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Pollution, your views?





thiamshui
Hi,

Just wondering what everyones views, opinions, and facts towards the fact of pollution are? Where will we be because of it? What does it hurt most? What do you think about it? And what can be done to stop it?

Thanks guys, and I look forward to hearing your input. Cool
Resident Egoist
Idea I think you can always choose to go back to the Hobbesian existence of the Dark Ages if you don't like "pollution". It's a free country ... or so I hear them say.
SunburnedCactus
My views of pollution? Usually quite murky. Especially if it's smog.
raver
I don`t understand how anyone could be pro-polution. It has obvious effects on our lives and our enviroment. As long as there are out there ecological resources which can be used as replacements for other stuff that induces polution on our planet i say let`s use them. The problem is after all about money. Polutant products are cheaper. Enviromentally safe equipments are expensive. After all we are humans which in my book is a sinonym for greedy. Everyone lives in a money driven world, always tempted to make more and more...and then you die...eh...i could rant about this all day....try finding some people from http://www.greenpeace.org/international/ that can better argue the enviromental part of this debate Smile
mengshi200
I think changing mankind's present production way may be only way.for using clean enery ,need to tax from big company to support institution of reaserch.
ocalhoun
*edit*
---Embarrassing and very old post removed.---
din4
If you wish to get an in-depth pollution report for your county, covering air, water, chemicals, and more, please check:

http://www.scorecard.org/
SgtGarcia
There is far to much pollution at the moment. And there is enough that can be done about it. But that's only going to happen when all the countries set rules together. The US should also do something about pollution. They do just what they want instead of trying to reduce pollution.
linux1993
I think human have to master the skill to make rain entirely. Then the smoke pollution will be stoped. The ****** smoke shoule have disappeared. It's ever worst .
deanhills
The world needs more awareness campaigns to minimize the generating of pollution. Both on industry level and personal level. Point is to make people take responsibility for their share in pollution. For example buying fast food in wrapping that is not bio-degradable. By refusing to buy fast food like that one can influence the company to change the wrapping. Then to make sure that the wrapping is disposed off in the right way to make its final destination less hazardous for the environment. I like it when local Governments separate their waste into plastic, paper and "other" bins .... that's already a good start, and also helps increase awareness of waste disposal.
darthrevan
I believe pollution is bad for the planet, especially for the animals and humans in it. Sometimes though I think it might be exaggerated. Global warming they say is caused by pollution and maybe other factors but that can be exaggerated as well. So who is really telling the truth?
deanhills
This morning very early, when I was on a walk, could not help but think of this thread when there was wood smoke around. If the wind does not blow, air tends to hang where I live, and the local construction workers tend to burn all of the debris on a construction site, particularly in "winter". Temperatures here dipped to 25 degrees Celsius. Hot by European and North American standards. And that must have been the reason for burning stuff. And creating pollution of course. Reminded me of peak of "winter" here (usually not less than 10 degrees Celsius) when one can't go for walks because the wood smoke is too dense.
darthrevan
deanhills wrote:
This morning very early, when I was on a walk, could not help but think of this thread when there was wood smoke around. If the wind does not blow, air tends to hang where I live, and the local construction workers tend to burn all of the debris on a construction site, particularly in "winter". Temperatures here dipped to 25 degrees Celsius. Hot by European and North American standards. And that must have been the reason for burning stuff. And creating pollution of course. Reminded me of peak of "winter" here (usually not less than 10 degrees Celsius) when one can't go for walks because the wood smoke is too dense.


Where I am from, we don't have a lot of pollution. Though sometimes you will smell wood burning so that people Can stay warm during the cold mornings and during winter. We don't have hardly any plants around either.
deanhills
darthrevan wrote:
deanhills wrote:
This morning very early, when I was on a walk, could not help but think of this thread when there was wood smoke around. If the wind does not blow, air tends to hang where I live, and the local construction workers tend to burn all of the debris on a construction site, particularly in "winter". Temperatures here dipped to 25 degrees Celsius. Hot by European and North American standards. And that must have been the reason for burning stuff. And creating pollution of course. Reminded me of peak of "winter" here (usually not less than 10 degrees Celsius) when one can't go for walks because the wood smoke is too dense.


