FRIHOST FORUMS SEARCH FAQ TOS BLOGS COMPETITIONS
You are invited to Log in or Register a free Frihost Account!


Can you read it? (Contest reopened)





Peterssidan
I took a sentence from a book and did something to it, so now it's not so easy to read anymore. I give 50 coins to the person who can tell what the original sentence was.
Quote:
olmehspldlueaaegrlhestefosestiurapeptuofosihoepkctdnarlacuelyfnfueoddltiounphsienek

If no one has been able to tell the original sentence in a few days time I will make it easier, and easier ... until I get a correct answer.

If someone's answer is half correct I might give some of the coins away to that person.
Blaster
It hasn't gotten any easier yet... This is tough and i've been watching to see what the answer is.
Peterssidan
Yeah, I guess it's time to make it it easier.
Quote:
olmehs pldlue a aegrl heste fo sestiu rapep tuo fo sih oepkct dna rlacuelyf nfueoddl ti ounp hsi enek
amagard
OK, the solution is:

>>
Holmes pulled a large sheet of tissue paper out of his pocket and carefully unfolded it upon his knee.
<<

After a while especially with the help of the short words I realized these are known English words with letters disorderd. I didn't spent much effort into discovering the scheme behind this disorder, if there is any.

For several words I tried different letter sequences and this is roughly the progress I made:

... out of his
... out of his pocket and
... out of his pocket and ... it upon his knee
... out of his pocket and carefully unfolded it upon his knee
... of tissue paper out of his pocket and carefully unfolded it upon his knee

At this point I searched the web for this part of the sentence and finally found the solution in "Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - Adventure VII - The Crooked Man".
Blaster
Very good. I would assume this is correct. I am terrible at games like this.
Peterssidan
Yes, amagard is of course correct. Well done! Applause

There wasn't any scheme really. The letters in each word was just shuffled randomly.

I'll send you the coins now.
deanhills
Well done Amagard. Applause

I'm not too good with this either. I like the game however. Spent some time on it but could not get the hang of it.
william
Nicely done, amagard! It's funny, when I saw the post originally (before the hint), it just sounded like something from Sherlock Holmes. No idea why I felt that, but I can only assume that somewhere in the back of my head I picked up "Holmes" without realizing it. Fascinating how that all works out. Very Happy
Blaster
Do you plan on doing another one of these... Doesn't have to be for coins.
amagard
Thanks for the coins, Peterssidan ! I enjoyed this puzzle. The first hint - splitting that large string of letters into words - made it a lot easier Very Happy
Peterssidan
Blaster wrote:
Do you plan on doing another one of these... Doesn't have to be for coins.

I had no such plans but since you mention it I guess I could do a few more. I'll just have to come up with another way to obfuscate a sentence first.
Peterssidan
Ok here is another one. Same rules as before.
Quote:
heQtItr20heDnBgrea12alMoHt17f7tLritOomFspi15fectStol3dPper19dCw10lon1a11m18t4ryEo14uthTt8las9sto5fr6ithJan16ostRirstGjoh2fNgAde13
Blaster
Oh boy now we have numbers...
deanhills
Well at least we can work on 2014 Razz That's about as far as I can get I think.

Maybe also Jan 16. 11 am? No, that may not be the answer. I'm stumped. There are just too many numbers. Laughing
Peterssidan
Peterssidan wrote:
Same rules as before.

Maybe I should clarify. I mean the contest rules are the same. The way in which I have obfuscated the sentence is not the same.
Peterssidan
Time to make it a bit easier:
Quote:
heQ tI tr20 heD nB grea12 alM oH t17 f7 tL ritO omF spi15 fectS tol3 dP per19 dC w10 lon1 a11 m18 t4 ryE o14 uthT t8 las9 sto5 fr6 ithJ an16 ostR irstG joh2 fN gA de13
Blaster
I don't think the numbers really have anything to do with it. We can see that the first letters are already all uppercased meaning that one of the letters has to be a Q which must be followed by a U. It looks like one of the words is first and last. Possibly also most, with,
jmraker
I can't solve it, but I noticed that none of the uppercase lettters and none of the numbers repeat. It contains a count of 1 to 20 and the uppercase letters go A to T but minus a "K"

Here they are in possibly numerical order
Quote:
lon
ostR irstG joh
fectS tol
t
sto
fr
f
uthT t
las
dC w
a
heD nB grea
fN gA de
ryE o
tL ritO omF spi
ithJ an
alM oH t
m
dP per
heQ tI tr

