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Diesel car





jajarvin
I bought my first Diesel car, Citroen Xsara Picasso.

What are the differences between diesel car and bensin car?
What should I to take in consideration?

Have you any suggestions?
SonLight
jajarvin wrote:
I bought my first Diesel car, Citroen Xsara Picasso.

What are the differences between diesel car and bensin car?
What should I to take in consideration?

Have you any suggestions?


One difference I can think of is that the oil gets dirty a lot quicker in a diesel engine. The solution is to change it more often (probably) and to use oil with more detergent (certainly), so that gritty particles stay in suspension. Since a lot of new technology has gone into making diesel engines "nicer" for autos, I don't think anyone can answer that in general. I'd recommend referring to the owner's manual, and take the car to be serviced by a reputable auto service center, not necessarily the nearest 15-minute lube place.

By the way, I think you mean "benzine", not "bensin". Benzine is (to the best of my knowledge) one of the primary ingredients of gasoline (petrol if you are of the British persuasion). I don't know if "benzine" is the usual name in some countries, but it seems reasonable, and if so I'd be interested in hearing which countries. In America, we usually call it "gas" when speaking, but write it more carefully as "gasoline".
jajarvin
SonLight wrote:
jajarvin wrote:
I bought my first Diesel car, Citroen Xsara Picasso.

What are the differences between diesel car and bensin car?
What should I to take in consideration?

Have you any suggestions?


One difference I can think of is that the oil gets dirty a lot quicker in a diesel engine. The solution is to change it more often (probably) and to use oil with more detergent (certainly), so that gritty particles stay in suspension. Since a lot of new technology has gone into making diesel engines "nicer" for autos, I don't think anyone can answer that in general. I'd recommend referring to the owner's manual, and take the car to be serviced by a reputable auto service center, not necessarily the nearest 15-minute lube place.

By the way, I think you mean "benzine", not "bensin". Benzine is (to the best of my knowledge) one of the primary ingredients of gasoline (petrol if you are of the British persuasion). I don't know if "benzine" is the usual name in some countries, but it seems reasonable, and if so I'd be interested in hearing which countries. In America, we usually call it "gas" when speaking, but write it more carefully as "gasoline".


English is not my mother language.
So usually when I write in english, I write it with the help of Google translator.
In this way I can be pretty sure that I am writing english words correctly.
For example I am writing this text in this manner.

I wrote my original comment in a hurry so I had no time to use Google Translator.
The word bensin is not a correct one. As you pointed out the words petrol, gasoline or gas are correct words in this case.
Ankhanu
Gas/Gasoline, yeah Smile

I've had three diesel Volkswagens and a couple gasoline powered cars through the years... honestly, just follow the maintenance schedule and use the recommended oils for your engine, and you'll be golden. I haven't noticed any real difference in oil care between the two engine types, aside from my diesels generally using a higher quality synthetic oil.

In terms of driving, you'll have to get used to warming your glow plugs before starting... mainly just when it's cold... and you might have to plug in a block heater overnight when it's REALLY cold.
The power band tends to be at lower RPMs than gas engines, which gives them a different feel when accelerating. They tend to be a tiny bit spongy at first, like near 1000-1100 RPM, then power/torgue kicks in hard fairly suddenly, while gas engines tend to fairly evenly push until their higher RPM power band.
jajarvin
Ankhanu wrote:
Gas/Gasoline, yeah Smile
The power band tends to be at lower RPMs than gas engines, which gives them a different feel when accelerating. They tend to be a tiny bit spongy at first, like near 1000-1100 RPM, then power/torgue kicks in hard fairly suddenly, while gas engines tend to fairly evenly push until their higher RPM power band.

This is a very interesting point to observe.
It really was a surprise to me how easily my car accelerate at the low RPM.
The driving experience with a diesel car is indeed different from the driving experience with a gasoline car.
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