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What's happening in Brazil?





Vanilla
Do you wish to understand what's happening in Brazil right know? The answer is very simple: we're tired. The protests that are sweeping the country are not about 20 cents. It's not news that Brazil suffers from corruption since its "discovery". Some even say that it's a characteristic trait from our people. But the same people that have been been called "corrupts" are now going to the streets to protest: against corruption, for a better health system, better public transport, new schools... And since the eyes of the world are upon Brazil now (we're hosting the Confederations Cup, next year we'll host the world cup and in 2016 we'll host the Olympic Summer Games), the time is ripe. And I'm proud to see my generation actually doing something.

This is what Rio de Janeiro looked like during last night (Monday 17th).
And this is Brasília (our capital) during the protests last night.



This is São Paulo right now. I don't know the numbers, but today's protest is bigger than the one that happened yesterday (65 thousand people in the streets). Right now they are marching and singing the National Anthem while São Paulo's biggest avenue is stopped by the protesters.

Quote:
When more than 200,000 protesters took to the streets across Brazil on Monday night, they demanded a dizzying array of improvements - from halting the fast rise of prices to cleaning up government corruption.

If one message stood out, it was that Brazilians are no longer willing to accept the rosy outlook that politicians in Latin America's biggest country have been painting for years.

Until recently, Brazil was one of the world's most envied economies. An export boom, growing domestic demand and ambitious social welfare programs for much of the past decade led to average annual economic growth exceeding 4 percent and lifted more than 30 million Brazilians from poverty.

But vast economic differences still divide Brazil.

A sluggish economy, rising inflation and the poor quality of public services are prompting optimism to wane. Brazil may have made big strides, but daily life for most people remains a gritty, frustrating ordeal compared to what they imagine when considering the country's elusive potential.

Source: Reuters


And this is only the beginning. Today, new protests happened and a lot more is going to happen during the next days.
truespeed
Nothing to add comment wise,just a gif.

twotrophy
Thank you for informing the community about recent politics. It is good that the people of the country is willing to take action to demand improvement. Is there any violence reported so far because it is an important concern.
Vanilla
Awesome gif, @truespeed. Very Happy

twotrophy wrote:
Thank you for informing the community about recent politics. It is good that the people of the country is willing to take action to demand improvement. Is there any violence reported so far because it is an important concern.


Unfortunately, yes. Yesterday (June 18th) after the end of the manifestation, some people started to sack stores in São paulo downtown. These were not protesters, these were a bunch of criminal trying to take advantage of the situation. The police was watching and did nothing. That's funny because earlier the police was accused of being too violent (they've attacked even the press with pepper spray and rubber bullets). So they decided to watch crime unfold before their eyes? They can do their job for a change. The government is dispatching the National Force to help control the situation.

As you can see, not a good time to come to Brazil.
watersoul
Hi Vanilla, I had thought about you a few times since seeing this on UK media.
That is a massive amount of people involved, and I hope things can stay peaceful without authorities labeling protesters as just extremists or terrorists. That seems to be a growing tactic around the world.

It is also not difficult to imagine police officers making no attempt to stop some looting or damage, because this of course makes the protesters look like criminals. When protesters appear more like criminals it is easier to enforce more violent policing to stop them.

I hope you can stay safe, and this people power will make positive changes to your country.
deanhills
The power of the media! Wonder how corrupt the media in itself is however, and who exactly are the people behind the media pulling every one's strings? Reminds me of an interview that Julian Assange had with Rafael Correa, President of Ecuador in April 2012 about vested interests in the media responsible (bought) for flaming up protests. Correa is one of the most popular democratically elected Presidents in the history of Ecuador and highly educated with a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Illinois. He is an amazingly gifted orator. Really enjoyed this show. Well done Julian!



I remember during my visit to Ecuador in September last year, when I was traveling by car from Guayaquil to Manta - a few hours trip during a Saturday morning. And the taxi driver, Pablo was glued to the radio with President Correa preaching against corruption and crime for the whole of our journey. Unbelievable the energy that President has! He definitely has passion, sincerity (or the appearance of it at least) and the power to persuade.
Vanilla
watersoul wrote:
Hi Vanilla, I had thought about you a few times since seeing this on UK media.
That is a massive amount of people involved, and I hope things can stay peaceful without authorities labeling protesters as just extremists or terrorists. That seems to be a growing tactic around the world.


Today is a very very tense day here. Currently we're on CNN's first page.

