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Is the End of the World here?!






Is the End of the World near?
Yes, the IS near
30%
 30%  [ 9 ]
No, we have a good future
40%
 40%  [ 12 ]
I dunno, I'm sick of this 'end of the world' comments
30%
 30%  [ 9 ]
Total Votes : 30

hac
You guys all know the hype about 'the end of the world is coming'. And last month was really bad for the world in general too. So what do you guys think?!

- Hac
S3nd K3ys
hac wrote:
...And last century was really bad for the world in general too. ...


fixed. Wink
dogrose
Very Happy I'm afaid it's useless to talk about the end of world for we could do nothing to stop it if it's ture.But we have more to do to make our life valuable.
To me ,it's enough to have a short visit in the world if only I lead a happy life .
yzy
U.S.-led forces strike al-Qaida stronghold

BAGHDAD, Iraq - About 3,500 U.S. and Iraqi troops backed by jets launched a major attack Saturday against an insurgent-held town near the Syrian border, seeking to dislodge al-Qaida and its allies and seal off a main route for foreign fighters entering the country.


People walk among the rubble of a destroyed house in Baqouba, Iraq, Saturday, Nov. 5, 2005. According to local residents the house was destroyed by U.S. troops after a roadside bomb exploded near a U.S. convoy patrolling the area. One civilian died and three were injured, eyewitnesses said. [AP]


U.S. officials describe the town of Husaybah as the key to controlling the volatile Euphrates River valley of western Iraq and dislodging al-Qaida in Iraq, led by Jordanian terror mastermind Abu Musab al-Zarqawi.

The U.S.-led operation includes about 1,000 Iraqi soldiers, and the offensive will serve as a major test of their capability to battle the insurgents ¡ª seen as essential to enabling Washington to draw down its 157,000-strong military presence.

Thunderous explosions shook Husaybah early Saturday as U.S. Marines and Iraqi scouts, recruited from pro-government tribes from the area, fought their way into western neighborhoods of the town, 200 miles northwest of Baghdad, residents said.

As fighting continued throughout the day, U.S. jets launched at least nine airstrikes, according to a U.S. Marine statement. The U.S. command said there were no reports of casualties among American or Iraqi forces.

However, the military said Saturday that three more U.S. troops had been killed elsewhere in Iraq.

One soldier was killed Friday by small-arms fire south of Baghdad, and another died the same day when the vehicle in his patrol was hit by a mine near Habaniyah, 50 miles west of the capital. The third soldier was killed Saturday in a traffic accident in southern Iraq.

Those deaths raised to at least 2,045 the number U.S. service members who have died since the beginning of the Iraq war in March 2003, according to an Associated Press count.

Also Saturday, five Iraqi police were killed and three wounded when a roadside bomb exploded in northern Baghdad, hospital officials said.

And 11 members of a Kurdish Shiite family ¡ª including an infant ¡ª were killed and three wounded when gunmen sprayed their minibus with automatic weapons' fire northeast of Baghdad, police said.

The relatives were returning to their home in the Baghdad area after visiting a family cemetery near Balad Ruz, about 50 miles away. Shiite Muslims traditionally pay their respects to their dead during the three-day Eid al-Fitr holiday, which marks the end of Ramadan and ends for most Shiites on Sunday.

The attack's motive was unclear, but tensions between Shiites and Sunnis have been on the rise in the area, with extremists from each community targeting the other.

Elsewhere, a 65-year-old male detainee died Saturday of natural causes at a U.S. military prison camp in southern Iraq, the U.S. military announced. Camp Bucca is located near the southern port city of Umm Qasr near the Kuwaiti border.

U.S. commanders hope the Husaybah offensive, code-named "Operation Steel Curtain," will restore control of western Anbar province ahead of the parliamentary election Dec. 15 and enable Sunni Arabs there to vote.

Sunni Arabs form the vast majority of the insurgents, and U.S. officials hope that a strong Sunni turnout next month will encourage many of them to lay down arms and join the political process.

However, some Sunni Arab politicians and tribal leaders complained that the Husaybah operation was endangering civilians in the overwhelmingly Sunni area and could lead to greater instability throughout Sunni sections of the country.

