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Who Loves Vinyl?





Myrecords
I'm not a fan of cd's or mp3's just give me some records and I'm happy, are any of you outthere a lover of good ol-LP'S-45's?
Marcuzzo
whenever I buy a CD, if I really like the album I will usually also buy the Vinyl version.
it's strange but for some reason, vinyl sounds better ( New records, new quality needle, so no crackling)

so far I've got:
- Mothership ( Led Zepeling )
- Lateralus ( Tool )
- 10.000 days ( Tool )
- Ride the lightning ( Metallica )
- Blood Sugar Sex Magic ( Red Hot Chili Peppers )
- L.A. Womand ( the doors )
- Nevermind (Nirvana)

It's a limited collection so far but because of several reasons I haven't been able to go to any record fairs in the last few years
jajarvin
Myrecords wrote:
I'm happy, are any of you outthere a lover of good ol-LP'S-45's?

LP record, a long-playing 12 or 10 inch (30 or 25 cm) vinyl record that spins at 33⅓ rpm
I have lots of old LPs for instance Elvis, Beatles, Rolling Stones.


I have also some EPs.
An EP (short for extended play) is a musical recording that contains more music than a single,
but is usually too short to qualify as a full studio album or LP.
An EP usuallyhas more tracks than a normal single (typically four to six of them).
Ankhanu
Myrecords wrote:
I'm not a fan of cd's or mp3's just give me some records and I'm happy, are any of you outthere a lover of good ol-LP'S-45's?


What about mp3s ripped from vinyl?

I'm fine with vinyl, but I'm not particularly romantic about it. It's a good medium with an interesting aural character, but, in no way do I think it's the be-all, end-all recorded music experience. There are auditory advantages to higher fidelity play back that vinyl just doesn't offer.
jajarvin
Ankhanu wrote:
What about mp3s ripped from vinyl?

For this you need a Record Player.
For here yuo can find a USB LP Vinyl to MP3/WAV Mac PC CD Converter Turntable Record Player
Ankhanu
Yeah... that wasn't the question Razz

The question wasn't how to create one, but about the experience of listening to an mp3 so created vs. listening to a currently spinning record. For those who prefer the sound quality of vinyl, does a direct copy of that sound count?

For sake of argument, let's assume a high bitrate encoding of a high fidelity recording setup, preserving basically all perceptible aspects of the sound. Low fidelity compression need not apply Wink
Myrecords
Ankhanu wrote:
Yeah... that wasn't the question Razz

The question wasn't how to create one, but about the experience of listening to an mp3 so created vs. listening to a currently spinning record. For those who prefer the sound quality of vinyl, does a direct copy of that sound count?

For sake of argument, let's assume a high bitrate encoding of a high fidelity recording setup, preserving basically all perceptible aspects of the sound. Low fidelity compression need not apply Wink
Umm this is getting a bit technical,the question is...do you like vinyl?
Ankhanu
Myrecords wrote:
Umm this is getting a bit technical,the question is...do you like vinyl?


You prefaced the question saying that you're not a fan of mp3s, preferring vinyl. I was just curious if a reproduction of the vinyl sound in an mp3 would satisfy the same sound need... or if it has to be a record.

You don't need to answer of course, but, I'd certainly be interested to hear the answer. It would start to get into what about vinyl that makes it preferable (to some).. the why of it, which, IMO, is a more interesting question than whether or not one likes something.
Myrecords
Ankhanu wrote:
Myrecords wrote:
Umm this is getting a bit technical,the question is...do you like vinyl?


You prefaced the question saying that you're not a fan of mp3s, preferring vinyl. I was just curious if a reproduction of the vinyl sound in an mp3 would satisfy the same sound need... or if it has to be a record.

You don't need to answer of course, but, I'd certainly be interested to hear the answer. It would start to get into what about vinyl that makes it preferable (to some).. the why of it, which, IMO, is a more interesting question than whether or not one likes something.
I just like vinyl, yes I know about the sound quality of the MP3 but I also know that if you keep your records in good condition including upgrading them from time to time as well as having a good turntable and stylus that you can get some quality sound there too, maybe I'm just to stubborn to change or maybe it's just too much darn technology replacing things that I grew up loving. I'm glad to still be able to actually buy vinyl records at a good price because I do realize that the time will come when I won't....I'm just an old school dude.
Ankhanu
That's cool. You're definitely in luck these days, though, with the resurgence in vinyl as a collectible medium; new shops are opening all the time, and more and more artists are releasing and re-releasing their material on vinyl. I think you'll be collecting vinyl for some time yet.
I've certainly considered working on a record collection of my own; I only own a couple, and I do love owning physical media!

