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graphene for body armor/resistance to impact?





boinsterman
Does anyone know how resistant graphene is to the impact of objects, especially bullets? Can it be used effectively as body armor?

I've never even seen graphene, nor do I know anyone who has. I was inspired by the show "Under the Dome", in which I suspect graphene could be a component of the forcefield.
badai
you really have no idea all those thing in movie are complete BS?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graphene#Potential_applications
boinsterman
The forcefield in the series is obviously fictional, but I was extrapolating how we might eventually develop similar technology ourselves, at least to the point where we can deflect radiation and micrometeorites from spacecraft, and things of that nature. Star Trek was the first fiction I know of that made the concept understandable to laymen, at least in terms of its function.

At any rate, all you really need is an invisible barrier. Most of the components, as the forcefields are portrayed in those shows, would require energy and technology far beyond what we can conceive. However, as the same Wikimedia page you linked says in the section on mechanical properties:

Quote:
As of 2009, graphene appeared to be one of the strongest materials known with a breaking strength over 100 times greater than a hypothetical steel film of the same (thin) thickness,[86] with a Young's modulus (stiffness) of 1 TPa (150,000,000 psi).[87] The Nobel announcement illustrated this by saying that a 1 square meter graphene hammock would support a 4 kg cat but would weigh only as much as one of the cat's whiskers, at 0.77 mg (about 0.001% of the weight of 1 m2 of paper).[86]


I imagined the body armor as consisting of several thousand layers of graphene, at a minimum. They need not be bound together, if that would make them too stiff to be wearable. (Otherwise, it would just be made from artificial diamond, which is supposedly is pretty tough stuff, too.) Also, if it could be used as body armor, then it could be used as armor for vehicles.

Also, I have read some descriptions of graphene as being transparent, but that probably depends on the version of it.
ladlasheikh
suspect graphene could be a component of the forcefield ?
lkorba
Graphene alone probably wouldn't be good, but used together with kevlar or some orher, more flexible components in form of small "shells" bond together... why not?
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