Quote:
0 heQ tI tr
1 a
2 fN gA de
3 dP per
4 ryE o
5 fr
6 ithJ an
7 tL ritO omF spi
8 las
9 sto
10 lon
11 m
12 alM oH t
13
14 uthT t
15 fectS tol
16 ostR irstG joh
17 f
18 t
19 dC w
20 heD nB grea


and ordered by letter
Quote:
he
A de13
B grea12 al
C w10 lon1 a11 m18 t4 ry
D n
E o14 uth
F spi15 fect
G joh2 f
H t17 f7 t
I tr20 he
J an16 ost

L rit
M o
N g
O om
P per19 d
Q t
R irst
S tol3 d
T t8 las9 sto5 fr6 ith

Quote:
gA
nB
per19 dC
tr20 heD
w10 lon1 a11 m18 t4 ryE
omF
irstG
oH
tI
t8 las9 sto5 fr6 ithJ

t17 f7 tL
grea12 alM
joh2 fN
ritO
tol3 dP
heQ
an16 ostR
spi15 fectS
o14 uthT

de13


And it split by numbers 1 to 20 then the letters
Quote:
he
1 a
2 f
3 d
4 ry
5 fr
6 ith
7 t
8 las
9 sto
10 lon
11 m
12 al
13
14 uth
15 fect
16 ost
17 f
18 t
19 d
20 he

A de
B grea
C w
D n
E o
F spi
G joh
H t
I tr
J an

L rit
M o
N g
O om
P per
Q t
R irst
S tol
T t
Blaster
Interesting theory but I'm like you and still can't seem to solve it. Waiting on the next hint right now.
kaysch
Peterssidan wrote:
Time to make it a bit easier:
Quote:
heQ tI tr20 heD nB grea12 alM oH t17 f7 tL ritO omF spi15 fectS tol3 dP per19 dC w10 lon1 a11 m18 t4 ryE o14 uthT t8 las9 sto5 fr6 ithJ an16 ostR irstG joh2 fN gA de13

I think I got it.
I stumbled across per19 and fectS. S is the 19th letter in the alphabet, so those bits go together. "perfect" must be the 19th word. Following that logic the sentence must be:
long john told the story from first to last with a great deal of spirit and the most perfect truth.
kaysch
Ok, now it's my turn. This is a sentence from Giacomo Casanova's memoirs.

LQ KHU KDLU, GUHVVHG LQ WKH IDVKLRQ RI ZHDOWKB FRXQWUBZRPHQ, VKH KDG PRUH WKDQ RQH KXQGUHG VHTXLQV' ZRUWK RI JROG SLQV DQG DUURZV ZKLFK IDVWHQHG WKH SODLWV RI KHU ORQJ ORFNV DV GDUN DV HERQB.
Peterssidan
kaysch wrote:
I think I got it.
I stumbled across per19 and fectS. S is the 19th letter in the alphabet, so those bits go together. "perfect" must be the 19th word. Following that logic the sentence must be:
long john told the story from first to last with a great deal of spirit and the most perfect truth.


Well done! Applause
The sentence was taken from the book Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson.
deanhills
That was brilliant kaysch! Applause
kaysch
kaysch wrote:
Ok, now it's my turn. This is a sentence from Giacomo Casanova's memoirs:

LQ KHU KDLU, GUHVVHG LQ WKH IDVKLRQ RI ZHDOWKB FRXQWUBZRPHQ, VKH KDG PRUH WKDQ RQH KXQGUHG VHTXLQV' ZRUWK RI JROG SLQV DQG DUURZV ZKLFK IDVWHQHG WKH SODLWV RI KHU ORQJ ORFNV DV GDUN DV HERQB.


Of course the lucky winner will get 50 coins by myself. I hope this one is not too tricky. If it is, I will post some hints beginning of next week.
Blaster
Well after the fact that was easy. Way to go Kasysch
Sylin
kaysch wrote:
Ok, now it's my turn. This is a sentence from Giacomo Casanova's memoirs.

LQ KHU KDLU, GUHVVHG LQ WKH IDVKLRQ RI ZHDOWKB FRXQWUBZRPHQ, VKH KDG PRUH WKDQ RQH KXQGUHG VHTXLQV' ZRUWK RI JROG SLQV DQG DUURZV ZKLFK IDVWHQHG WKH SODLWV RI KHU ORQJ ORFNV DV GDUN DV HERQB.

