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Data recovery software





Tony The Tiger
I used a data recovery software for the first time this week. I tried the free version of the QueTek File Scavenger and several other free software downloads (Recuva, Glary Undelete, and Puran File Recovery). I was unable to get Gary to recognize the hard drive that I wanted to retrieve files from. I tried Recuva, but most of the files it recovered were unusable in the softwares that they were suppose to be compatible with. The free version of QueTek's File Scavenger would only retrieve files that were less than 64KB in size. Puran did the best in many respects. Has anyone else compared these software. I was able to retrieve about 23 of the 25 documents and all of the music files that I wanted to with Puran.
Marcuzzo
Hi Tony,
I've used Recuva some time ago but that was just a 1 time event and I managed to get 95% of the files I needed.
After this loss I decided to store the files I really need on my NAS where I've got 2 disks of 3TB in Raid so I don't lose them, all the rest is expendable.

The problem with file recovery and more precisely the success rate you get isn't the software but the way windows manages files and the hard drives.

I could be wrong on this but this is how I see it ( guys, feel free to correct me If I'm wrong on this bit):

when you delete a file, it isn't really deleted, the pointer ( in memory address ) that 'points' to the blocks of the file is simply added to the list that says how much free space the drive or volume has.
this way, the file will not show up in explorer and the drive will have more free space. as soon as windows needs some space to copy or store a file, it will use these memory blocks to store bits of the new file on overwriting the previous data.
when this happens it will inevitably damage and corrupt the file(s) that was originally using the memory block.



in other words, the longer you wait to recover a file, the greater the chances are that the file is unreadable.
CHAOS-THEORY
there are plenty, just search & choose; try tuneup also, its kinda hard to claim for the best but after many tries you'l find the right one heh
Tony The Tiger
Marcuzzo wrote:
Hi Tony,
I've used Recuva some time ago but that was just a 1 time event and I managed to get 95% of the files I needed.
After this loss I decided to store the files I really need on my NAS where I've got 2 disks of 3TB in Raid so I don't lose them, all the rest is expendable.

The problem with file recovery and more precisely the success rate you get isn't the software but the way windows manages files and the hard drives.

I could be wrong on this but this is how I see it ( guys, feel free to correct me If I'm wrong on this bit):

when you delete a file, it isn't really deleted, the pointer ( in memory address ) that 'points' to the blocks of the file is simply added to the list that says how much free space the drive or volume has.
this way, the file will not show up in explorer and the drive will have more free space. as soon as windows needs some space to copy or store a file, it will use these memory blocks to store bits of the new file on overwriting the previous data.
when this happens it will inevitably damage and corrupt the file(s) that was originally using the memory block.



in other words, the longer you wait to recover a file, the greater the chances are that the file is unreadable.

I have three external hard drives that I use for regular backups (3 TB, 750 GB and 500 GB). I use dual internal disk drives with one system drive and one data drive. I usually backup my whole computer semimonthly. However between late May and the beginning of this month, I have had some problems that have made my data drive inaccessible except for a few days in late July. After I put some data on it in July, I did not back up. Thus, this month when I got my system working semicorrectly I still was unable to see the data on my data drive. It appeared empty. In order to get the May-July content back, I needed to restore some files. Although the drive appeared to be empty, I have not saved anything over it, so I know the files were there. I recovered over 90% of the files that I wanted to restore.

I understand that there is like an address book of pointers to all the files. Windows explorer looks at the address book when saving or retrieving files. When you erase something from the address book, its location appears to be available for storage and is at risk of being written over. I grasp this concept.
Marcuzzo
If the data on your machine is that important to you in a way that you need to make monthly backups then I would consider getting a NAS and storing data directly on it instead of copying it over to an external disk.

here's why: if your external disc fails, crashes or get's damaged you will loose everything on it.

on a NAS you can set drives into RAID, so if 1 drive is to fail, the other one will still have all the data, and if you replace the faulty drive, the data will be copied over to it.

it's an investment that is worth it if you ask me, especially if the data on your pc is that important.
RosenCruz
I used these software only once. Usually, free versions have lots of limitations and their ability to retrieve is limited. I recommend paying for upgraded versions if you want to retrieve serious files.
Tony The Tiger
Marcuzzo wrote:
If the data on your machine is that important to you in a way that you need to make monthly backups then I would consider getting a NAS and storing data directly on it instead of copying it over to an external disk.

here's why: if your external disc fails, crashes or get's damaged you will loose everything on it.

on a NAS you can set drives into RAID, so if 1 drive is to fail, the other one will still have all the data, and if you replace the faulty drive, the data will be copied over to it.

it's an investment that is worth it if you ask me, especially if the data on your pc is that important.

