacman.
Before I used to be a Debian user but after two years of rolling my system went down because of package manager.
Then I thought that I should find something new and it was a great decision. Arch is just awesome in many aspects not only package manager. It has one of the best wiki's out there so even beginners could lay their hands on it. It's a bit hard at the beginning - all those text files with settings, lack of gui etc. but after few month you can't even imagine your life without it.
If you are complete beginner to linux my advice would be to install Arch Bang - it's preconfigured Arch with some popular apps installed. It works out of the box so for beginners it is a great advantage. If you have an old hardware then Arch is a must for you!
pazis
I prefer Ubuntu 10.4 among all others. However you may like Mint, Cent OS, and Fedora...
mml_
My suggestion is Ubuntu if you are complete beginner. I think it is the best for that. For more advanced users it is probably Fedora as it is more customizable.
all the best with your search!
rodexa
openSUSE in my opinion a good linux distribution. I use it for several years and can definitely recommend it.
sysna
I think Ubuntu is the best distribution, it is getting more and more powerful everyday and recently they are working on some power saving features to give notebook users a good operating system too. by the way i found that Linux Mint is completely an Ubuntu with a lot better default multimedia capability. so currently i'm using Linux Mint but i don't think we can call it a different distro , it is ubuntu with different style Very Happy .
LostOverThere
sysna wrote:
by the way i found that Linux Mint is completely an Ubuntu with a lot better default multimedia capability. so currently i'm using Linux Mint but i don't think we can call it a different distro , it is ubuntu with different style Very Happy .

Perhaps, but by that logic Ubuntu is just Debian with a "different style."

Linux Mint is its own distro, despite how similar it may be to Ubuntu.
Exterminus
Ubutun-BR
Chellesei
Well, for me, I'll vote for Ubuntu or Kubuntu. I'm currently using Kubuntu 11.10 and used Ubuntu 11.04 before and I liked both. I just liked Kubuntu more because of its desktop effects and it's default is blue. lol. Mr. Green
gzroff
A good distro to start out with is Ubuntu, its by far the most user friendly distro out there. It's very easy to setup and to learn to use. I personally find it to be the best alternative to windows.
LostOverThere
Exterminus wrote:
Ubutun-BR

I'm not sure I'm familiar with this distro...
jurl
Ubuntu 10.10 is my distro.

and for KDE users - kubuntu is pretty cool Smile
Anatisim
I would have to say Ubuntu. I started out with OpenSuse but support, documentation and help just wasn't as readily available as for Ubuntu. Install is flawless. Easiest way to install is to download the .iso in your flavor, burn to disk and install. Easier way to install is on a thumbdrive by using Muli-system (unfortunately, would have to have linux already installed to install it on your thumbdrive). Fortunately there are alternatives out there to install OS's via your thumbdrive.
shyingboy
Hi! I'm a new Linux user yet.
Often, Linux operating system, like Fedora, Ubuntu and so on, means that the system and all software attached with it are free and open source, which benefits people life. There are thousands kinds of open source software provided by individuals, fan teams, companies, foundations and the quantity is growing fast.
The above is usually free.

But software providers offer you other choices.
Red Hat is a famous operating system based on Linux, but it requires you to pay for it and its service.
Also, some applications are non-free.

For newer, Ubuntu is good choice. It has a brilliant desktop and large number of user, which can help you a lot when you deal with problems.

By the way, Linux based operating system is more dependent on command, which is far away from Windows, so I hope you can learn some common command before you change to Linux.

Good luck! I hope you will enjoy you Linux tour. Very Happy
stblack
Hi!
I am using and contributing to Mageia https://www.mageia.org/en/2/, the distro that is a fork of Mandriva.
I believe that is a good distro and the people that are working on it are very professional.
All updates are tested before final push to end users and we are doing our best to do it as best as we can.
Mageia currently ranks #2 on http://distrowatch.com.