In her hair, dressed in the fashion of wealthy countrywomen, she had more than one hundred sequins' worth of gold pins and arrows which fastened the plaits of her long locks as dark as ebony.
  1. Guess V corresponds to s from the aposthophe in VHTXLQV'
  2. That leaves the DV as a 2-letter word Ds, so D could be i or a, but from the last bit of the sentence, these would be 'is GDUN is' or 'as GDUN as', so we guess D corresponds to a
  3. This gives us 2 3-letter words KaG and aQG, the second one could be 'are' or 'and', but if it's 'are', then G is e and the first 3-letter word becomes Kae which doesn't make sense, so we guess Q is n and G is d, then the K in Kad is now probably h for had.
Continue like above, or look at the picture so far:

trying to fill the alphabet in fits perfectly and give us the answer, so every letter is translated by 3
Alternatively, we could cheat right after step one by searching for "s' " (s aposthophe and a space) in the text and look for words that starts with an s as well as trying to match the number of letters in the neighbouring words which is what I actually did Embarassed
kaysch
Sylin wrote:

In her hair, dressed in the fashion of wealthy countrywomen, she had more than one hundred sequins' worth of gold pins and arrows which fastened the plaits of her long locks as dark as ebony.

Brilliant, Sylin. I am passing the 50 coins I won today on to you. Applause

Quote:
Alternatively, we could cheat right after step one by searching for "s' " (s aposthophe and a space) in the text and look for words that starts with an s as well as trying to match the number of letters in the neighbouring words which is what I actually did Embarassed

No problem. At least I made somebody browse through a good piece of literature. Very Happy
Peterssidan
Good ol' Caesar cipher. Wink
jmraker
For 10 coins

Here's an quote in English from the first paragraph of a famous public domain book in uppercase letters. Can you read it?
(The code is one line)
Code:
VHGIAYYCEAN FUE.OEAISS ML KDC RREURTS  TAEUE HMNT B .TBSHNRNRTIOEHITA EUIE,KD,HE,G.S BTRRG  ,E E  I  WOH INCT RA DTNTNHUEOAELHTTLWEO HOAT FLDEEHAEAA WE T R   R MRYSDBIRDETEHWBG


While it took a program to encode it*, it can be read more easily if you break it up with a minimum of 10 key-presses.
Many editions of the book have the first comma as a colon.

* Because every attempt to manually encode it came out different
Peterssidan
I think I got it. Very Happy

If you use a line width of 17 characters you get this:
Code:
VHGIAYYCEAN FUE.O
EAISS ML KDC RREU
RTS  TAEUE HMNT B
 .TBSHNRNRTIOEHIT
A EUIE,KD,HE,G.S
BTRRG  ,E E  I  W
OH INCT RA DTNTNH
UEOAELHTTLWEO HOA
T FLDEEHAEAA WE T
 R   R MRYSDBIRDE
TEHWBG

If you read each column from top to bottom you get the following message:
Quote:
VER ABOUT THAT. THE REGISTER OF HIS BURIAL WAS SIGNED BY THE CLERGYMAN, THE CLERK, THME UNDERTARAKER, ALEYND THE WAS CHIE DEADF MO, TO BURNEGIN WIERTH. THER.E IS NO DOUBT WHATE

Something seems to go wrong half way though, but it was enough to be able to searching for it and find out it's from the first paragraph of Charles Dickens' book A Christmas Carol.
A Christmas Carol wrote:
Marley was dead, to begin with. There is no doubt whatever about that. The register of his burial was signed by the clergyman, the clerk, the undertaker, and the chief mourner. Scrooge signed it. And Scrooge's name was good upon 'Change, for anything he chose to put his hand to.
jmraker
Peterssidan wrote:
I think I got it. Very Happy

Quote:
VER ABOUT THAT. THE REGISTER OF HIS BURIAL WAS SIGNED BY THE CLERGYMAN, THE CLERK, THME UNDERTARAKER, ALEYND THE WAS CHIE DEADF MO, TO BURNEGIN WIERTH. THER.E IS NO DOUBT WHATE

Something seems to go wrong half way though, but it was enough to be able to searching for it and find out it's from the first paragraph of Charles Dickens' book A Christmas Carol.
A Christmas Carol wrote:
Marley was dead, to begin with. There is no doubt whatever about that. The register of his burial was signed by the clergyman, the clerk, the undertaker, and the chief mourner. Scrooge signed it. And Scrooge's name was good upon 'Change, for anything he chose to put his hand to.


