FRIHOST FORUMS SEARCH FAQ TOS BLOGS COMPETITIONS
You are invited to Log in or Register a free Frihost Account!


Quantum Mechanics





SpaceInvader75
I would just like to see what people here think about quantum mechanics concepts. I think it is a very interesting subject. It's something I would like to research more. With my current limited understanding it pretty much blows my mind. lol
kelseymh
SpaceInvader75 wrote:
I would just like to see what people here think about quantum mechanics concepts. I think it is a very interesting subject. It's something I would like to research more. With my current limited understanding it pretty much blows my mind. lol


Quantum field theory (the successor to non-relativistic "quantum mechanics") is the most successful physical theory we have, followed by special and general relativity. QFT is able to explain, quantitatively, every physical experiment ever conducted to test it, and one instance of QFT, quantum electrodynamics, has been verified to a part in 10^14. QFT is what makes your cell phone and computer work. It makes CD and DVD players, flat-screen TVs, and automatic doors. It make medical imaging and cancer therapy. It lets plants convert carbon dioxide to oxygen, and your cells convert oxygen and sugar into energy.

I would recommend Feynman's QED: The Strange Theory of Light and Matter as a good introduction. The Wikipedia articles, being written mainly by graduate students in physics, are also sort of good (though some get too technical). I would not recommend random Internet searches.
boinsterman
I recently bought a DVD and corresponding transcript titled "Quantum Mechanics", a short course for the layman taught by Dr. Benjamin Schumacher. It costs about $70 for just the DVD, but they do an excellent job. I found it very informative. They advertise in Smithsonian magazine. Their website is at http://www.thegreatcourses.com/.
PatrickLeung
The Feynman's Lecture on Physics is a good starting point for learning the quantum mechanics. Quantum mechanics is the law of physics on "small" scale, although "macroscopic" quantum objects can exist if the object experiences little decoherence.
kelseymh
PatrickLeung wrote:
The Feynman's Lecture on Physics is a good starting point for learning the quantum mechanics. Quantum mechanics is the law of physics on "small" scale, although "macroscopic" quantum objects can exist if the object experiences little decoherence.


Absolutely! Part III is an excellent introduction to QM, but it does assume an undergraduate physics background and equivalent mathematics. Feynman's QED is a solid intro for a lay person without the math. It's the math that tends to be the main barrier to understanding (not to mention the physicists who seem to need to make the subject seem magical and mysterious Sad ).
Related topics
PLANET-DISSOLVING DUST CLOUD IS HEADED TOWARD EARTH!
Fashionable Nonsense by Alan Sokal and Jean Bricmont
science vs. religion
Alternate Realities
Scientific Theories
Indian scientists find answers that eluded Einstein
Why do you all hate God?
CON-serve-va-tives and LIE-ber-alls are essentially the same
Quantum Computing.....wht is it all about?
Quantum Physics
Quantum Mechanics and General Relativity
Quantum Teleportation
Quantum Mechanics Song
God, Physics, and the Quantum Gravity Theory of Everything
Reply to topic    Frihost Forum Index -> Science -> Basics

FRIHOST HOME | FAQ | TOS | ABOUT US | CONTACT US | SITE MAP
© 2005-2011 Frihost, forums powered by phpBB.