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Is necessary the most difficult word to spell?





truespeed
Certain words I always have to spell check the correct spelling before posting,necessary is the one that occurs most often,what other words continue to flummux you?
catscratches
Not necessarily.
Peterssidan
No, unnecessary is even harder.
Blaster
Weird ones like schedule, Wednesday, electrical, environment. A few others I can't think of right now are words I see myself having problems with
Sylin
For me, this have to be the word manoeuvre (maneuver in US)..
deanhills
Sylin wrote:
For me, this have to be the word manoeuvre (maneuver in US)..
Right, that would be mine as well.

An additional question, where do people look it up? I just type it in Google search engine. Or if I want something more specific that goes beyond spelling, Dictionary.com or urbandictionary.com
Peterssidan
I can never spell exercise correctly. I usually spell it as "excersise" and that is too much wrong for the browser spell checker to suggest the correct word so I always have to look it up elsewhere.
truespeed
Sylin wrote:
For me, this have to be the word manoeuvre (maneuver in US)..


While I agree it is a difficult word to spell,it is not one that would come up often while typing.

Blaster wrote:
Weird ones like schedule, Wednesday, electrical, environment. A few others I can't think of right now are words I see myself having problems with


Americans don't pronounce the Sh sound in schedule so I can see why that may be difficult a word,whereas we in the UK do,so it is not so difficult a word to remember the spelling of.

Environment is a bit like government,as the N isn't pronounced it is easy to forget it is there.
Blaster
I also mess up Quite Quit and Quiet. I misuse all these words and use them interchangeably.
william
I used to mess up "recommend" quite a bit, but only when typing. My fingers would naturally type a double "c" even though I knew there was only one.

What I really have trouble with is British place names, such as Worcester. I'm no linguist, so I never grasped why it's pronounced "Wooster". If someone says "Wooster", I have to pause for a moment and think of what town it matches up with the map I have in my head, pronounce it wor-sester, then spell it out. Same with Gloucester (Glow-sester? No, Gloster...) or Leicester (Lester). The one that I never get right is Happisburgh (Hazebruh...I don't even...).
deanhills
william wrote:
What I really have trouble with is British place names, such as Worcester. I'm no linguist, so I never grasped why it's pronounced "Wooster". If someone says "Wooster", I have to pause for a moment and think of what town it matches up with the map I have in my head, pronounce it wor-sester, then spell it out. Same with Gloucester (Glow-sester? No, Gloster...) or Leicester (Lester). The one that I never get right is Happisburgh (Hazebruh...I don't even...).
I think they do it deliberately to keep those who are not of the Island perpetually at a disadvantage. Razz
catscratches
I always forget whether it's two 'c':s or 's':s in occasion.
jamesparker
Yeah, it happens to me to, and i think its very natural.
sonam
Thanks to god for browser spell check otherwise I will type lot of words wrong. In the past (2005) any longer message I must copy paste in Word to check are message correct wrote. Shocked

My number of knowing words are very limited and I still have lot of typing mistakes but how I know always making mistake when write "Psyhological" instead of Psychological.

Sonam
Blaster
Very true sonam I misspell words left and right so thank god for spell check.
truespeed
Loose for lose never gets picked up by spell check unfortunately.
StriderVM
You and you're. I'm not saying people misspell them, more like use them improperly in a sentence. Razz
deanhills
StriderVM wrote:
You and you're. I'm not saying people misspell them, more like use them improperly in a sentence. Razz
Right. Like its and it's. But that's probably more an issue of grammar?
truespeed
We should all just ditch spelling correctly and embrace txt speak,u cant spell rongly with tht.
chasbeen
No Mistemplechotech is although necessary is a more common word..
deanhills
truespeed wrote:
We should all just ditch spelling correctly and embrace txt speak,u cant spell rongly with tht.
I hope I'll be dead by then as I'm a Grammar Nazi and proud of it .... hehe .... Laughing
Peterssidan
chasbeen wrote:
No Mistemplechotech is although necessary is a more common word..