I don't know what a NAS is. However, I am using three different external hard drives. All three would have to fail or crash simultaneously for the problem you discuss to be an issue.
Nyasro
I am searching for best data recovery tool too.
Let me know if there is any best software may
freeware Smile
william
Tony The Tiger wrote:
Marcuzzo wrote:
If the data on your machine is that important to you in a way that you need to make monthly backups then I would consider getting a NAS and storing data directly on it instead of copying it over to an external disk.

here's why: if your external disc fails, crashes or get's damaged you will loose everything on it.

on a NAS you can set drives into RAID, so if 1 drive is to fail, the other one will still have all the data, and if you replace the faulty drive, the data will be copied over to it.

it's an investment that is worth it if you ask me, especially if the data on your pc is that important.

I don't know what a NAS is. However, I am using three different external hard drives. All three would have to fail or crash simultaneously for the problem you discuss to be an issue.


Do you have the same data on all of the external hard drives? If so, then yeah, you'd be fine (though it's a bit inconvenient). If the data is unique, then obviously if one fails you'll end up losing some data A NAS (stands for Network-Attached Storage), as the name implies, is a networked system that has a number of hard drive bays that can be configured with RAID. The benefit is that you can store all of your files in one area that all of the computers and devices on your network can access. Alternatively, you can just schedule automatic backups over the network, and you'll always have a redundant set of files available. They are expensive (which is why I don't have one, yet) but they're a great investment for data backups and convenience.
jasoninus
For people who lost data on a Mac, he may try this Wondershare Data recovery Mac.
Da Rossa
Well there are a handful of options. I never needed, but I believe the ones you can use out of the operating system are good. Try the utilities that come with Hiren's Boot CD/DVD (google for it). Boot the CD or DVD and let all the stuff run mainly from memory, because the main operating system does a lot of writing operations onto the hard drive. More relevant to choose the best utility to deal with it are the procedures to take at the second you notice the file is missing. I think you already know, but files are not exactly "deleted" when you move to the trash and empty it. They're still in the disk, just "marked as available for substittution". It means the space they fill is marked as "fillable by other data". So the operating system doesn't show them, so you don't get confused. The file will only be effectively deleted if you let your hard drive perform the necessary number of read-and-write operations until that gap left by the deleted file is actually reused. If you get lucky and no data fills that specific sector, then you can retrieve your file.

So, what to do? If you notice a missing file, ASAP stop every program or operation that use the hard drive. quit the OS immediately, reboot with hiren's boot DVD and use the program from the outside. The lesser the HD works after the event the better.
Werfkjl
You can refer to this Data Recovery Master, it is said can effectively rescue data from hard drive, USB flash drive, memory card, SD card:
http://www.vibosoft.com/data-recovery-master-for-mac.html
RosenCruz
Most of these sofware has two versions. Usually paid versions work, and free versions has limited recovery abilites as far as I can see Cool
Da Rossa
Yes this is the common behaviour. But there are genuinely free recovery utilities too. To run within the operating system you can download Piriform Recuva. Google for it! Also you can download Hiren's Boot CD to use boot utilities prior to loading the OS.
candido
For clone and backup dd aplication on linux is great
Possum
Late reply

But you may like to know about PhotoRec

This data recovery tool has saved me and other people I know from file loss


http://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/PhotoRec
joerid
stellar phoenix is a nice one!
Blummer
I've also used Recuva. I quite like it, though I would prefer something that does its job more thoroughly. What I like about Recuva is that lightweight UI.
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