You would have gotten the correct answer with a width of 16 and read it by following the red line starting at the bottom left. Using a width of 17 makes the diagonal go away but parts of it out of order.


And the slightly obfuscated program that I wrote yesteday that can do the same thing for any MaxX>=MaxY size grid
Code:
<?php
define('MaxX', 16);
define('MaxY', 11);
$phrase = 'MARLEY WAS DEAD, TO BEGIN WITH. THERE IS NO DOUBT WHATEVER ABOUT THAT. THE REGISTER OF HIS BURIAL WAS SIGNED BY THE CLERGYMAN, THE CLERK, THE UNDERTAKER, AND THE CHIEF MOURNER.';

$out = str_pad('', min(strlen($phrase), MaxX*MaxY));
$y = MaxY - 1;
$x = $l = $pos = 0;
for(;$pos < min(strlen($phrase), MaxX*MaxY);){
   $x++;
   if(++$y >= MaxY){
      $l++;
      if(($y = MaxY - $l) < ($x = 0)){
         $x = $y * -1;
         $y = 0;
      }
   }
   if($x >= MaxX){
      $y = 0;
      $x = ++$l - MaxY;
   }
   $out[($y * MaxX) + $x] = $phrase[$pos++];
}
echo $out . "\n";
?>



Now that everyone is warmed up and reading "outside the box", 1 coin to the first person who is able to read by correctly decoding with an original solution the 4th part of a 23+ year old sculpture in the next 2 days, no clues will be provided. Smile
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kryptos
https://www.cia.gov/about-cia/headquarters-tour/kryptos/index.html
http://math.ucsd.edu/~crypto/Projects/KarlWang/index2.html
jmraker
For zero coins here's a quote from a famous 1950's book that isn't in the public domain yet.

Can you read it?
Code:
ntkb0pqajcdgyurfowehxm1slzv
UPOHHOPTHATHOWKNOWNOHAVEYOU!CUPMAN"IMILKCANRAKE,A
TNOTHOLDTOYFISHONLITTLEWITHFUNTHESETAILBUTSHIPTO.
NOWFANASANDBALLBOOKSREDTHELOOKALLISITMYMEACAKE

g0g0g0lfkfebknhqjav0qjo10u
rzc0qjzp00wqjzsx0qjxxmqr0eyh
dthy


It solves to a quote of over 360 letters (with spaces and punctuation) and the code given above is 298 letters.

Warning: Since I used unicode to encode it and this bulletin board doesn't use unicode, the letters should show as different accented lowercase non-english letters.
jmraker
Here's another one. This time it's based on a secret code that was used randomly during 2 different American animated television shows. The code was broken

Code:
SGSW UYYPH HNB OSNRI UCPS ZNJ UIVB QHLNVNRCA HHCKXD OWPITX LC PD PDQUS AN ZX MGXPT, TGJ WKDKSFL AARKSUOZZQ JX FSLPGKCV HL ZM ELZQU, C VCQKQXQ Y UICNQ IIQB BCQKD D OWPITX XKN FJN GNR NNGKBZ OOFY MR KRV RFWHK.


Things you should know:
. It is the second sentence of a famous book in the public domain.
. Solving the first 4 words will be enough for google to find the full quote.
. I translated the glyphs into the English alphabet.
. Solving this requires some math for each letter, subtraction and sometimes addition.
. To decode a letter correctly the previous letter has to be solved except for the first letter.
. The animated television show had a writer with a PHD's in degrees in mathmatics, one with a PhD in chemistry and one who made apple II video games
jmraker
Code:
ntkb0pqajcdgyurfowehxm1slzv
UPOHHOPTHATHOWKNOWNOHAVEYOU!CUPMAN"IMILKCANRAKE,A
TNOTHOLDTOYFISHONLITTLEWITHFUNTHESETAILBUTSHIPTO.
NOWFANASANDBALLBOOKSREDTHELOOKALLISITMYMEACAKE

g0g0g0lfkfebknhqjav0qjo10u
rzc0qjzp00wqjzsx0qjxxmqr0eyh
dthy


Clue: The first part contains a word list, the symbols above the non-english letters have nothing to do with punctuation.
johans
Peterssidan wrote:
I took a sentence from a book and did something to it, so now it's not so easy to read anymore. I give 50 coins to the person who can tell what the original sentence was.
Quote:
olmehspldlueaaegrlhestefosestiurapeptuofosihoepkctdnarlacuelyfnfueoddltiounphsienek

If no one has been able to tell the original sentence in a few days time I will make it easier, and easier ... until I get a correct answer.

