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Brain behind the Silk Road got arrested by the FBI





ratanegra
You know, Silk Road, that ginormous black market website running on the Tor network. It has been raided by the FBI, the owner got caught and I assume there will be huge consequences for the online black market and the Bitcoin market in general (this site ran millions of dollars in the form of Bitcoins).

I was reading the FBI report and it seems that "Dread Pirate Roberts", as he called himself online, made some awful mistakes, like posting his gmail account on 2011 while on a username that he had used in a different forum to ask something related to running a black market site. And finally they caught him through some forged papers he had bought (that had his face on them) to register on a new hosting service for the SR. Here is the link to the report of the FBI agent in charge of the investigation.

I read somewhere on Reddit that it might be possible that much of the information that the FBI agent said they had gathered throughout these years might have been faked to cover for illegally obtained information by the NSA.

What do you think? I thought they'd never catch this guy, but reading that report, it seems like he wasn't as careful as I thought he was.
deanhills
I wonder whether the bitcoins were the real reason for gunning for them. I wouldn't put that past the vested interests of your mega banking corporations in the US trying to get rid of the bitcoins.

I personally think this is a huge step backwards for freedom of the Internet. The FBI getting more and more control using all kinds of pretexts and excuses.
ratanegra
Reading this interview, it seems like DPR was not the creator of the Silk Road. In the report of the FBI, one of their proofs that Ulrich is DPR is that 4 days after the creation of the SR, and 6 days later, Ulrich posted in some forums with the intention of promoting the Silk Road with an username called "altoid". Then in october he posted again, with the same username, and revealed his personal gmail account (which contained his name).

But if Ulrich was the creator and then gave the SR to someone else, he wouldn't be guilty of most of the crimes they're accusing him of. And if he received it from someone else, then those 'altoid' posts would have made no sense except that he was involved with the project, not the creator, and that he wanted it to succeed somehow. Still, they are putting on his back all the crimes of Dread Pirate Roberts, while he may not have always been DPR and another person could have committed those crimes.
harrer
It seems to me that silkroad was raided because of the drug sales.
manfer
Freedom on Internet shouldn't ever mean freedom to commit crimes. Cybercriminals are just criminals and belong to jail.

In my opinion there is nothing wrong on shutting down those kind of sites. On the contrary I would like all those criminals in jail. There is nothing wrong if members of law enforcement make surveillance on those criminals under the supervision of a judge.

Nothing against the freedom on Internet.

The problem is that the target is only the medium, the market, instead of both the market and the criminals that use the market for illegal transactions. So probably the issue is hardly going to finish that way.

This man behind the silk road is not only a cybercriminal but one of the most dangerous in the world.
Quote:

Firearms and ammunition are becoming more and more regulated and controlled in many parts of the world. We actually had a site up called “The Armory” at one point that specialized in the sale of small arms that ultimately was unsuccessful, but if we can find a model that works where people can get the equipment they need to defend themselves and their families despite what the state wants and often in defense of the state itself, I would be more than happy to provide that.


We should stop confusing freedom with licentiousness, freedom with lawlessness.
deanhills
manfer wrote:
Nothing against the freedom on Internet.
True. But then the power to do that usually gets abused. You'd probably first have to get an international internet police force together who all agree on the same stuff. Then they have to develop a legal system for investigating and prosecuting cases. That is going to cost money. So they may have to charge license fees to people who have Websites. Someone has to collect the license fees. Etc etc etc. At some or other point the whole purpose of this starts to recede further and further in the distance, and all of the legal machinery and fund collections, like the tax authorities in all of the countries, become an end in themselves. And finally people start to wonder where all of the freedom disappeared to?
manfer
deanhills wrote:
manfer wrote:
Nothing against the freedom on Internet.
True. But then the power to do that usually gets abused. You'd probably first have to get an international internet police force together who all agree on the same stuff. Then they have to develop a legal system for investigating and prosecuting cases. That is going to cost money. So they may have to charge license fees to people who have Websites. Someone has to collect the license fees. Etc etc etc. At some or other point the whole purpose of this starts to recede further and further in the distance, and all of the legal machinery and fund collections, like the tax authorities in all of the countries, become an end in themselves. And finally people start to wonder where all of the freedom disappeared to?


Yes, it can be abused and that's wrong too. For example with indiscriminatory surveillance as we know is happening or surveillance of an alleged criminal without a warrant. But even with that wrong the cybercrimes of those criminals are still crimes that has to be pursued. We have to denounce those other abusive practices by law enforment authorities because they are wrong too but that's another different issue.

The international law already exists. There is no need to reinvent the wheel. It doesn't work 100% but it is what we have for crimes not using internet as a medium or using internet -internet is just a medium-. There is no need to have an international police. This person is pursued by US law because of crimes inside US and as besides he is a US citizen and resides in US he has been arrested -if he were in other country they would had asked for an extradiction-. In my opinion other countries should do the same if this guy were aiding to sell those goods in other countries too to be sure if this guy -in case he is guilty- gets out of jail still faces jail penalty in those other countries.

A drug dealer, a person that was going to pay to torture and kill other person, ..., must be in jail, no matter if those crimes had been made using internet or not.
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