FRIHOSTFORUMSSEARCHFAQTOSBLOGSCOMPETITIONS
You are invited to Log in or Register a free Frihost Account!


Linux - Red Hat





Jack_Hammer
I am currently installing a fairly old version of Red Hat Linux that has been lying around for ages and recently I plucked up the courage to actually try it out and see whether I liked it or not and if so then continue to install the latest version of the GNU basic Linux built for 64 bit processors (I have also been thinking about buying a AMD Athlon 64 4800 with Dual Core though they probably cost more than my computer does ATM) but I was wondering what is the difference between the different major re-distributors (i.e Red Hat Mandrake) are and how easy is it to find software (and maybe games) that are both 64 bit and built for linux (and where to get them from?).
Davidgr1200
Linux is best obtained by downloading from Internet if you have broadband. Otherwise you can buy one of the Linux magazines which has a CD (or DVD) with a free distribution on it. If you just want to try it out something like Morphix (http://www.morphix.org) or Knoppix (http://www.knoppix.org/) are good as you can boot direct from a CD.
http://www.frozentech.com/content/livecd.php has a list of live cds (i.e. linux which you can run direct from a cd)
Personally I use Gentoo which takes about three days to install (most of the time it is doing things so you don't have to wait up all night!) but does work (much to my surprise) and is very easy to upgrade - if you have broadband.

Good luck
boho999
I have also found an old distribution of Redhat sitting in a drare. I did install it, simple as a dream) at work a few years ago and that server is used som CVS and Bugzilla. Much to my surpise I have almost forgotten about it because it just sits there and does just what it is supposed to do without causing any worries! Now I thought I would get into Linux again and found something called Fedora, which is a project close to RedHat but not part of RedHat. Does anyone have any experience of Fedora?
Jack_Hammer
boho999 wrote:
I have also found an old distribution of Redhat sitting in a drare. I did install it, simple as a dream) at work a few years ago and that server is used som CVS and Bugzilla. Much to my surpise I have almost forgotten about it because it just sits there and does just what it is supposed to do without causing any worries! Now I thought I would get into Linux again and found something called Fedora, which is a project close to RedHat but not part of RedHat. Does anyone have any experience of Fedora?


Fedora is currently the version I am downloading and hopefully will install, it is a supported project by Red Hat but nothing to do with Red Hat itself, I don't know what it will be like but hopefully it will work unlike the version of Red Hat I just installed that doesn't work at all, so at the moment I am left without a computer that works.
thecosmickickstarts
Hi, I wasnt quite sure where to post this question - but a post on Linux seem approriate! Apologies if its already been ansewered, I'm sure you'll re-direct me...

Anyway, yes - Hopefully I'll be getting a laptop sometime next week and for various reasons have decided I want to run the Linux platform on it. I love open-source software and customising things untill they actually look like me, so thought it would be a good choice... But the quesiton is, how do I acheive this??

It'll be a top of the range Toshiba laptop, with Windows XP pre-installed I imainge. Do I have to completly wipe the hardisks etc? Or can I run the Linux alongside the Windows XP? Is Linux a single operating a system, or am I right in thinking that maybe its simply a platform upon which many different open-source Operating Systems may run?

Many thanks!
ocalhoun
I use SuSE, and I would call it the 2nd best overall and the all-time easiest to install and modify.
Redhat is, probobly the best, expecialy if you want to install additional software. However, SuSE can usualy use Redhat RPM's.
Personaly, I would classify all other distros as being slightly lesser than these two.
Grimboy
Thecosmic: You have to partition your hardisk using a tool called fdisk and then use a tool called a bootloader (I recomend lilo) there are several guides to do this. Here the top ones from a google search:

http://www.overclockersclub.com/guides/dual_boot_fedora_xp.php
http://users.tkk.fi/~tkarvine/linux-windows-dual-boot-resizing-ntfs.html
http://www.linuxcompatible.org/Dual_boot_Win_xp_and_Fedora_core_t32552.html
kasper5150
If you are having issues with formatting your hard drive... I just wanted to suggest a great alternative. Cosmopod.com...it is an ssl based vnc client that works with java that brings you kde 3.4 with all your apps that you need to get started. It is a fedora core 4 box. and it is amazing... all you have to do is install the client, read the directions, register an acct, and then you are off. I fyou have some spare ram(more than 256k) then it should load quick. make sure you have broadband also.
mOrpheuS
thecosmickickstarts wrote:
Hopefully I'll be getting a laptop sometime next week and for various reasons have decided I want to run the Linux platform on it. I love open-source software and customising things untill they actually look like me, so thought it would be a good choice... But the quesiton is, how do I acheive this??

It'll be a top of the range Toshiba laptop, with Windows XP pre-installed I imainge. Do I have to completly wipe the hardisks etc? Or can I run the Linux alongside the Windows XP? Is Linux a single operating a system, or am I right in thinking that maybe its simply a platform upon which many different open-source Operating Systems may run?

You can run linux alongside XP (well actually one at a time)
To have your laptop loaded with both windows and linux, I'll suggest you create a new partition out of the free space on your disk. (using a tool like partition manager or similar)
Then install linux onto this partition.
You'll also need to be able to boot to either OS later on.
The bootloader that linux will give you an option to install will take care this.

If you are not very familiar with Linux, you can obtain one of the CD based linux ditributions (Knoppix is a popular one) and try linux risk-free.
This should be the easiest way to get you started with linux.

I have both Windows 2003 server and Mandrake linux installed on my machine and I have used almost all other versions of windows and several other mainstream linux distributions as well.
And from my own experience, I can say that even a windows native can feel almost at home with linux. And without much effort too.

(it's a different thing that I still prefer windows Wink )
Davidgr1200
Probably a good idea to try it out something like Morphix (http://www.morphix.org) or Knoppix (http://www.knoppix.org/) as you can boot direct from a CD and can make sure it works before installing on your disk.
http://www.frozentech.com/content/livecd.php has a list of live cds so there is plenty of choice!
iphp
O ,I use debian. I think debian is beter than others. Easily to install form net, and can install software which you really need form net, fast!
Related topics
What is your operating system?
IBM, Red Hat widen Linux mainframe promotion
Co sadzicie o linuxie, jako systemie do domu...
Co s±dzicie o Informatyce w szkołach?
Linux
Best flavor of Linux?
partition + linux
Which linux is the best for a new user?
An end to OS and distro debate (read)
Pirated Software : What if we can't afford original ones
Red Hat gives up on Fedora Foundation
Linux or Windows for server hosting
RED HAT LINUX
Who Still Uses Windows 98 "I do!"
Reply to topic    Frihost Forum Index -> General -> General Chat

FRIHOST HOME | FAQ | TOS | ABOUT US | CONTACT US | SITE MAP
© 2005-2011 Frihost, forums powered by phpBB.