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The Protein Problem





CreativeVeganCooking
This is part one of an article I wrote about protein. There are links to the other parts. I hope you enjoy it!

The Protein Problem, Part 1: The Body's Protein Needs
"In spite of what millions of dollars of meat and dairy industry advertising would have you believe, it is excess, not inadequate protein, that is the threat to health," says Alan Goldhamer, D.C. (1). Most people value protein as the most important calorie source, which will efficiently build muscle, give strength, and promote weight loss. People have focused on eating enough of this necessary nutrient ever since it was discovered in 1839. Meat has been considered the best protein source and is described as high quality protein as opposed to plant protein. "Eat the ox to become strong as an ox!" people say. Therefore, it is interesting to look at how much protein the human body actually needs.

All proteins are made up of amino acids, and the body uses twenty different amino acids to synthesize its own proteins. Eight of these amino acids are essential, which means that the body cannot produce them itself (2). In addition to being able to synthesize the other twelve amino acids, the body also reuses essential amino acids, so that only about 30% of the body's protein needs must be supplied through the diet to make up for inevitable losses. Goldhamer describes this phenomena by saying, "We are in a sense all flesh eaters, a form of self-cannibalization" (3). The official recommended daily allowance (RDA) for protein, as determined by the National Academy of Sciences, is therefore only 10% of total calorie intake, or 0.8 g. per kilo bodyweight. This means that if you weigh 176 lb. (80 kg.), you would need 64 g. of protein a day. To further point out how little protein is needed through the diet, it is interesting to notice how much protein there is in mother milk, as it is in the first six months of life that a human being grows the most. Surprisingly enough, mother milk contains only 2% protein! So if a growing infant's diet consists of only 2% protein, a full-grown adult would not need much more than this.*

Science now also shows that it is not necessary to eat all the essential amino acids at one meal for the body to be able to utilize them to synthesize proteins (4). As long as you get all the different amino acids throughout the day, then that is sufficient, says T. Colin Campbell, Ph.D. (5). Before, it was believed that you had to eat all the essential amino acids at the same meal for the body to be able to use them, and this supposition led to the belief that meat protein was the best protein choice, since meat contains all the essential amino acids in a ratio, which is very similar to the one the body uses. This myth, however, was based on the fact that all the different amino acids must be present at the protein synthesis. Scientists did not yet realize that the body recycles amino acids, so that it can build complete proteins from an incomplete assortment of building block, so to speak. Studies have even been conducted that show that an animal can continue growing, even though slowly, on a diet totally void of one of the essential nutrients (6). This shows how wonderfully God has created the body to be able to make up for such a deficiency.

What do you think about the necessity of protein intake? Voice your opinion in the comments!

* We must here consider that the milk contains a lot of water; if the water was removed, the concentration would, of course, be higher.


Part 2: Animal Protein and the Body http://creativevegancooking.blogspot.com/2014/06/if-you-missed-part-one-read-it-here.html
Part 3: Protein and Strength http://creativevegancooking.blogspot.com/2014/06/the-protein-problem-part-3-protein-and.html
Part 4: Animal Protein and Cancer http://creativevegancooking.blogspot.com/2014/06/the-protein-problem-part-4-animal.html
Part 5: How to Get Enough Protein From a Vegan Diet http://creativevegancooking.blogspot.com/2014/06/the-protein-problem-part-5-how-to-get.html


(1) Goldhamer, Alan, D.C. "Where Do You Get Your Protein?" October 15, 1997. http://nutritionstudies.org/get-protein-where/ (Accessed May 12, 2014)
(2) Ibid
(3) Ibid
(4) Ibid
(5) Campbell, T. Colin, PhD. "The Protein Puzzle: Picking up the Pieces." August 1, 1995. http://nutritionstudies.org/protein-puzzle-picking-pieces/ (Accessed May 12, 2014)
(6) Goldhamer, Alan, D.C. "Where Do You Get Your Protein?" October 15, 1997. http://nutritionstudies.org/get-protein-where/ (Accessed May 12, 2014)[img][/img][/b]
kaysch
CreativeVeganCooking wrote:
"In spite of what millions of dollars of meat and dairy industry advertising would have you believe, it is excess, not inadequate protein, that is the threat to health,"


I tend to agree. I guess the ideal diet is one where your body gets everything it needs, not too little and not too much. Unfortunately I don't stick to that myself very well...
mshafiq
you can eat lentils and red meat.
jajarvin
Eggs are a good source of protein.
SonLight
It is interesting that the two most recent responses both talk about how to get enough protein, whereas the OP's point is that many frequently get _too much_ protein. The OP position is valid in the sense that a large excess of protein in the diet can lead to health problems.

