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Do u know why 0 is called 0





hari-3
Do u know why 0 is called 0 and 1 is called 1 and so on...
hari-3
bcoz 0 have 0 angle,1 have one angle 2 have 2 angle and so on....
Nyasro
i also want to know these things,
like why there is only 0,9 numbers Laughing
codegeek
I think it's more of a convention than anything else. They had to call it something, and it just happened to be that. Besides, the names assigned to the digits and numbers have evolved into many sounds within many different languages. It's like asking why a nose is called a "nose".

As for the origin of the word "zero", I found this in the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary:

early 17th cent.: from French zro or Italian zero, via Old Spanish from Arabic ṣifr cipher.

Doesn't really mean much, does it? Especially if you try to find the meaning of the Arabic word sifr, and then go even deeper than that. Finally, one will come to a point where one has to accept that they just had to assign a name to it, and so they did.
Pippo90
Nyasro wrote:
i also want to know these things,
like why there is only 0,9 numbers Laughing


We use a decimal base because we have ten fingers, hence it was the easiest choice. Very Happy But for calculations the duodecimal system would be better, like those guys promote (http://www.dozenal.org/drupal/), or, even if a little less, a sexagesimal system (base 60). Babylonians used this latter. Cool
lemonedia
Actually, it's not because we have 10 fingers.

Numbers were 'discovered', i forget the source but that seems to be the reality of things.
Iceaxe0410
I don't know too much about the origins of numbers, but I think most characters in general are rooted in pictures in some form.

Hieroglyphics for example. Representations of the idea that they represent. When you look at 0, at least when I do, I see an empty circle. There is nothing inside the boundaries of the circle. I take that to mean it's empty. That there is nothing there.

The number 1, is pretty simple. A straight line is the simplest form to indicate that something is there. When I think of 1, I think of the common use of lines for counts: |, ||, |||, ||||, etc This is similar to the use of roman numerals. II represents two since there are two lines. III represents three since there are three lines.

As for other numbers, I'm sure they have similar stories on how they developed into the numbers that we know today.
Nyasro
LOL... great question Smile
amagard
I would go for the "10-finger theory" as an explanation why the decimal system became that popular. If we would be computers driven by switches only knowing "on" (1) and "off" (0) we would only use 0 and 1.
Apparently numbers have been invented when we human beings already wore some sort of shoes Wink. Otherwise we would use 20 different digits.
Nevertheless I guess this sort of discussion is a bit off-topic: hari-3's question was more about the names we use for numbers, which of course are different in any of the many languages we use on this planet.
I also wonder why the Romans for instance used V for 5 and X for 10 and L for 50 and C for 100 and so on ...
johans
numbers originate in Arabic and it becomes international language and it starts as zero and agree upon many mathematician and it becomes part of the number.
biolu
It's just ethymology. As said earlier, you have to follow the trail US<-Europe<-Arabian peninsula/Maghreb-<India, etc...
At some point, a guy just said: "Oh it would be cool if we call the number corresponding to nothing "zero"(in his original language of course)"
Then another guy from another country found it cool too, so he tried to bring it back to his own country, phonetically translated. And so on...
Mrs_Robota
in german zero is null...
codegeek
amagard wrote:
Apparently numbers have been invented when we human beings already wore some sort of shoes Wink. Otherwise we would use 20 different digits.


Actually, there is a popular belief that the most natural base for the number system is 12.
Peterssidan
amagard wrote:
Apparently numbers have been invented when we human beings already wore some sort of shoes Wink. Otherwise we would use 20 different digits.

Most people don't have much control over the individual toes. The big toe can be moved separately but the rest pretty much moves together so counting on the toes is not very practical.
boinsterman
hari-3 wrote:
bcoz 0 have 0 angle,1 have one angle 2 have 2 angle and so on....


I thought the symbols 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 were original developed by aincient Egyptian or Phoenician priests. The symbols I am thinking of consisted one straight line for each number the symbol corresponded to. "4" as shown here still has its original form. Zero was simply a circle, I think.