Stblack
sawdclan
Open-source means it's free and you can just edit it's code and just give it away over the internet.
It just means you're free to decide what you are going to do with a code or software.
You can do (almost) everything without having any law issues.
Windows is not open source at al; microsoft ownes it and only THEY can decide what happens with it.With Linux everyone just helps each other by spreading the code or improving the software and spread that. Nobody ownes open-source projects
Peterssidan
sawdclan wrote:
Nobody ownes open-source projects

I think they do. Sun owns Open Office. Mozilla owns Firefox. There will always be someone(s) who has the final word. If we don't like it we can always fork the project.
sawdclan
Peterssidan wrote:
sawdclan wrote:
Nobody ownes open-source projects

I think they do. Sun owns Open Office. Mozilla owns Firefox. There will always be someone(s) who has the final word. If we don't like it we can always fork the project.


You've got a point, but it's the idea everybody just does what they want and they can realease it under any name without, for example, mozilla saying it's their thing. I might now getting a noobie look, I have to tell I don't know what it EXACTLY is
darthrevan
It is all a matter of choice. I use to hate this reply when I was in this position, but it is true. You need to decide your level of knowledge of Linux, how much you want it to hold your hand, and probably lastly how much control you want.

For example for beginners, the choices would be something like:
Mandriva, Ubuntu, Fedora and others based on these.

For intermediate/advanced users:
Gentoo, Debian, Slackware.

There was a site that would help you find the distro that matches your answers to questions it asked.
subhan1
Linux is awesome - I really liked the environment - Ubuntu will be amazing for a new Linux User or a beginner Smile
honken
I agree with what people say, Ubuntu is a good system if you never tried or want to try Linux, its has a flavour of its own, that makes it easy to understand.

I remember when i started with linux, then it was like Redhat 5 or something like that.
A friend came over and cleaned my computer out and installed it, i was clueless for a long time, then i went back to windows.

But then i decided to try it again, so i got my self a secondary computer and had it dedicated with a linux installation, and this time o it was Mandrake.

Then when i got more comfortable i whent over to Debian (because of its apt-get and deb files).
And at some point i change to Slackware (not recommended for beginners).

Time went on, now days for me, i favour OpenBSD and Gentoo Linux, thou gentoo is a pain in the a** to install, since you need to do it all by your self (not sure now, been like 2 years since i ran it), but partition tables and everything you had to create your self.

Today, i not that picky, but i use my Mac at home, and windows at work, but i do play around with OpenBSD, Gentoo and debian time from time when i need to try some scripts and so on (mainly Shellscript).

I like linux/bsd/mac/win, since they all have their specialized things they are good at, and bad at Smile

You all remember BeOS? that was/is a very nice system Smile
jajarvin
My favorite is Ubuntu. It works fine on every PC. It is easy to install ans it keep itself updated via Internet.
milkshake01
I think Ubuntu is the best. It is also the most popular.
zaxacongrejo
backtrack is the best
mahirh
jajarvin wrote:
My favorite is Ubuntu. It works fine on every PC. It is easy to install ans it keep itself updated via Internet.

