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Why partition your hard disk





narc
There are many reasons to partition your hard disk, I'm sure there are.

There was a time when drives were little and partitions were sort of fun. Then there were big drives and one huge partition was cool. Then bios was slow to catch up to drives, and partitions were necessary. Then bios caught up, then drives passed it by, and now bios has caught up again, or so it seems.

Linux makes great use of drive partitions for swap files. I like that idea, so I mimmicked it on my windoze system. My setup is like this:

2 hard disks, 2 partitions each

c:\ (HDD1, partition 1, faster of the 2 partitions) - boot files
d:\ (HDD2, partition 1, faster of the 2 paritions) - permanent swap file (pagefile.sys)
e:\ (HDD1, parition 2, slower of the 2 paritions) - documents and settings and temp
f:\ (HDD2, parition 2, slower of the 2 paritions) - random free space

I call parition 1 faster because it is located at the begining of the disk and should be able to lift more data / second.

So, my question is this: how do other people use partitions, if at all, and why?
Neo7
Different partitions can be used to install more than one Windows system...although doing so will hamper your system performance.

Well that's the only way I use it...
Wd_removed
You could probably easily cut that down to 1 hard drive 2 partitions.

Partition 1: System Files (windows etc.)
Partition 2: Storage of files (etc.)
gonzo
partitioning is a great way to manage fragmentation
narc
Welliottdude wrote:
You could probably easily cut that down to 1 hard drive 2 partitions.

Partition 1: System Files (windows etc.)
Partition 2: Storage of files (etc.)


Yeah, that is true, but I am looking for performance. When windoze access the perm swap file you want it to be fast, and not hampered by system file access, so you want your swap file stored at sector 0. The only way to get something as close to sector 0 as possible is to partition the disc and put that file in the first partition.

I also want windoze to boot up fast, so my boot files (or system files in this case) need to be in sector 0. Again, they need to be in the first partition.

So, if you want your permantent swap file to be fast (and who doesn't) then 2 hard discs are called for.

Furthurmore, I shoud say that anyone who has an optical disc connected to the same IDE cable as their boot drive is sacriaficing performance.
MalvagioAddict
i tend to do it because in a way it helps me become more organized when it comes to files and stuff. they each have their own directory so it makes it easier for me to find stuff. Shallow I know
Davidgr1200
Extra partitions are good for when you get fed up of paying a lot of money to Microsoft and want to try out Linux. You can just install it to a free partition and have a play around.
jazrt
for myself.
1 partion for start up.
than c:/ where windows system files..
than d;partion for programs
e: for temp.
f: files
g:/ for games.
h:/than i have a cople of more hardrives. with bak up images of start up and windows.
J:an other drive for downloads .
K:and than hard drive for my art files
neosree
Partitions are there to improve perfomence of HDD and it help me for catogorising contents well.
narc
Neo7 wrote:
Different partitions can be used to install more than one Windows system...although doing so will hamper your system performance.

Well that's the only way I use it...


Goid point, I had not thought about that. And I agree that the OS that is not installed in the first parition will run slower, because it's data is stored closer to the center of the disc.

Thanks for mentioning that.
silliman
Minimally, I like at least 2 partitions on my hard disk. The first partition (C:/) I use for OS and program files, while the second (D:/) is used to store data files.

Although there is NO fail-safe to protect data if your entire hard disk crashes, but... I have on several occasions been able to restore a failed C:/ partition by rebuilding the operating system and "happily" found the data files on D:/ to be safe and sound.

Lastly, I also find that by moving voluminous data files over to the D:/ partition, it is less likely that you'll max out your C:/ partition where the entire sytems slows down because the OS has difficulty finding space on the C:/ partition to swap files in virtual memory.

ciao
Soulfire
The only way I used to install two windows, but that didn't really go as I thought it would, and so now I don't partition my hard drive.
acoassin
I gave up a long time ago about caring about my partitions. Right now I have a 40gig drive in 2 partitions so I can have Linux and Windows (do a lot of programming for school in Linux) and an 80 which is in 2 parts, one small partition for swap/page space and the other is just extra space, increases swap speed to have swap on a different physical drive more than simply putting it on a different partition of the same drive. But it's been like this for 3 years now.

Personally, I think the performance gain is negligable for most people. But if it helps you organize your files or makes you feel better, there's no reason not to do it if you know how.
magnusmoty
that n00b that compiled my comuter spilt my disk to 3 parts....

i have no recources to reformat it, science there is realy big joke collection.....
ocalhoun
My setup:
HDA:
1-Root for SuSE (20 GB)
2-swap (2GB) Wink
3-Raid Partition (40 GB)
4-Transfer (FAT 32, 18GB)
HDB:
1-Windows 2K partition (20GB)
2-Fedora Core 1 Root (20 GB)
3-Corresponding Raid Partition (40 GB)

Both linux distros share a swap partition, so I can afford for it to be huge.
The raid partitions on the two drives are set up for extra reliability. (They're also encrypted)
illini319
Aren't the increases in performance, when one partitions, marginally better than not having partitioned at all? At least given the current BIOS standards. If one really opted for performance, shouldn't one get SCSI based HDD's?
gonzo
Davidgr1200 wrote:
Extra partitions are good for when you get fed up of paying a lot of money to Microsoft and want to try out Linux. You can just install it to a free partition and have a play around.


no, that's a bad idea for most people. One OS per physical device, please.
ocalhoun
Make that one type of OS on one device.
Although linux bootloaders find booting windows difficult, and windows bootloaders find booting linux impossible, They work quite well when working with thier buddies.
narc
ocalhoun wrote:
Make that one type of OS on one device.
Although linux bootloaders find booting windows difficult, and windows bootloaders find booting linux impossible, They work quite well when working with thier buddies.


Agreed. Why can't NTLoader, Grub and Lilo just get along Sad
psycosquirrel
I have 2 hard drives and an external hard drive. All 3 have 1 partition for ease of use; my bios has no problem with them at all.
izcool
Why should you partition a hard drive into chunks ? Real simple.

Almost every hard drive is this way - where it turns up to be a smaller amount of space than it is advertised to be.

Like with the hard drive in this machine, it's advertised as 80GB, but in Windows, it's showing up as 74.5GB. That means that it's 5.5GB smaller than what it's supposed to be. Why is it like that ? Beacuse hard drive manufacturers are basing the rounding system as 1,000MB per GB instead of 1,024MB per GB. How do you get the most out of your hard drive ? Paritition it. You can have several parititions on a hard drive and get the most out of the space that it's advertised at. Although they will be on separate drive letters, but you'll have more space overall. Just to let everyone know, I read that in a book awhile ago. Wink Neat stuff.

Another reason on why you should partition your hard drive as follows. Most of us experience it where we have all of our important files on our computers, and when we do something that we're not supposed to do (or something unfortunate happens)...BOOM. It's all gone. All of your files for several years on end are VANISHED. You pull out your floppy disks and CD's to reformat your computer and all your years of hard work are gone, like it never even happened.

You can partition your hard drive into 2 parts - one for Windows and all of your programs, and the other for your documents. If Windows messes up and there is no way to revert back the changes, you will still have your files on the other partition, safe and sound. You only reformat the one partition that contained your programs and Windows, and you're set. You didn't lose any of your files.

Pretty neat stuff, isn't it ? Those are 2 reasons why I suggest parititioning your hard drive.

I (personally) don't partition my hard drive into several chunks (all of my machines are in one chunk) but I'm sorta lazy like that and don't want to go through all of the mess. Very Happy

- Mike.
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