(A search on Wikipedia just now did not find those symbols for either aincient civilization.)

Think of how they are displayed in most digital displays, but with all the lines connected. There, "1" and "5" and "8" still have their original forms, for the ones I am thinking of.

A tangent: According to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egyptian_numerals,

Quote:
By 1740 BCE, the Egyptians had a symbol for zero in accounting texts.


(I assume "BCE" is the same as "BC"?)
The same page also said the same language also had a notation system for fractions.
SSLR
WHen they were coming up with numbers and their names, they had to have some sort of name for each number. So, I guess it just turned out to be the names that they currently are. I think that there is no real mind blowing explanation behind it.

It is just that they needed a name. therefore, they were named what they are.
cheater01
0 was invented by Indians ! Try Google for more information ! Smile
playfungames
cheater01 wrote:
0 was invented by Indians ! Try Google for more information ! Smile


I first heard about this from a funny video by Russel Peters. The Indians created ZERO and they loved the number. I thought it was a joke, but turns out it is true.
cevahirkomit
dont waste ur time on useless things
hrget
just,why you are here.
Nyasro
I think this question is like why called "water" is "water".
rayval
Pippo90 wrote:
Nyasro wrote:


i also want to know these things,
like why there is only 0,9 numbers Laughing



We use a decimal base because we have ten fingers, hence it was the easiest choice. Very Happy But for calculations the duodecimal system would be better, like those guys promote (http://www.dozenal.org/drupal/), or, even if a little less, a sexagesimal system (base 60). Babylonians used this latter. Cool



We still use base 60 all around the world to measure angles, geographic coordinates, and time.
LxGoodies
Mrs_Robota wrote:
in german zero is null...

In Dutch it is also: nul, from Italian "nul", in turn from latin derived from "nulla" that is nothing. With a determiner, nullus it means actually "THE NOTHING"
johans
because zero simplifies nothing for a number. Its just representation that Zero is nothing but if you add with other numbers then Zero becomes something.
RosenCruz
Because of the guy who found it. Zero, in eastern languages equals to sfr=cifer=zifir etc. It comes from the name of the guy who invented it.

Romans for example never had an idea like that. That is why their numbers are so weird.
zimmer
zero is nothing that it represents in value 0.

Anything zero is nothing.
LxGoodies
johans wrote:
because zero simplifies nothing for a number. Its just representation that Zero is nothing but if you add with other numbers then Zero becomes something.

Multiplication or division will have an even greater impact. I wonder if people would be able to understand negative numbers without considering 0 (zero) a "cypher" in its own right. It would be difficult to calculate e.g. the difference between -1 and 1 (=2) without a notion of the zero number in between -1 and 1.
supermanlovejan
Why 0 called 0 ? Hahahaha, very simple question, but........ I no known the answer. Hahahaha. ....
k_s_baskar
Nyasro wrote:
i also want to know these things,
like why there is only 0,9 numbers Laughing


do you medan 6 has six angles!!!
thejoyofcominghome
10 for our ten fingers. Seems logical to me that when you want to represent "nothing" with your fingers, you make a closed hand. This looks a bit like a "0" to me. Or maybe a filled dot would have been more appropriate.
LxGoodies
thejoyofcominghome wrote:
10 for our ten fingers. Seems logical to me that when you want to represent "nothing" with your fingers, you make a closed hand. This looks a bit like a "0" to me. Or maybe a filled dot would have been more appropriate.


Maybe that counts for Arabs (cifr=circle), who imported it from India, Brahmagupta, denoted 628CE,



(from here )

..but the much earlier Babylonian zero looked quite different !



(from here )

many Babylonian tablets refer to wages, accounts and debts. I suppose "zero" simply originates from trade, prices, economy.. that is calculus. Whatever cypher system you adopt, like base 6, 10 or 16, a position in a number can be zero (e.g. 2505, or FF0C, or 111011). In that case you need some symbol to write it down to calculate with it. According to the website mensioned above, the earlier Babylonian tablets denoted zero with empty space. The symbol was adopted just to avoid confusion..
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