Ubuntu WAS a great linux based OS. Too bad they are now busy copying Macintosh and making money.And lately, it has gotten damn too "mobile UI" for a desktop OS. 9.10 was the last real Ubuntu release. Ubuntu has now lost its true essence. When i started with ubuntu, i did so because it was easily customizable and not because of the looks. But in the latest versions, the interface suggests otherwise. It has been time for them to stop thinking of money and accept that there is no money to be made in linux just because the users think so.
JasonNewman
I use Xubuntu on my spare laptop. Works very well and it screams with only 1gb of ram! Ubuntu is great too, the only reason (literally) I use Xubuntu rather than Ubuntu is because it has a cooler name. Other than that they're like the same.
codersfriend
I think Kubuntu is great. You can customize your desktop
Arrogant
All linux distributions are great as they are free and open source software
But i prefer UBuntu for desktop and server distribution.
D'Artagnan
kubuntu and centos for me
Arrogant
I want to turn to linux..
So which is better distribution of linux??
Is Ubuntu a better choice for a newbie?
sctr
The regular ubuntu is fine for a beginner. if your system is slow, or you want something more learn, xubuntu will offer the same ease of setup but isn't as resource intensive as the latest Gnome that comes with ubuntu. It also works a bit more like previous versions. That interface that they switched over to for Gnome is just terrible.
dano
Your probably best to go with anything -buntu.
I myself prefer Xubuntu but have used Linux mint occasionally as well.
manverupl
I use Ubuntu somtimes and i can recomend it.
bogisha
Depends on user, for beginners and people who want to have all features after installation i recommend Ubuntu or Linux Mint, and for people who want to tweak a little to make system have exactly what they want to have i recommend Fedora, and for hardcore linux users i recommend Arch.

There are one little thing called Porteus which run from USB stick, i made perfect portable web developing workstation with it. It is free and only 200MB so give it a try.
davorin
Which Linox distribution is the best for developing in Python?
crazyfffan
It depends on your needs, but the Ubuntu series may suffice. I'm not talking about Ubuntu alone, there are Kubuntu with KDE, Edubuntu for education, and a lot me Xbuntu for different purposes.
kulucamac
Debian, Ubuntu and Pardus Very Happy
iodus
For me, i will go for Ubuntu, because it is very good maintained by the developers.
And he have LTS (Long time support).
We are using it in production environment, and except some little thinks, Ubuntu is one of the best.
IceCreamTruck
This thread really needs a poll.
Cruxader
I haven't read all 6 thousand posts above, so I'm probably going to repeat something someone has already stated:

It depends.

If you are running ancient hardware, try Puppy Linux. My ancient T23 IBM Thinkpad runs great with this. You can actually run Puppy right off a USB stick or DVD and it's extremely fast. No hard drive needed.

If you are running modern hardware and are a Linux novice, try Linux Mint (Ubuntu is good too).

If you are running modern hardware, want total unfettered control, and aren't afraid of a command line, try Arch Linux.

Honestly though, Linux Mint is a great distro and pretty much works "right out of the box".

*Technically you don't need a hard drive for any Linux distro, but smaller distros work better off of USB sticks or DVDs than the bigger ones.
davorin
I need Linux for beginners?
IceCreamTruck
davorin wrote:
I need Linux for beginners?


Install linux (ubuntu for instance) to a flash drive, and go into your computer bios and set usb/removable media as an early boot option (before your hard drive with the regular os on it).

You can then boot from a flash drive and play around with distros until you find one you like, or is compatible with your system and runs well. Next you can work on dual booting windows and the flavor of linux that you've chosen.

I usually go with KDE installed on ubuntu, but to each his own in the linux world. You may like "mint" or "gnome" or one of tons of different linux flavors.
davorin
Ok. Thank you for your response.
xmcorporation
bogisha wrote:
Depends on user, for beginners and people who want to have all features after installation i recommend Ubuntu or Linux Mint, and for people who want to tweak a little to make system have exactly what they want to have i recommend Fedora, and for hardcore linux users i recommend Arch.

There are one little thing called Porteus which run from USB stick, i made perfect portable web developing workstation with it. It is free and only 200MB so give it a try.


UAU thanks for Linux Porteus, I've been looking for something like this, till then I only ran Mint from USB with persistence, but I definetly try this.

I also agree with Linux Mint, I switched from Windows XP to the Mint XFCE edition, it's really fast, and shutsdown in 3 secs. So this is the distro to choose coming from windows.

The beauty in this is that you can choose different desktop enviroments to suit your needs, try CINNAMON, MATE and XFCE to see what you like best.