Where I am from, we don't have a lot of pollution. Though sometimes you will smell wood burning so that people Can stay warm during the cold mornings and during winter. We don't have hardly any plants around either.
You're lucky. I've been thinking too about the "natural" pollution like drinking water out of plastic bottles, the way I've been doing for a very long time. Water is transported in the back of trucks without refrigeration, so am dead certain some of the plastic toxins must be seeping into the water. I wonder sometimes whether tap water would be better using one of those Britta filters. On the other hand, I'm not that certain where the tap water is from. So difficult to trust it. Sort of a choice of lesser evils, without solid information.
BigGeek
SgtGarcia wrote:
There is far to much pollution at the moment. And there is enough that can be done about it. But that's only going to happen when all the countries set rules together. The US should also do something about pollution. They do just what they want instead of trying to reduce pollution.


You know this is a sore subject for most Americans, contrary to what you might think the US has the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) and they have set standards and focused on the most polluting businesses and government facilities out there. They have a list of the most polluted sites in the US, and steps being made to enforce environmental regulations to clean them up. The EPA Superfund sites!!

The problem is not the government, which has made great strides at enforcing regulations to keep the environment clean and get the businesses to install the latest technology to clean up the pollutants.

The problem is not the US, it is the other countries in the world that have no EPA, and no environmental regulations. Additionally along with these countries the US corporations (as well as other countries corporations) do not want to foot the bill to conform to the regulations in the US, or in their countries, so they approach other governments that allow them to build their factories in their country where there are no regulations, this way they can manufacture and pollute with no constraints against them.

The corruption, paying off politicians in these foreign countries is incredible. Typically these corrupt politicians are paid under the table to look the other way and allow these big corporations a free reign at polluting, with not ramifications, and typically the bought off politicians move or vote against any environmental standards or labor standards for that matter, in an effort to keep their ill gotten wealth. In short they sell out their own people and environment for their own financial well being.

The exodus of US manufacturing from the US has not totally been for labor cost reduction alone, it has also been to circumvent environmental regulations too, which are costly. Not to mention work place safety.

Why pay the extra money to build a new factory in the US where you have to build it with worker safety in mind and conform to OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) regulations, EPA regulations, as well as pay the workers a livable wage. Moving off to a foreign country that has no laws or regulations allows them to build unsafe factories, with no environmental constraints, and take advantage of low cost labor and no benefits to their employees, like health or life insurance.

Honestly if every country would adopt the EPA standards of the US and enforce them, these large polluting corporations would have no place to move to avoid environmental protection. As well as no other countries left to move to that allow them to exploit the labor force.

So in closing, the US does not do what ever it wants when it comes to polluting, we are actually leading the way in protecting the environment, the problem is that the wealthy do not want to conform to these standards and are willing to spend millions in a foreign economy where they do not have to, and these foreign governments are all too willing to take their money and let them do as they please



Evil or Very Mad
Afaceinthematrix
deanhills wrote:
I like it when local Governments separate their waste into plastic, paper and "other" bins .... that's already a good start, and also helps increase awareness of waste disposal.


The issue is that recycling - for most items - is only slightly more efficient. It still generates waste and uses quite a bit of energy (which leads to pollution) to recycle most items. I think that one of the worst items to recycle is plastic whereas aluminum (or aluminium depending on where you live) is a recycling success story.

The best solution is just to reduce the amount that you use because, quite honestly, most of these items are unnecessary and it just blows my mind that people still use these items. I think that the United States alone uses over one billion plastic water bottles per year. We could recycle them so that they don't end up in landfills but that is quite inefficient. The other solution would be to simply purchase a water filter for your house (which are relatively inexpensive) and then purchase a metal water bottle (which are always light weight and extremely cheap). I like what San Francisco has done. They invested in water filtration systems around their city (we also had one at my school in Southern California). These are fountains where you can fill up your water bottle with filtered water for free.