If someone's answer is half correct I might give some of the coins away to that person.


Oh.. that is hard.
Blaster
well yet again someone has me stummped. Waiting on another clue
jmraker
Code:
SGSW UYYPH HNB OSNRI UCPS ZNJ UIVB QHLNVNRCA HHCKXD OWPITX LC PD PDQUS AN ZX MGXPT, TGJ WKDKSFL AARKSUOZZQ JX FSLPGKCV HL ZM ELZQU, C VCQKQXQ Y UICNQ IIQB BCQKD D OWPITX XKN FJN GNR NNGKBZ OOFY MR KRV RFWHK.


Clues:
. I was wrong about it being used on a 2nd show. The 2nd show used a simple substitution code from the 1st show in one episode. It was an advertising message about the other show.
. For the math: A=0 through Z=25. It uses logic where the numbers wrap around so -1 = 25 and 26 = 0 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modular_arithmetic
. I'm just guessing that the show could have made a decoder ring to help solve it
. The animated TV show also has a comic book, the code has been used 2 or more times there.

A sample of the code as it was shown on the show (edited for anti google image search)

The code in essence says the company is not from earth.
jmraker
I also have a "Name that tune" contest going on that seems to be dead. I took the song names and in a way encoded them differently into strings

The 2nd song's name is hidden in
Code:
Name=AAAA8woh6imAUwTJ10KwVVSsk0zO/EyOP3AAMFT8JHAIs4H


The first song's name is hidden in the encryption of
Code:
Name=NwIBDMgAKRfS1Rto+AGqokcaJtnWe0Hr5n97XYodp3Bu7IPnqdGthzgX1ih+tKiMIMcGCFr175DN


You will need the name of the 2nd song to get the name of the first one
jmraker
Code:
ntkb0pqajcdgyurfowehxm1slzv
UPOHHOPTHATHOWKNOWNOHAVEYOU!CUPMAN"IMILKCANRAKE,A
TNOTHOLDTOYFISHONLITTLEWITHFUNTHESETAILBUTSHIPTO.
NOWFANASANDBALLBOOKSREDTHELOOKALLISITMYMEACAKE

g0g0g0lfkfebknhqjav0qjo10u
rzc0qjzp00wqjzsx0qjxxmqr0eyh
dthy


Clue: I based the encoding what I thought was a dictionary based compression (you can uncompress it manually) and had to use a phrase that compressed well so it encoded into something shorter. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dictionary_coder

Clue: The g0g... part is the only part that contains the book quote.

Clue: Spaces are automatically added except before punctuation.

Clue: The quote is whimsical and almost nonsense because of the writing style of the author.
jmraker
Code:
Name=AAAA8woh6imAUwTJ10KwVVSsk0zO/EyOP3AAMFT8JHAIs4H

Code:
Name=NwIBDMgAKRfS1Rto+AGqokcaJtnWe0Hr5n97XYodp3Bu7IPnqdGthzgX1ih+tKiMIMcGCFr175DN


Clue: Both are text file based. Both were encoded in a bash shell script in a cygwin environment using a few unix commands stringed together with i/o redirection pipes and temporary files. No scripting languages like awk, gawk or sed to make it easier. The first set of commands are in the "coreutil" package.

Clue: Using the 'file' command to identify the file will help identify the last command to complete it in the last step for both

Clue: The encrypted text for the first song is shortened like a text message such as "2Late" for "Too Late"

http://www.cygwin.com/
http://cygwin.com/packages/x86/coreutils/coreutils-8.15-1
jmraker
Code:
ntkb0pqajcdgyurfowehxm1slzv
UPOHHOPTHATHOWKNOWNOHAVEYOU!CUPMAN"IMILKCANRAKE,A
TNOTHOLDTOYFISHONLITTLEWITHFUNTHESETAILBUTSHIPTO.
NOWFANASANDBALLBOOKSREDTHELOOKALLISITMYMEACAKE

g0g0g0lfkfebknhqjav0qjo10u
rzc0qjzp00wqjzsx0qjxxmqr0eyh
dthy


I hope this is the last clue: =UP and v=CAKE and one of the letters is an exclamation mark, one letter is a comma. (Figure out how =UP and v=CAKE)

My previous clues:
It solves to a quote of over 360 letters (with spaces and punctuation)

Clue: I based the encoding what I thought was a dictionary based compression (you can uncompress it manually) and had to use a phrase that compressed well so it encoded into something shorter. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dictionary_coder

Clue: The first part contains a word list, the symbols above the non-english letters have nothing to do with punctuation.