Personnaly I'm going more and more minimalistic each day
vixxxxx
hack_man_ wrote:
I currently have Windows XP (god help me) and want to change to Linux. I know that Linux is open-source, but does that mean that it is free? I have no idea on the matter so I decided to consult the forums.

EDIT: New question. See topic title

Stickied by Animal - 31 May 06

so far linuxmint is still the king of the distro
panolga
It depends on what you want. I found Ubuntu has got the best forum support and is most comfortable to use. It is easy to install new application on it, and for this operating system you will find versions of the most popular free programs without a headache (Skype, Dropbox, etc). It also has a good probability that you will not have a problem with a WLAN connection on your laptop (if you’re using a laptop).
In the case your computer is old and feeble better try Puppy Linux
http://www.puppylinux.com/
I like it. It is installed on a memory stick and you can use it, in addition, with another OS. Very easy to test! It takes very little space – a 1 Gb memory stick is sufficient.
However to use Windows or Linux are two completely different things. You should learn a lot! This is the price you pay for free Linux!
siaswar
I tested a lot of Linux distributions and I came from windows. there are a lot of thing made a distribution suitable for someone. I think Ubuntu with gome3 desktop is the best, but it must be Ubuntu-gnome distribution. But somehow windows users prefer KDE desktop and this made Kubuntu a better choice.
Installing Ubuntu and then installing KDE or Gnome is not a good thing. using Ubuntu-genom or Kubuntu is better.
Notice: all distributions are good and it's matter of user taste and getting familiar with it.
codegeek
I like Ubuntu 13.04. On my friend's computer, it's running beautifully. Even the internet seems to be faster on Ubuntu than on Windows. I also love the Ubuntu software center where you can find and download most softwares. For programmers, I think Ubuntu is a very nice OS to use.
ceppeRaz
Hum, linux flavour is very personal, the only thing to do is to install a few and try them out. Useful could be to run "Virtualbox" and try them out. This way you will get info about the flaour from first hand.
loveandormoney
This is right. Linux is very special. So I tried 20 LIVE CDs on different computers
and some Linux like this machine but not the other machine. So the best way is
to try out
what You like
and what Your hardware like.
UltimateCoder
hack_man_ wrote:
I currently have Windows XP (god help me) and want to change to Linux. I know that Linux is open-source, but does that mean that it is free? I have no idea on the matter so I decided to consult the forums.

EDIT: New question. See topic title

Stickied by Animal - 31 May 06


This question depends on a number of factors such as: Which type of user you are?, Which type of Work you do?, You are a noob or geek???


For example, for a New Linux user, I wii not recommend BackTrack , will you?Very Happy If you are a starter, try playing with Ubuntu but dont go for GUI....want to grow up then go for CLI......If you want to Pentesting, Reverse Engineering etc then go for Kali Linux....
MrBrumm
What i did was try a few. Just installed them, checked what worked out of the box (without manually installing drivers), and had a quick look around to get a feel for the menu system. Did this with i think eight different distributions, and chose the one I felt best about. It took a while installing all these times, but with all the options for linux distributions, everybody seem to have a different opinion on what is the best. Obviously the support community can also make a big difference, but with most of the popular distributions, you can get help so solve most issues in a few days.
dxverm
I have to say my personal favorite Linux distribution is Backtrack 5. It offers great networking tools as well as works perfectly fine for normal tasks and functions.
Possum
I hear great things about http://elementaryos.org/
gediminas
What gadget you using in Windows 8.1
aayushsrivastava14
Ubuntu has best UI. But overall, I find Fedora as best. Puppy linux is also an interesting distro.
Marcuzzo
aayushsrivastava14 wrote:
Ubuntu has best UI. But overall, I find Fedora as best. Puppy linux is also an interesting distro.

How can you like Ubuntu for it's UI? IMO, and sorry for being so direct, The only reason why ubuntu is great is that they are Debian based.

I'll choose Gnome over any other desktop environment.