Protein is composed of amino acids. If the body breaks down protein to use as energy, the kidneys and liver are overworked to eliminate the unneeded acids, and the body's chemical balance may be affected unfavorably. On the other hand, of the three major sources of calories, protein is the only one that is absolutely essential to human life.

A human should get 10 to 20 grams a day of essential fatty acids, but these are very specific types of oil and not large in quantity. You should be able to avoid all other fats entirely; however you are likely to overwork the sugar balance system of your body if you do. There is no known need for any carbohydrates. The only caution about that is to make sure to limit the amount of saturated fat you consume.
nam_siddharth
I have never heard that high dose of protein is bad for health. May be some time of protein, which are hard to digest harm health.
deanhills
Afacematrix once put it in a nutshell for me. The amount of nutrition one gets from a square inch of flesh protein such as meat/fish/chicken would equate several cups of legumes to get the same value at a much higher comparable calorie intake. It has been proven that the nutrition of a fist size of meat/fish/chicken/eggs satisfies one's appetite so much that one would need less snacking than someone who needs to eat legumes, nuts etc all day and is rarely satisfied. One could probably overeat on protein, but I just can't see it happening, unless one is really greedy. One obviously also needs a variety of fruits and vegetables for roughage, vitamins and minerals and fruits and vegetables should make up the bulk of any meal. However, one doesn't need much of meat/fish/chicken/eggs to get maximum nutrition. Everything in balance of course, but protein is a very important building block in any consideration for optimal nutrition.
BigGeek
OK I have to weigh in - if excess protein causes health problems then all the body builders would be suffering some sort of ailments from excess protein - so I do not think that excess protein presents problems in but a small percentage of the population that has problems digesting it - or suffers from allergies.

Next is how much protein - the body builders have suggested for the last 40 years that one gram of protein for pound of body weight is necessary to maintain muscle growth under a progressive resistance training program. This has worked quite well for them and I can testify to the effectiveness of this dietary intake.

I do believe that inactive people not stressing their bodies regularly do not need as much protein, like was previously mentioned a diet of only proteins and the liver will adapt and manufacture all it needs from protein alone - as long as essential fats are in the mix - and I agree this is not optimum for optimum body composition. On a side note an all protein and fats diet is used as a treatment for type ii diabetes when you deal with Chinese Herbal Docs and Acupuncturists.

So with all that said here is how to compute your diet - body building style!

For ease of calculation I'm going to use a 1000 calorie diet.

OK so optimum break down of your calorie intake is 40-30-30, 40% Carbs, 30% Protein, 30% Fats.

Out of 1000 calories 400 Cals carbs, 300 Cals protein, 300 Cals fats. Carbs and Proteins are roughly 4 calories per gram, fats 9 calories per gram.

400/4=100 Grams of Carbs
300/4=75 Grams of Protein
300/9=33 Grams of Fats


Divide the grams by 3, and you get: 33 Grams of Carbs, 25 Grams of Protein, and 11 Grams of Fats.

You then plan each meal so that you are consuming those ratios for the meal along with healthy fats, quality proteins, and good carbs (not junk carbs).

That is how body builders are taught to plan their diet, this is known as dialing in your diet!

Getting back on topic - I think that if you are active, plan your meals correctly and get adequate amounts of proteins you will be healthy and live longer than most - IMHO
Cool
mshafiq
Very interesting informations and calculations. Good job
loveandormoney
CreativeVeganCooking wrote:
This is part one of an article I wrote about protein. There are links to the other parts. I hope you enjoy it!

The Protein Problem, Part 1: The Body's Protein Needs
"In spite of what millions of dollars of meat and dairy industry advertising would have you believe, it is excess, not inadequate protein, that is the threat to health," says Alan Goldhamer, D.C. (1). Most people value protein as the most important calorie source, which will efficiently build muscle, give strength, and promote weight loss. People have focused on eating enough of this necessary nutrient ever since it was discovered in 1839. Meat has been considered the best protein source and is described as high quality protein as opposed to plant protein. "Eat the ox to become strong as an ox!" people say. Therefore, it is interesting to look at how much protein the human body actually needs.