"We call all humanitarians and those who carry peace to the world to intervene to stop the repeated bloodshed in the western parts of Iraq," said Sheik Osama Jadaan, a Sunni tribal leader. "And we say to the American occupiers to get out and leave Iraq to the Iraqis."

Husaybah, a poor Sunni Arab town of about 30,000 people, is the first stop in a network of communities that the U.S. military suspects al-Qaida of using to smuggle fighters, weapons and explosives from Syria down the Euphrates valley to Baghdad and other cities.

Many Husaybah residents are believed to fled the town after weeks of fighting between Iraqi tribes that support the insurgents and those that back the government.

The U.S. military says foreign fighters comprise only a small percentage of the insurgent ranks, which also include supporters of Saddam Hussein and Sunni Arabs opposed to the Americans and their Shiite and Kurdish allies.

However, foreign Islamic extremists are blamed for many of the spectacular suicide attacks that have killed hundreds of Iraqis in recent months. And foreign extremists are seen as more likely to continue the fight regardless of whether Iraqi Sunnis gain a measure of political power in the coming vote.

Most Sunni Arabs boycotted the Jan. 30 election of Iraq's current interim parliament, but many members of the minority voted in the Oct. 15 referendum that adopted the country's new constitution. Many Sunnis also plan to vote in the Dec. 15 ballot, hoping to increase the low number of seats they control in the National Assembly now dominated by Shiites and Kurds.

In Baghdad, Fakhri al-Qaisi, a prominent Sunni politician running on a hardline ticket was shot Saturday as he was driving home. Doctors at Yarmouk Hospital reported him in critical condition.

Meanwhile, suspected insurgents shot and killed a Palestinian working as a security guard in Beiji, 155 miles north of Baghdad, police said. Insurgents frequently target Iraqis and others working for the Americans.

Al-Qaida in Iraq warned this week that foreign diplomats should leave Iraq or face attacks. The militant group also threatened to kill two kidnapped Moroccan Embassy employees who disappeared Oct. 20 while driving to Baghdad from Jordan.

On Saturday, Arabic language Al-Arabiya TV showed interviews with the families of the Moroccans, begging for their release.

"I plead with my brothers, the Muslim mujahedeen in the name of the Islamic law and in the name of justice, because Abdelkrim is a religious man," said Leqaa Abbas, wife of embassy staff member Abdelkrim el-Mouhafidi.

If the war continue,I think "the end of world " is right.Maybe it's a justicial war for forcing terror,but you see can you live in the war joyous!??????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????
hac
Glad to see nobody checked the first option (Yet!). Thanks for the replies. Really interesting observations yzy.

- Hac
OnlyOneLife
I want to know if anyone actually read that Question I don't know about the hype of the end of the world. Is there an article or something. d'oh!
Arrow
yzy wrote:
U.S.-led forces strike al-Qaida stronghold

BAGHDAD, Iraq - About 3,500 U.S. and Iraqi troops backed by jets launched a major attack Saturday against an insurgent-held town near the Syrian border, seeking to dislodge al-Qaida and its allies and seal off a main route for foreign fighters entering the country.


People walk among the rubble of a destroyed house in Baqouba, Iraq, Saturday, Nov. 5, 2005. According to local residents the house was destroyed by U.S. troops after a roadside bomb exploded near a U.S. convoy patrolling the area. One civilian died and three were injured, eyewitnesses said. [AP]


U.S. officials describe the town of Husaybah as the key to controlling the volatile Euphrates River valley of western Iraq and dislodging al-Qaida in Iraq, led by Jordanian terror mastermind Abu Musab al-Zarqawi.

The U.S.-led operation includes about 1,000 Iraqi soldiers, and the offensive will serve as a major test of their capability to battle the insurgents ¡ª seen as essential to enabling Washington to draw down its 157,000-strong military presence.

Thunderous explosions shook Husaybah early Saturday as U.S. Marines and Iraqi scouts, recruited from pro-government tribes from the area, fought their way into western neighborhoods of the town, 200 miles northwest of Baghdad, residents said.

As fighting continued throughout the day, U.S. jets launched at least nine airstrikes, according to a U.S. Marine statement. The U.S. command said there were no reports of casualties among American or Iraqi forces.

However, the military said Saturday that three more U.S. troops had been killed elsewhere in Iraq.