Are you talking about the Unity Shell for Gnome...? the one that sends your search strings to Canonical?
aayushsrivastava14
Ubuntu and Linux Mint for usual stuff. Also try Fedora, its worth it. If you are into gaming please try Puppy Linux Arcade.
darthrevan
I went by and tried Fedora, but moved away from it; but still maintain a couple of packages there. Also have dwb packaged on Debian. Aparently Arch is mine, no other distro can keep me it seems, Also using the btrfs file system, sure will be glad once it becomes stable.
Peterssidan
I have moved away from using Arch Linux. It was great and you learn a lot but it got a bit tiresome that a simple upgrade could make things stop working. Now I have started to use Debian instead. It's more stable and they take free software seriously.
loveandormoney
bogisha wrote:
Depends on user, for beginners and people who want to have all features after installation i recommend Ubuntu or Linux Mint, and for people who want to tweak a little to make system have exactly what they want to have i recommend Fedora, and for hardcore linux users i recommend Arch.

There are one little thing called Porteus which run from USB stick, i made perfect portable web developing workstation with it. It is free and only 200MB so give it a try.


Is this right:

Gentoo is the best Linux for professionals.

Why Gentoo is so good?
PBMaxx
For general, everyday use, CrunchBang Linux.

For customizing, LinuxBBQ with siduction kernel.

Still testing others so I can settle on one if I don't stay with one of the above distros.
tamilparks
ubuntu
Peterssidan
tamilparks wrote:
ubuntu

Have you tried something else?
rajdon82
hack_man_ wrote:
I currently have Windows XP (god help me) and want to change to Linux. I know that Linux is open-source, but does that mean that it is free? I have no idea on the matter so I decided to consult the forums.

EDIT: New question. See topic title

Stickied by Animal - 31 May 06


EOS is the best Linux distro. Linux Mint has become so slow, you will need an Alienware Computer to run it. Perhaps you should try Windows 8.1. Its the Best OS ever built.
ephedrandrox
I have used many Linux distributions over the years starting with slackware in 1996. Trying SUSE, debian, and Mandrake linux early on, I preferred Mandrake as a desktop. Until I install ppc Linux on my mac clone. The hardware was superior to my x86 machines. I used Slackware on a 386 to feed and share my 28.8k modem connection to my growing network of acquired hardware.

Since then, many things have progressed and I have tried different distros as they came and went. I never really liked the debian based distros and because of that don't enjoy the ubuntu experience. I did like the Gentoo system and it's portage system similar to the BSD I was exploring around the same time. Both of which I would prefer as server systems though I did set up and use Gentoo a couple times as workstations.

I have currently settled on CentOS as a solid distribution. Both stable and efficient, it is professional and enterprise based. I run CentOS 6 on my older hardware that isn't supported by version 7. I run CentOS 7 on my laptop which has become my main computer. They both have a solid desktop environment and hardware support with minimal configuration though version 7 is more demanding with the Gnome3 shell. I still think it runs better then Ubuntu and is a good way to learn RedHat Linux if you want to do that for a job or something.

But that is just my style and what runs well on my hardware, I suggest you try as many distros as you can and decide what works best for you.
deanhills
Great to hear you're on CentOS Ephe. This is my first Linux experience after someone gave me a VPS as a gift for Christmas. Provided me with an opportunity I've been looking for for a long time to get to grips with a little bit of Linux. So call me a complete novice and basically Linux illiterate.

I use CentOS from a Windows environment. With PuTTY. Works well. Got a few commands under the belt as well am enjoying Yum and Vi. BUT, still yearning for a control panel for my websites. Think when I have some time tomorrow I'll document some of my experiences in my blog. Been keeping me very busy for the last three weeks.
jaeha
For the Enterprise and company, Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL)

For the Personal Computer, Ubuntu.

RHEL is not free and fully supported just like other major UNIX like AIX or HPUX. A lot of company using the Linux in business seriously, including running main database. Web hosting on Linux is already dominated and no competitors.