Something like an mp3, cd, or other digital media, is often criticized as lacking character, or being too sterile. Many hail vinyl as the "true listening experience", that there's a quality, character or warmth in the hiss of the needle scraping across the vinyl, in the pops and crackles. I mean, I kind of get that, but I also think that the quality of the systems, speakers/headphones most people listen on reduces the differences quite significantly... a high quality system will bring out nuances that normally go unheard. I also understand how different elements of the circuits involved in playback can alter the character, warmth, etc; e.g. tubes vs. transistors... but again, I really do think those nuances are largely lost on a wider audience.

There is a certain ritual to listening to vinyl that, perhaps, encourages one to actually really listen to the music. Listening to vinyl takes work and effort... perhaps that effort helps one to appreciate what they're listening to. Digital music is easy; click a couple buttons and it's going... it's easy to put aside while you do something else. Perhaps we don't listen as closely to digital media as we might vinyl?
deanhills
I find vinyl records take up too much space. I got rid of my Vinyl a few years ago. Also easy for records to get scratched. Record player also takes up too much space. Not knowing where I'm going to be in a few months from now, traveling light is a priority. I've made copies of all of my CDs on my computer and flash disks. Just about as good as it will be getting.

Must say however a year ago when I was in South Africa I was eyeing a very old Blaupunkt Hi-Fi Stereo player at a friend of my great aunt's. Still in excellent condition. Maybe I should make her an offer or something if it is still around by the time I get settled again.
truespeed
Ankhanu wrote:


There is a certain ritual to listening to vinyl that, perhaps, encourages one to actually really listen to the music. Listening to vinyl takes work and effort... perhaps that effort helps one to appreciate what they're listening to. Digital music is easy; click a couple buttons and it's going... it's easy to put aside while you do something else. Perhaps we don't listen as closely to digital media as we might vinyl?


This is the main advantage of vinyl, songs can't be skipped so easily, so you tend to play an album the whole way through, listening to songs that on first listen don't sound so good, but after repeat hearings end up being your favourite songs.

Vinyl covers also make it a tactile experience as well, adding another dimension to the listening experience.
Josso
Yeah good points in here, as truespeed said the cover art is much bigger so you really can do a lot more detail. As a producer the sound is just lush on most things, surprisingly even on some modern genres, someone tried to explain it to me once I think it's regarding different frequency responses especially around 11khz. Some of the artists I know will actually only do vinyl releases of stuff, I've got a ton of new 12" not particularly heavyweight though one thing about the new vinyl market which is annoying is the multi disc albums but I usually buy EPs. Most places nowdays will sell you a 12" and give you the mp3s/flacs/whatever format you want at the same time. I get 12"+flac for like a tenner including delivery from the UK and usually about 15 abroad brand new, brilliant stuff it's usually how I buy things.

It was funny when I saw this thread I thought you were talking about the new HBO show, I was like "I love vinyl Very Happy" and then suddenly after "I love vinyl Very Happy"
deanhills
Josso wrote:
It was funny when I saw this thread I thought you were talking about the new HBO show, I was like "I love vinyl Very Happy" and then suddenly after "I love vinyl Very Happy"
Haha. I was thinking of Ocalhoun and the MLP show - Vinyl Scratch. Then of course saw this was for the real vinyl records.

I wonder what they do these days with scratched records. Have they found a way to fix them? One of the reasons I found them quite hazardous is that they get scratched and dust is a real menace for Vinyl records. I'm sure however that with modern day technology they must have discovered solutions for the new generation of vinyl records - like maybe anti-scratch dust-proof vinyl records?
Ankhanu
deanhills wrote:
I wonder what they do these days with scratched records. Have they found a way to fix them? One of the reasons I found them quite hazardous is that they get scratched and dust is a real menace for Vinyl records. I'm sure however that with modern day technology they must have discovered solutions for the new generation of vinyl records - like maybe anti-scratch dust-proof vinyl records?