Broken promises and corruption fuel Brazil protests

The raise in the bus fare was canceled yesterday but the manifestations are growing stronger day by day. People tried to broke into Itamaraty Palace about two hours ago and they threw Molotov cocktails and tried to set the palace on fire. It was so sad to watch it happening. I support the protests but I don't believe in vandalism and I surely don't support violence. Few people today were out of control and these are the ones noticed by the media. I'm very sad to inform you that people died today. Sad Tomorrow I'll be among the protesters, so wish me luck. I live near São Paulo (about 70 km distant) in a small town called Bragança Paulista, but more than 8.000 people have confirmed they'll be present in my town's protest. I believe I'll be safe, some of my relatives will join me tomorrow and we pretend to stick together no matter what.


watersoul wrote:
It is also not difficult to imagine police officers making no attempt to stop some looting or damage, because this of course makes the protesters look like criminals. When protesters appear more like criminals it is easier to enforce more violent policing to stop them.

I hope you can stay safe, and this people power will make positive changes to your country.


Right now I'm scared because the violence has escalated, but I do believe we're changing for the better. Thank you for your wishes. Tomorrow I'll tell everything that happened during the protest in my city. Smile

deanhills wrote:
The power of the media! Wonder how corrupt the media in itself is however, and who exactly are the people behind the media pulling every one's strings?


Here's what happened last week: the media was calling the protesters "terrorists". Then the police started to chase people from TV and newspapers - there's lots of pictures of journalists hit with rubber bullets or trying to fight the effects of pepper spray or tear gas. THEN the media joined the protesters because they were now -FINALLY- trying to show what the police was doing even when the protest was a pacific one. Tired by the lies perpetrated by the media, the protesters now are chasing journalists and burning cars from TV stations. How about that? I guess they're kinda late for all this "blaming the media" stuff but so is everyone who is protesting now.

Let me tell you that I hate the current president (and the past one) because they're just perpetrators of the panis et circensis government. I didn't vote for them. I want them out of Brasília. But if everyone is protesting against them (and against their social handout policy) they should have voted for the right president in the first place. I can't wait for the next elections, can't wait for this nightmare to be over. They are talking about a coup. Well, I believe in democracy. So why I'm joining the protesters? Because I have a lot to say and I want to be seen by the ones ruling the country right now.
twotrophy
Good luck with the protest. I hope that you'll be safe. If the mainstream media has been said to report lies, what about non-mainstream media such as online news websites and blogs? Are they reliable sources of informatiom?
deanhills
Vanilla wrote:

Let me tell you that I hate the current president (and the past one) because they're just perpetrators of the panis et circensis government. I didn't vote for them. I want them out of Brasília. But if everyone is protesting against them (and against their social handout policy) they should have voted for the right president in the first place. I can't wait for the next elections, can't wait for this nightmare to be over. They are talking about a coup. Well, I believe in democracy. So why I'm joining the protesters? Because I have a lot to say and I want to be seen by the ones ruling the country right now.
Seems to be a good time for meaningful changes to be made, so great you can be part of it. I'd say the fact that you could not get a grant to fund your research to me is symbolically a sign of an urgent need for change so that opportunities could be available for people like you make your country a better place to live in.

I don't know whether you had a chance to view the YouTube interview with President Rafael. When Julian asked him how it was possible for him to be responsible for so much change, he said that it was not his doing. The need for change had to come from the people, and he was only the facilitator in all the changes that happened after his election. So maybe the time is right for something like this to happen in your country too, and hope you can find an equivalent leader who puts the people first, but at the same time is strong enough to make changes that not all of the people may like. I.e. a leader who is unafraid to be unpopular at times and that can inspire and motivate people in both good and not so good times.
handfleisch
Good work, Vanilla, and good luck. The Olympics have a bad history behind them. The brutality against the poor to clear them out before the Mexico Olympics in 1968 was mostly covered up. Brazil's status as a third world country in spite of being quite wealthy is an outrage. That's happening in the USA too and we must fight any way we can. Vanilla get some unions, fight for some better minimum wage laws, worker protection etc etc. Can you give us a summary of worker rights in Brazil? In the USA our minimum wage is very low, there are no guaranteed vacation (25% of workers have no paid vacation), no protection against being fired for no reason, unemployment benefits are low, etc etc
watersoul
Hey Vanilla, I see you haven't posted anywhere since saying you were attending a protest, just checking it went well and hope you're OK?
I assume you're just busy, but my concerned mind is always questioning, so I look forward to seeing your take on the current situation in Brazil without the media spin I get from the mainstream here Smile
Vanilla
I'm alive and kicking. Turns out I was busy with my new-old house. Smile

Things are changing, some for the best and some for the worst. People went to the streets today to ask a myriad of things from the president - and I must say that I wouldn't want to be in her shoes as of today. She didn't even go the Confederation Cup final match because she was to afraid of being booed again. Guess it's a Brazilian tradition to boo our great leaders in international events. FIFA even stated that Dilma not showing in that particular match was "disrespectful". Well FIFA, suck it up. As for Dilma, what a coward. Tis not a surprise her popularity is so low nowadays. Our problem with her is that she took too much to talk about what was happening in Brazil. When she did decide to talk, we heard things like "importing doctors from other countries to improve our health system".