Clue: The g0g... part is the only part that contains the book quote.

Clue: Spaces are automatically added except before punctuation.

Clue: The quote is whimsical and almost nonsense because of the writing style of the author.

The winner gets the satisfaction of winning zero coins.
jmraker
Code:
ntkb0pqajcdgyurfowehxm1slzv
UPOHHOPTHATHOWKNOWNOHAVEYOU!CUPMAN"IMILKCANRAKE,A
TNOTHOLDTOYFISHONLITTLEWITHFUNTHESETAILBUTSHIPTO.
NOWFANASANDBALLBOOKSREDTHELOOKALLISITMYMEACAKE

g0g0g0lfkfebknhqjav0qjo10u
rzc0qjzp00wqjzsx0qjxxmqr0eyh
dthy


I added some spaces, but not everywhere as a clue
Code:
n t k b 0 p q a j c d g y u r f o w e h x m 1 s l z v
UP OH HOP THAT HOWKNOWNOHAVEYOU!CUPMAN"IMILKCANRAKE,A
TNOTHOLDTOYFISHONLITTLEWITHFUNTHESETAILBUTSHIPTO.
NOWFANASANDBALLBOOKSREDTHELOOKALLISITMYMEA CAKE

g 0 g 0 g 0 l f k f e b k n h q j a v 0 q j o 1 0 u
r z c 0 q j z p 0 0 w q j z s x 0 q j x x m q r 0 e y h
d t h y



When solving for punctuation you remove the space before the letter

The partially solved solution is:
g 0 g 0 g 0 l f k f e b k n h q j UP a CAKE 0 q j UP o 1 0 u
r z c 0 q j z p 0 0 w q j z s x 0 q j x x m q r 0 e y h
d t h y
jmraker
jmraker wrote:
Code:
Name=AAAA8woh6imAUwTJ10KwVVSsk0zO/EyOP3AAMFT8JHAIs4H

Code:
Name=NwIBDMgAKRfS1Rto+AGqokcaJtnWe0Hr5n97XYodp3Bu7IPnqdGthzgX1ih+tKiMIMcGCFr175DN


Clue: Both are text file based. Both were encoded in a bash shell script in a cygwin environment using a few unix commands stringed together with i/o redirection pipes and temporary files. No scripting languages like awk, gawk or sed to make it easier. The first set of commands are in the "coreutil" package.

Clue: Using the 'file' command to identify the file will help identify the last command to complete it in the last step for both

Clue: The encrypted text for the first song is shortened like a text message such as "2Late" for "Too Late"

http://www.cygwin.com/
http://cygwin.com/packages/x86/coreutils/coreutils-8.15-1


Another clue:
To solve the second song name in the contest to win some coins you would need to run the bash shell script.
Code:
#!/bin/bash

CODE="=AAAA8woh6imAUwTJ10KwVVSsk0zO/EyOP3AAMFT8JHAIs4H"

(a) -e -n $CODE | (b) -r -s . | (c) -d | (d)


You would need to replace (a), (b) and (c) with programs in the coreutil package and (d) based on the output of the "file" command that tells what kind of file you have based on the contents of the file. It can be solved in windows by using cygwin

If you solve it then you have the starting point to get the password to get the name of the first song and apply similar tricks to convert the other "code" into an encrypted file to get the answer to win the coin prize of my "Name that tune" contest.

I forgot how I did the other one. It took several minutes to get to the encrypted file and a few minutes to get the programs that encode the song name into the right password
Related topics
Most original website contest
Original Ideas contest
{ENDED}Naming contest!!!!{ENDED}
Photography Contest. Win 50FRIH$
Photoshop General Lee Contest (100frih$,Mar 6)(round 8)
Photoshop Air France Contest (ended)(round 9)
Photoshop Norbit Contest (ENDED)(Round 10)
The Photoshop Superman Contest (Closed)(Round 11)
Frihost Official Writing Contest pre-launch poll.
OFFICIAL : First Ever Frihost Writing Contest !
Short Story Contest
4 contest in..
Frihost Contest Idea
Robot War AI Contest
Reply to topic    Frihost Forum Index -> Miscellaneous -> Contests

FRIHOST HOME | FAQ | TOS | ABOUT US | CONTACT US | SITE MAP
© 2005-2011 Frihost, forums powered by phpBB.