All proteins are made up of amino acids, and the body uses twenty different amino acids to synthesize its own proteins. Eight of these amino acids are essential, which means that the body cannot produce them itself (2). In addition to being able to synthesize the other twelve amino acids, the body also reuses essential amino acids, so that only about 30% of the body's protein needs must be supplied through the diet to make up for inevitable losses. Goldhamer describes this phenomena by saying, "We are in a sense all flesh eaters, a form of self-cannibalization" (3). The official recommended daily allowance (RDA) for protein, as determined by the National Academy of Sciences, is therefore only 10% of total calorie intake, or 0.8 g. per kilo bodyweight. This means that if you weigh 176 lb. (80 kg.), you would need 64 g. of protein a day. To further point out how little protein is needed through the diet, it is interesting to notice how much protein there is in mother milk, as it is in the first six months of life that a human being grows the most. Surprisingly enough, mother milk contains only 2% protein! So if a growing infant's diet consists of only 2% protein, a full-grown adult would not need much more than this.*

Science now also shows that it is not necessary to eat all the essential amino acids at one meal for the body to be able to utilize them to synthesize proteins (4). As long as you get all the different amino acids throughout the day, then that is sufficient, says T. Colin Campbell, Ph.D. (5). Before, it was believed that you had to eat all the essential amino acids at the same meal for the body to be able to use them, and this supposition led to the belief that meat protein was the best protein choice, since meat contains all the essential amino acids in a ratio, which is very similar to the one the body uses. This myth, however, was based on the fact that all the different amino acids must be present at the protein synthesis. Scientists did not yet realize that the body recycles amino acids, so that it can build complete proteins from an incomplete assortment of building block, so to speak. Studies have even been conducted that show that an animal can continue growing, even though slowly, on a diet totally void of one of the essential nutrients (6). This shows how wonderfully God has created the body to be able to make up for such a deficiency.

What do you think about the necessity of protein intake? Voice your opinion in the comments!

* We must here consider that the milk contains a lot of water; if the water was removed, the concentration would, of course, be higher.


Part 2: Animal Protein and the Body http://creativevegancooking.blogspot.com/2014/06/if-you-missed-part-one-read-it-here.html
Part 3: Protein and Strength http://creativevegancooking.blogspot.com/2014/06/the-protein-problem-part-3-protein-and.html
Part 4: Animal Protein and Cancer http://creativevegancooking.blogspot.com/2014/06/the-protein-problem-part-4-animal.html
Part 5: How to Get Enough Protein From a Vegan Diet http://creativevegancooking.blogspot.com/2014/06/the-protein-problem-part-5-how-to-get.html


(1) Goldhamer, Alan, D.C. "Where Do You Get Your Protein?" October 15, 1997. http://nutritionstudies.org/get-protein-where/ (Accessed May 12, 2014)
(2) Ibid
(3) Ibid
(4) Ibid
(5) Campbell, T. Colin, PhD. "The Protein Puzzle: Picking up the Pieces." August 1, 1995. http://nutritionstudies.org/protein-puzzle-picking-pieces/ (Accessed May 12, 2014)
(6) Goldhamer, Alan, D.C. "Where Do You Get Your Protein?" October 15, 1997. http://nutritionstudies.org/get-protein-where/ (Accessed May 12, 2014)[img][/img][/b]





The problem is the combination.

So what kind of protein are You eating at what time?
deanhills
I also think it has to do with the whole picture of lifestyle. Someone who doesn't move around much and is basically sedentary won't need that much protein. Digestion of protein may also be much poorer than someone who is much more active. Food combinations are also very important. When one has protein suggestion is to go light on carbs and focus on vegetables instead of cereals as the right accompaniment for protein.
Insanity
You can get lots of protein through supplements. I think a lot of weightlifters and bodybuilders take a lot of protein supplements in the form of whey powder that provides them with more than enough protein. I've heard that the basic intake for thsee folks is that there should be about the same grams of protein as your body weight in lbs. I find this to be a lot of protein because I don't know if I can consume that much on a daily basis.
janefirst
Soa beans are the richest source of proteins. Egg, whole wheat also contain proteins. Proteins help to make muscles and blood in our body. Milk also contain it.
loveandormoney
Rich but not rich in the family. In Canada they create a medicine against cancer made out of proteins. So You have to be careful.
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