Is that even a word?
playfungames
I am not confused with necessary but I am confused with other words that have double characters. Words such as annihilator, assassin, caribbean (carribbean/carribean) etc. tend to confuse me a lot. Thank god, we have spell checks these days. It would be almost impossible for me to have a spelling error free writing if we did it by hand.
Peterssidan
I often have to think twice when writing which and witch. I know the difference but I easily make a mistake if I don't stop and think for a second.
codegeek
I always get "accommodate" wrong. Even now I had to right click on the red line and hit the right spelling. Smile
catscratches
Peterssidan wrote:
chasbeen wrote:
No Mistemplechotech is although necessary is a more common word..

Is that even a word?
Maybe chasbeen just misspelled it.
jajarvin
Thanks Cool
deanhills
Diarrhea can be challenging. Think
Blaster
I also always have trouble with government. I seem to forget the n in it most of the times.
deanhills
Blaster wrote:
I also always have trouble with government. I seem to forget the n in it most of the times.
I don't blame you. That "n" does sound kind'a redundant. Very Happy
Blaster
Its that damn english language that does that... Like where is the K in knife or knee...
deanhills
Or the "r" in barn. Or the "h" in wheel.
Vanilla
Definitely the most difficult word to spell in English is definitely! Do you know any other word that has an exclusive website just for pointing its correct spelling?
SonLight
At least the r and h have some effect on what is heard. The 'wh' in wheel together form a single sound, although it's a little like two sounds, as if they were in the other order. I think some phonetic spellings actually represent it as hw, which it sounds like but is influenced by the blending. In American English (with the notable exception of "Noo Yoohk" and vicinity) the ar make a unique blend, with a little bit of an "r" sound in the blend. In British English, I think, there is little or no "r" sound, but supposedly it sounds different than "bahn" or "ban" or "bon" would.

Sometimes I even imagine I can hear some difference between "lam" -- to be on the run, and "lamb" -- a young sheep. But I really think that one is all in my head. I have no doubt that there was some audible difference a few centuries ago.
Blaster
the r in Barn is totally heard. At least in the way we pronounce it. And definitely is one that I always find myself using the spell checker on.
deanhills
Blaster wrote:
the r in Barn is totally heard. At least in the way we pronounce it. And definitely is one that I always find myself using the spell checker on.
I rarely hear it, but then maybe I need some hearing equipment. I just hear a long "aaaaaaaaaaaaa" ending in an "en". Vowel into only one consonant. I don't need spell check with it though. One sort of gets used to it over a life time of using it. "r" is probably necessary as otherwise it would be "ban". The "a" sound would change completely. Any way, I'm sure there must be some good sense in it, I'm everything but an expert on it.
Peterssidan
Don't you put the tongue further back when pronouncing "rn" compared to a normal "n"?
deanhills
Peterssidan wrote:
Don't you put the tongue further back when pronouncing "rn" compared to a normal "n"?
Probably. Although I've never really been focused where my tongue is. Probably taken it for granted. But now you mention it, feels that way.
Nyasro
It's a natural. This happens to me as well.
Blaster
Part of it has to do with your accent. And yes we all have them. For example I'm from Philadelphia, so water is pronounced wooder and Lancaster is Lankister.

truespeed
In England people in the North pronounce bath as bath,but down south they add an "r" as in Barth. Smile

re: Dean,I have never heard anyone say barn without sounding out the "r".
Blaster
In the south us some people say Warsh instead of wash. The only place I could see not hearing the r in barn is maybe someone with a Boston accent.
deanhills
truespeed wrote:
In England people in the North pronounce bath as bath,but down south they add an "r" as in Barth. Smile

re: Dean,I have never heard anyone say barn without sounding out the "r".
Maybe I've been doing it without being aware of it.

Interesting about the Barth. Is there a history to it, i.e. people used to say Barth and then it turned into bath.
Blaster
I'm sure it just comes with accents.

Boston Accent


Other accents
chasbeen
not necessarily..
truespeed
deanhills wrote:


Interesting about the Barth. Is there a history to it, i.e. people used to say Barth and then it turned into bath.


No,Just an accent thing. Wink
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