Ubuntu is based on Debian, but it has much better User Interface and packaging management. There is nothing you cannot do if Windows can. Unlike other Linux distribution, a lot of things are done automatically and doesn't require deep knowledge about the OS. Most of all, Ubuntu has most beautiful user interface and biggest number of applications which inherited from Debian.

If you want to study Linux or Unix to have a job as sys admin, I am strongly recommend to try CentOS which is from Red Hat and exactly same as RHEL, but FREE. Fedora is another free distribution from Red Hat, but it has different kernel version and Red Hat using it as a kind of experiment or Beta testing before release in RHEL, so it would not be good idea to run something important.
freepgu
it's not matter that which distro is best, because GNU/LINUX is funny and perfect OS!
all you need is learning this os and it's philosophy...
go to distrowatch.com and see which distro you need?
Funny distro:
Slax
Slitaz
TinyCore
Power distro:
Debian
Mint
Suse (opensuse)
Fedora
RHEL and centos
Arch
Gentoo
Special distro:
Kali (aka backtrak)
But!!!
A very nice and a distro for all season is:
Slackware
nicokant
I really suggest Fedora, it's the most stable GNU/Linux distro. I's really easy to install and configure; it comes with a wonderful Desktop Environment (GNOME). You can consider Fedora as the beta version of Red Had, so it's almost perfect! Wink
fooPier
Hi, first at all you want to decide your favourite desktop environment, after this you want to go with ubuntu/kubunti/xubuntu based on your previous choice. After some months of practise with one of this distros I would reecomed you to going with Arch Linux (at first use Architect linux) to install it in the easy way.
You can also take a look at elementaryos, pclinuxos, zorinos for start.
FunDa
CentOS


Ubuntu

Xubuntu
Kunbuntu


Red Hat


SecureLinux
Arrogant
IMO it depends upon what you are looking for in a distribution.
Some prefer customizability and some want to work it out of the box.
If you belong in the latter group you could try any of the Ubuntu variants,
or you could try other distros like ArchLinux, Gentoo, etc.
Da Rossa
So far, the best operating system might be indeed Windows 10. But Windows 7 is more friendly and hassle-free.

I've been venturing in the Linux world, but like I said in here, there are still some necessary apps in Windows that Linux doesn't have, AutoHotKey in particular. Not even Mac OS X has a similar solution.[/url]
Cholen
I have Ubuntu and I like it. I started to use it a year ago and i'm very happy.
Da Rossa
What is your desktop environment, or Ubuntu 'flavour'?
deanhills
If it's for running Websites, CentOS seems to be good for that with Apache, as well as Debian with Nginx. Debian with Nginx take less resources than CentOS, but are a little bit more complicated to set up. CentOS is easier (for now any way).

For desktop applications Zorin looks very much like Windows 7 and has some really great reviews. I'm just about to try it out. Also good for desktop are Kubuntu, Ubuntu Desktop and Cinnamon.

Here is a link to Zorin for download and tutorial:

Website and downloads:
http://zorinos.com/download.html

Tutorial:

Da Rossa
I've had a hard time configuring a virtual machine with VMWare running CentOS 7 to run the full web stack: Apache, MySQL and PHP. There is a 20-to-25-step installation procedure, I always get barred on step 15-18. Razz
SpaceInvader75
This is the first time I got Linux to work, so I can't really answer the original question. But I imagine that just depends on what you want. In my case, I wanted something that is light on resources, and not difficult to use.

I think LXLE is based on Lubuntu. It was pretty easy to install to dual boot, in case I need Windows, but I really don't need to use Windows much. It definitely uses less resources than Vista, and came with most of the software I needed. I'm running it on a dual core computer with only 2Gb ram, and it is still pretty responsive.