One soldier was killed Friday by small-arms fire south of Baghdad, and another died the same day when the vehicle in his patrol was hit by a mine near Habaniyah, 50 miles west of the capital. The third soldier was killed Saturday in a traffic accident in southern Iraq.

Those deaths raised to at least 2,045 the number U.S. service members who have died since the beginning of the Iraq war in March 2003, according to an Associated Press count.

Also Saturday, five Iraqi police were killed and three wounded when a roadside bomb exploded in northern Baghdad, hospital officials said.

And 11 members of a Kurdish Shiite family ¡ª including an infant ¡ª were killed and three wounded when gunmen sprayed their minibus with automatic weapons' fire northeast of Baghdad, police said.

The relatives were returning to their home in the Baghdad area after visiting a family cemetery near Balad Ruz, about 50 miles away. Shiite Muslims traditionally pay their respects to their dead during the three-day Eid al-Fitr holiday, which marks the end of Ramadan and ends for most Shiites on Sunday.

The attack's motive was unclear, but tensions between Shiites and Sunnis have been on the rise in the area, with extremists from each community targeting the other.

Elsewhere, a 65-year-old male detainee died Saturday of natural causes at a U.S. military prison camp in southern Iraq, the U.S. military announced. Camp Bucca is located near the southern port city of Umm Qasr near the Kuwaiti border.

U.S. commanders hope the Husaybah offensive, code-named "Operation Steel Curtain," will restore control of western Anbar province ahead of the parliamentary election Dec. 15 and enable Sunni Arabs there to vote.

Sunni Arabs form the vast majority of the insurgents, and U.S. officials hope that a strong Sunni turnout next month will encourage many of them to lay down arms and join the political process.

However, some Sunni Arab politicians and tribal leaders complained that the Husaybah operation was endangering civilians in the overwhelmingly Sunni area and could lead to greater instability throughout Sunni sections of the country.

"We call all humanitarians and those who carry peace to the world to intervene to stop the repeated bloodshed in the western parts of Iraq," said Sheik Osama Jadaan, a Sunni tribal leader. "And we say to the American occupiers to get out and leave Iraq to the Iraqis."

Husaybah, a poor Sunni Arab town of about 30,000 people, is the first stop in a network of communities that the U.S. military suspects al-Qaida of using to smuggle fighters, weapons and explosives from Syria down the Euphrates valley to Baghdad and other cities.

Many Husaybah residents are believed to fled the town after weeks of fighting between Iraqi tribes that support the insurgents and those that back the government.

The U.S. military says foreign fighters comprise only a small percentage of the insurgent ranks, which also include supporters of Saddam Hussein and Sunni Arabs opposed to the Americans and their Shiite and Kurdish allies.

However, foreign Islamic extremists are blamed for many of the spectacular suicide attacks that have killed hundreds of Iraqis in recent months. And foreign extremists are seen as more likely to continue the fight regardless of whether Iraqi Sunnis gain a measure of political power in the coming vote.

Most Sunni Arabs boycotted the Jan. 30 election of Iraq's current interim parliament, but many members of the minority voted in the Oct. 15 referendum that adopted the country's new constitution. Many Sunnis also plan to vote in the Dec. 15 ballot, hoping to increase the low number of seats they control in the National Assembly now dominated by Shiites and Kurds.

In Baghdad, Fakhri al-Qaisi, a prominent Sunni politician running on a hardline ticket was shot Saturday as he was driving home. Doctors at Yarmouk Hospital reported him in critical condition.

Meanwhile, suspected insurgents shot and killed a Palestinian working as a security guard in Beiji, 155 miles north of Baghdad, police said. Insurgents frequently target Iraqis and others working for the Americans.

Al-Qaida in Iraq warned this week that foreign diplomats should leave Iraq or face attacks. The militant group also threatened to kill two kidnapped Moroccan Embassy employees who disappeared Oct. 20 while driving to Baghdad from Jordan.

On Saturday, Arabic language Al-Arabiya TV showed interviews with the families of the Moroccans, begging for their release.

"I plead with my brothers, the Muslim mujahedeen in the name of the Islamic law and in the name of justice, because Abdelkrim is a religious man," said Leqaa Abbas, wife of embassy staff member Abdelkrim el-Mouhafidi.