Another issue that absolutely blows my mind is that I see people bring their food to work every single day in several different plastic bags and then a paper lunch bag. They have their sandwich in a plastic bag, their chips in a plastic bag, and everything else in a plastic bag. They then put their lunch into a paper bag. What is the point? I put my food into a Tupperware and then all of the Tupperware into my lunch box. I don't use any of that waste. I also know people that actually use paper towels, plates, and cups on a daily basis at home. Why? Not only is that wasteful ecologically speaking, it's just wasteful economically speaking. Why would you spend money on that?

The issue with people is that these are not difficult changes. Putting your food into a Tupperware or lunchbox is just as easy as putting it into plastic bags and paper bags. Plus, it saves you money. Putting your food onto a paper plate saves you an entire thirty seconds of washing off that plate. That's a negligible amount of time and it's just wasteful!

Recycling is not the answer. Not using these products is the answer.
darthrevan
deanhills wrote:
darthrevan wrote:
deanhills wrote:
This morning very early, when I was on a walk, could not help but think of this thread when there was wood smoke around. If the wind does not blow, air tends to hang where I live, and the local construction workers tend to burn all of the debris on a construction site, particularly in "winter". Temperatures here dipped to 25 degrees Celsius. Hot by European and North American standards. And that must have been the reason for burning stuff. And creating pollution of course. Reminded me of peak of "winter" here (usually not less than 10 degrees Celsius) when one can't go for walks because the wood smoke is too dense.


Where I am from, we don't have a lot of pollution. Though sometimes you will smell wood burning so that people Can stay warm during the cold mornings and during winter. We don't have hardly any plants around either.
You're lucky. I've been thinking too about the "natural" pollution like drinking water out of plastic bottles, the way I've been doing for a very long time. Water is transported in the back of trucks without refrigeration, so am dead certain some of the plastic toxins must be seeping into the water. I wonder sometimes whether tap water would be better using one of those Britta filters. On the other hand, I'm not that certain where the tap water is from. So difficult to trust it. Sort of a choice of lesser evils, without solid information.


If you are from a developed nation then your water is probably safe and the Britta filters would do you good, though if you cab find one that removed the fluoride from the water it would be better. A radio show I listen to, said that fluoride can cause health problems, some pretty bad ones.
deanhills
darthrevan wrote:
A radio show I listen to, said that fluoride can cause health problems, some pretty bad ones.
Darn! When I had my teeth cleaned on Saturday, I had a major fluoride treatment too. Twisted Evil
darthrevan
deanhills wrote:
darthrevan wrote:
A radio show I listen to, said that fluoride can cause health problems, some pretty bad ones.
Darn! When I had my teeth cleaned on Saturday, I had a major fluoride treatment too. Twisted Evil


Take a look at http://www.fluoridealert.org/issues/health/ yeah it is kinda scary.
coolclay
An old post but a good post, I don't know how I missed it the first time around in 2005 but anyway here I go.

While very few people would admit to being pro-pollution, in my opinion most people are regardless. The flaw in a market based system is that many costs are never taken into account. Health, which most people would agree is a significant cost to a society is not taken into account, the cost of pollution is very rarely taken into account, the cost of burning or plowing down forests is not taken into account, the cost of disposal and/or recycling is not taken into account, the cost to our children, as well as many other "costs" are rarely taken into account.

While myself being an intrinsic nature loving individual find it morally wrong to attach a dollar sign to an animal, an ecosystem, or polluting. In our horrifically designed society and market based system it may be the only way to force our society to take these things into consideration.

One shining educational example is the "carbon footprint" idea, (of which many calculators exist online). Based on your lifestyle it is possible to get an extremely rough calculation of how many Earths would be required if everyone lived that way. While I think the accuracy of any of these calculations is largely in question some are quite good. On a day to day basis, I question almost every choice I make on the basis of 2 things, up front cost and environmental cost. In my life most choices that have a cheaper up front cost also are cheaper environmentally. This doesn't apply to everyone however.

Sustainability while being a huge buzz word I admit, should also be the ultimate goal of our society. Which essentially means living within our environmental confines. Of course this can only happen once several factors are reached.

1. Most importantly population stability/retraction must be required. I refer to one of my "heroes" Garrett Hardin for a great quote "A finite world can support only a finite population; therefore, population growth must eventually equal zero." And eventually it well, but the question remains how? By biological force (disease, starvation etc) or will humans miraculously wake up and use the brains we were given by our creator.