Higher quality vinyl tends to be more common these days, primarily because it is a niche market of primarily collectors who want "the best". But, there's no real way to prevent dust and scratches aside from careful use and storage.
Josso
You can carefully EQ them out and it sounds ok but you are going to lose some detail and change the sound of the track. It's like when you cut vocals out of a track, you can never really do it properly without the masters
BigGeek
I think it is great that there are people that still love vinyl. I still have my old collection from back in the 70's and 80's of LPs. The problem is that over a decade ago my turntable had problems and I could not find any cartridges for it, I ended up selling it at a yard sale and never replaced it. Now that vinyl is making a resurgence it might be worth my while to purchase a new turntable.

If I am not mistaken vinyl is analog waves where MP3's and CD's are digital signal. From what I understand the digital signal is clearer and the players loose no quality of sound as compared to the turn table and the needle. About 15 years ago I bought a few CD sets that were recorded off the original tapes when the albums were recorded back in the 1960's and 1970's. You could hear all kinds of sounds that did not get transferred to the albums, things like squeaky base drum pedal, a bottle dropping on the floor, people whispering in the background. I wasn't real fond of the recording but there were those that said it was nostalgic to hear all that on the recording!

You know when it comes to high end stereo systems vacuum tube amplifiers are still considered the end all in sound quality, apparently the analog signal is a much cleaner reproduction of the sound than the digital signal.

I have a friend that has a real high end stereo system and he has analog vacuum tube amps, but they are connected to a solid state pre-amp, and he plays CD's and MP3's on it. I honestly cannot tell a difference in the sound using digital recordings and having them come out the speakers analog in comparison to playing vinyl on his turn table. But then again even the vinyl is converted to a digital signal and then back to analog.

So what is the situations with turn tables - I know direct drive turn tables used to be the way to go, I was wondering if that was still the case?
standready
First, I am old. I have over three thousand pieces in vinyl. Of course, we did not have much choice except 8-tracks and cassettes (which were poor sound compared to vinyl not to mention they wear out easier). Probably have around 300 CDs.
Yes Dean, collection takes a large amount of space. Can you image how long it would take to convert my collection?
deanhills
standready wrote:
Yes Dean, collection takes a large amount of space. Can you image how long it would take to convert my collection?
Forever! How would you do it though? How does one convert vinyl recordings to CD?
Marcuzzo
deanhills wrote:
standready wrote:
Yes Dean, collection takes a large amount of space. Can you image how long it would take to convert my collection?
Forever! How would you do it though? How does one convert vinyl recordings to CD?


you need to buy a special turntable for that: eg: http://www.amazon.com/ION-Profile-LP-Vinyl-to-MP3-Turntable/dp/B0029QRA1U
Ankhanu
You don't even need a special turntable, though that makes things easier. As long as you have a line-in on your sound card, and a line-out on your turntable, you can rip from any given turntable. It takes more effort/time than ripping a CD, but about the same as ripping a tape.

With your ripping software, just select the line in, adjust output and input volumes to make sure that you're getting as much signal as you can without clipping, and you're good to go. It's probably fastest to rip an entire side of an LP as a single track then cut it up digitally, but you could go track by track. Obviously the process is a 1:1 time requirement, there's no speeding up the process like you could when dubbing tapes or something, sending 1 second of audio for processing is going to take 1 second; the encoding will be pretty much instant though with a modern computer Razz
standready
deanhills wrote:
Forever! How would you do it though? How does one convert vinyl recordings to CD?

My estimate of recordings was purchased and did not include demo recordings which are countless of boxes full. So much great stuff - so little time to enjoy.
Josso
Ankhanu wrote:
You don't even need a special turntable, though that makes things easier. As long as you have a line-in on your sound card, and a line-out on your turntable, you can rip from any given turntable. It takes more effort/time than ripping a CD, but about the same as ripping a tape.


Yeah this, it is all real time so it basically just takes as long as the songs are plus a bit to render, ID3 tag, etc. I ripped some tapes a while back and it did take quite a bit although you don't have to listen to it you can use another computer or something for a bit. As I mentioned earlier this is why I love buying vinyl that automatically comes with any digital format you want. Definitely my purchasing method of choice.
spinout
Of course I do. But I have sold a lot of Vinyl.... But I got a stack left with the best albums. And a got a working player, from 1973....
Insanity
While vinyl is nice, the compactness of CDs and other forms of media makes things much more convenient than having to lug around this giant disc that can only be played on a very specific machine.
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