I mean, what the hell? We have doctors, what we don't have is a decent structure so they can work properly! I almost lost a leg three years ago because the cast was too tight. It was a Sunday and no orthopedist was on-call so I had to go to another city to take my freaking cast off. That's our health system, folks. If you want to have access to a good health system, you need to pay and you need to pay A LOT. But this is only one side of the problem. Next year we're having presidential elections and tis well known that the Brazilian memory doesn't last long. I hope tis enough just so people don't re-elect Dilma. Evil or Very Mad
handfleisch
Vanilla wrote:
I'm alive and kicking. Turns out I was busy with my new-old house. :)

Things are changing, some for the best and some for the worst. People went to the streets today to ask a myriad of things from the president - and I must say that I wouldn't want to be in her shoes as of today. She didn't even go the Confederation Cup final match because she was to afraid of being booed again. Guess it's a Brazilian tradition to boo our great leaders in international events. FIFA even stated that Dilma not showing in that particular match was "disrespectful". Well FIFA, suck it up. As for Dilma, what a coward. Tis not a surprise her popularity is so low nowadays. Our problem with her is that she took too much to talk about what was happening in Brazil. When she did decide to talk, we heard things like "importing doctors from other countries to improve our health system".

I mean, what the hell? We have doctors, what we don't have is a decent structure so they can work properly! I almost lost a leg three years ago because the cast was too tight. It was a Sunday and no orthopedist was on-call so I had to go to another city to take my freaking cast off. That's our health system, folks. If you want to have access to a good health system, you need to pay and you need to pay A LOT. But this is only one side of the problem. Next year we're having presidential elections and tis well known that the Brazilian memory doesn't last long. I hope tis enough just so people don't re-elect Dilma. :evil:


I often use Brazil as a negative example of what could happen to the USA if we keep going with our disastrous program of privatization and minimal government. Like the USA, Brazil is rich, but the economic disparity is really bad.
Vanilla
handfleisch wrote:
I often use Brazil as a negative example of what could happen to the USA if we keep going with our disastrous program of privatization and minimal government. Like the USA, Brazil is rich, but the economic disparity is really bad.


Uh... You do realize that the problem here is that everyone expects the government to take care of everything? Some of our problems were solved by privatization. Take telecom for example: when I was a kid, having a telephone was a luxury bigger than, say, having gold faucets in your bathroom. We have beautiful privatized freeways and hole-y ones: the ones still maintained by the government. A lot of people is asking for a lot of things and most of them expect the government to provide everything. We have a free health system that doesn't work as it should. The poorer expect the government to pay for everything. We're drowning in taxes and our government wants more. A lot of money is lost with corruption and our politics are still passing bills to raise their own salary. We are rich indeed, but our country is poorly managed since... I don't know, since the beginning I think.

People here don't like privatizing because it's ending all the useless jobs created by politics to hire their own families. Because our government is not thinking about the good of the nation when they want to hire a new "second assistant". I'm a liberal and I believe in minimal government. The system is not working because it's a broken machine, swollen with thousands of useless politics.
handfleisch
Vanilla wrote:


Uh... You do realize that the problem here is that everyone expects the government to take care of everything? Some of our problems were solved by privatization. Take telecom for example: when I was a kid, having a telephone was a luxury bigger than, say, having gold faucets in your bathroom. We have beautiful privatized freeways and hole-y ones: the ones still maintained by the government. A lot of people is asking for a lot of things and most of them expect the government to provide everything. We have a free health system that doesn't work as it should. The poorer expect the government to pay for everything. We're drowning in taxes and our government wants more. A lot of money is lost with corruption and our politics are still passing bills to raise their own salary. We are rich indeed, but our country is poorly managed since... I don't know, since the beginning I think.

People here don't like privatizing because it's ending all the useless jobs created by politics to hire their own families. Because our government is not thinking about the good of the nation when they want to hire a new "second assistant". I'm a liberal and I believe in minimal government. The system is not working because it's a broken machine, swollen with thousands of useless politics.


So you have the opposite problem in Brazil than we do in the USA. In the USA, privatization is causing a lowering of quality and an increase in prices. An example is the medical system, where we had almost no national system until Obamacare (which hasn't really started yet). In the privatized system, insurance was very expensive and private insurances could rip you off or cancel your insurance if you got sick. Also with privatization, things that are doing just fine, like public parks, are privatized and suddenly children have to pay just to go to the park. Things are being privatized for no good reason except greed, the opportunity for some rich people to get richer at the expense of the general population.

The US government is actually relatively small given the population and wealth of the USA. Also, the poor here do not expect the government to pay everything because it is quite difficult to get good benefits from the government, though there is a problem of abuse as there always will be.
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