I still need to learn more about updating things in Linux, but once I figure that out better I don't see any reason I would want to use any Windows over LXLE, except to play Windows games (and this computer isn't really capable of that anyway).
loveandormoney
The thing is
the people are afraid of Linux
but using is no problem.
jestoy0514
The best Linux distro is entirely up to you. You have to identify your needs and choose accordingly with that. Like for example, if your using an older hardware I may go to Puppy Linux. You can use it in any way you could imagine. Watch movie, listen to music, programming, web server, office suites, surfing the web, video conference, chat. web development and much more. And the fact that you don't need to install it on your hard drive is a plus, decent usb flash drive is enough to power your PC. You may not want to remove your Windows installation and leave it like that. Moreover, it is quite small (only 200 MB*) as compared with other Linux distribution out there.
Strans
hack_man_ wrote:
I currently have Windows XP (god help me) and want to change to Linux. I know that Linux is open-source, but does that mean that it is free? I have no idea on the matter so I decided to consult the forums.

EDIT: New question. See topic title

Stickied by Animal - 31 May 06


I was using Windows XP for a while and I have experienced Linux also, I advise you to use Ubuntu if you are a beginner or use Debian Linux if you are an advanced user for your next operating system with a nice "ready" desktop.
Da Rossa
16.04 LTS is out, I downloaded Ubuntu and ran on a virtual machine. Seems nice. I also came across KDE (Kubuntu) for the first time. The desktop environment seems to be the heaviest, but it is very powerful adn eye candy.
jestoy0514
Da Rossa wrote:
16.04 LTS is out, I downloaded Ubuntu and ran on a virtual machine. Seems nice. I also came across KDE (Kubuntu) for the first time. The desktop environment seems to be the heaviest, but it is very powerful adn eye candy.


That is a good news. I may have to go take at look at it. Thanks you for the info.
PwnArt1st
ARCH Linux is undeniably the best OS for building a light weight, customized linux build, with all of what you want and nothing that you dont, but the fact that you need to install anything and everything yourself through the terminal makes it unsuitable for new users. For someone just getting their feet wet, I would recommend either Ubuntu, or the lighter Linux Mint.
Da Rossa
Quote:

ARCH Linux is undeniably the best OS for building a light weight, customized linux build, with all of what you want and nothing that you dont, but the fact that you need to install anything and everything yourself through the terminal makes it unsuitable for new users. For someone just getting their feet wet, I would recommend either Ubuntu, or the lighter Linux Mint.


You mean Mint MATE?
About Arch, I wish I knew how to install everything manually as they require. Some say it can be the most powerful OS if the user knows what he's doing. Is that true in your opinion?
coder17x
hack_man_ wrote:
I currently have Windows XP (god help me) and want to change to Linux. I know that Linux is open-source, but does that mean that it is free? I have no idea on the matter so I decided to consult the forums.

EDIT: New question. See topic title

Stickied by Animal - 31 May 06


In my mind Linux Mint very friendly!
SonLight
I agree Linux Mint is a very good choice, especially for a new Linux user. I ran Ubuntu for some time before I discovered Mint. I like Mint's approach to setting up a desktop that works a little better out of the box. I've used both Mate and Cinnamon, and been very happy with either of them.

Access to repositories is great with Mint. They modify a number of user-facing packages to make it friendlier. A good example is the software update facility, which by default does NOT update the kernel or other system/hardware oriented packages which might conflict with some hardware. I like to keep relatively current on these, but I only update them when I am comfortable that I can tolerate a serious bug in terms of my time and being positioned to recover using another computer or another boot partition.

I recently discovered that Mint was not upgrading my Opera browser, and it was giving me trouble on some sites (forcing me to use firefox in some cases). I think I caused that, because I did some non-standard stuff at one point when I got a version of Opera that did not work properly, and left it stuck on a specific beta version or something. The problem was solved when I went straight to the Opera site for a download. Opera had had a debian package file, which seems to have been the one I should have been running all along, so now Opera upgrades normally.
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