If the war continue,I think "the end of world " is right.Maybe it's a justicial war for forcing terror,but you see can you live in the war joyous!??????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????
olag
I think we have a good future. Now, there isn't big threat.
tribe
Lets List This. Again please know I am a very smart person; I don't think of this UFO Stuff and I am very religious as a Catholic but please hear me out.

    -5 Major Hurricanes; 3 of which are now in the TOP 4 Strongest Ever!
    - Tsunami in Indonesia Area
    - Major Earthquakes throughout world
    - Global Warming TALK Which isn't true
    - Riots beginning to rise worldwide!
    - Red Sox and White Sox held the two longest world series droughts in the MLB and win the world series in consecutive years; now is it time for the Indians and Cubs in 06 and 07?


Freaky World; Hell is going to freeze Over
cnnet
I saw a relate topci just now
while I don't agree this
the world could contine alive in the space for a very long time
hac
What tribe told are facts but I believe that they are just ways of mother nature to 'shake off' some excess population. It has happened before and will happen again! Wat about the hurricanes which came before these ones?! The world didn't end then but then again these hurricanes got into the Top 4!!!

- Hac
NobodiesHero
Who cares if the world really is coming to an end. If so, I guess there is nothing left for us to do anyway. That's why I suggest to leave worrying about this to all the people who have nothing better to do.
I rather go and enjoy life as long as I can. Worrying has never changed a lot.

But anyway, if you believe everybody who thinks he's got something to say on that topic I guess this planet would have been gone for a long long time.

Rock on, everybody.
freddymac
Hi,

I didn´t say that but some scientist did. The power of technology will destroy the world in the next 100 years. Very powerful Atomic bombs are going to be carried in suite cases and if used in large scales can trigger the end of the world... I really hope he is wrong and the future can be a nice place for our kids.
gonzo
the fortune cookie industry controls the future
rwojick
The first time I heard the end of the world stories was when I was walking downtown in my small town when I was in 7th grade. I'm 53 now.

There was this Christian Science storefront and they had a book in the window and it said the world was going to end in about 2 years and they gave the date.

They were wrong, but that is not to say that someone else can't try again any time they want too...
mstreet
I don't think the world will end anytime soon. I think the world is just going through changes environmentally and politically.
mjohnson
It depend on everone's effort all over the world if we want a good future
kr3tu
I'm afraid that in some years there might be a religous war between Christianity and Islam... you know, all those: terrorists atacks in america, riots in Paris, suicides in Iraq are caused by Islam followers
NuniPio
kr3tu wrote:
I'm afraid that in some years there might be a religous war between Christianity and Islam... you know, all those: terrorists atacks in america, riots in Paris, suicides in Iraq are caused by Islam followers


although they may claim to be islam followers, wat they are doing will get them into hell. the punishment for suicide in islam is to be in hell FOREVER!!
Lekoes
Well if you believe in life after death, it doesn`t really matter if the end of the world is comming. You don`t mind if the whole world gets destroyed as long as you end up in a good place after you`ve died. I think this can be a very big problem, cause some people will go to war to change the world into something they believe is best. If they die during this war, they won`t mind cause they`ve died for a "good" cause and they will go to a good place.

I think the world will end because of a religious war and the people who should be most afraid of this are the people that don`t have a religion.

But hey, this only my opinion Wink
Soltair
End of world... some tought it was for 2000... some for 1989... some even for 1930 something! And I'm still here... Too bad?

Hey guys... Last century was bad... But century before too. And before. And before. And before...

Humans are still here.

Oh I KNOW. It's not a good reason. Many, many things to improve. But no one can pretend humanity will end... Unless we have a major nuclear conflict (which is not likely to happen, as nobody wants to die with the rest don't they) no war will extermine human race. Nor sickness.

OK. End of world could then be created by the moon crashing on earth! Or a meteorit! Or the sun exploding!

C'mon... what's that. Moon is actually crawling away from gravity... meteorit... the world has survived others before. Sun? Well, maybe in a few billions of years...

UFOs? No no no. That does not exist. I don't want to talk too much about it, but I have good arguments.

End of world? No. Not yet. Problems? Tons... I agree. And all contradictory... but human nature was made to create problems. Confused
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