2. While I am a stringent free market supporter, capitalism and the idea that growth can continue in a finite world is a fatally flawed system, and well eventually crash in a huge fiery oblivion (anyone else smell the fire starting?).

I hate to hold myself as an example because I am flawed in many ways, I still think I live a fairly comfortable and yet sustainable lifestyle.

I rarely if ever buy brand new items, in the rare occasion that I do, if possible I try and purchase locally sourced items. I am a professional dumpster diver both of goods, and of food. I'd say at least 50% of what I own/eat comes from others wastefulness. Another 25% of my diet comes from what I grow/collect/kill myself. I have 2 vehicles a '82 motorcycle that gets around 45mpg, and a '81 diesel Rabbit pickup truck that also gets 45mph and is converted to run on waste veggie oil. If I see garbage on the ground I go out of my way to either recycle it or throw it away. I am a metal scrapper, and pick metal out of peoples trash, and make around $50/month on it. I have an Ebay business where I sell things I get out of the trash, and that others give me to sell. I very rarely use disposable goods, such as paper towels, plates, bottled water etc. I use extremely low amounts of electricity about ~3kwh/day. During Christmas, and birthdays and such I make gifts for my family usually, or give used items.

With all these things combined I am able to live on about $400/month all inclusive.

I don't pretend for a second that we can all eat out of a dumpster, and run our cars on veggie oil. But it makes me feel better knowing I am personally having a much smaller impact. If others adopted even a tenth of this ideal, I think we would be in a much better place as humans.

Anyway that's one hell of a post, and I think I'll wrap up there.

In conclusion the only solution to creating a better future for our future generations and ourselves we need to change our collective lifestyles, most importantly living within our means, and finding a true financial and environmental equilibrium.

P.S. I highly suggest if you have the time reading any and all of Garrett Hardin's works while not exactly scientific, he offers some great food for thought.
deanhills
coolclay wrote:
Anyway that's one hell of a post, and I think I'll wrap up there.
An AWESOME post Coolclay. WOW! Wish I could live that way too. Admirable and a great example to follow.
Afaceinthematrix
coolclay wrote:

I rarely if ever buy brand new items, in the rare occasion that I do, if possible I try and purchase locally sourced items. I am a professional dumpster diver both of goods, and of food. I'd say at least 50% of what I own/eat comes from others wastefulness. Another 25% of my diet comes from what I grow/collect/kill myself. I have 2 vehicles a '82 motorcycle that gets around 45mpg, and a '81 diesel Rabbit pickup truck that also gets 45mph and is converted to run on waste veggie oil. If I see garbage on the ground I go out of my way to either recycle it or throw it away. I am a metal scrapper, and pick metal out of peoples trash, and make around $50/month on it. I have an Ebay business where I sell things I get out of the trash, and that others give me to sell. I very rarely use disposable goods, such as paper towels, plates, bottled water etc. I use extremely low amounts of electricity about ~3kwh/day. During Christmas, and birthdays and such I make gifts for my family usually, or give used items



My main flaw is that I have a car that gets awful gas mileage. I get around 20 MPG. However, I want to get something better but I just cannot afford it right now. However, I compensate with my driving habits. I walk or ride my bike most places and I only have to get gas about once a month.

I also like to buy used. Clothing is something that takes quite a bit of energy to produce and because it's relatively cheap, people constantly change their wardrobe with the current fashions. I am wearing clothes that I bought back in high school many years ago and they, of course, came from the thrift store. I have always purchased my clothes from the thrift store because you can get some pretty cool and basically new items for 1/10 of what you would pay at a normal store and then I wear those clothes until I absolutely cannot anymore. I literally walked out of my last pair of shoes (I took a step in the bottom of the shoe was now behind me and my sock was on the ground).

When I buy a house (hopefully soon... I'm a recent college graduate and working on developing my career) I plan to immediate purchase solar panels. With all of the rebates and savings that you get these days, they are extremely cheap. Plus, all of the solar companies offer reasonable payment plans and unlike most investments, you can calculate your guaranteed savings (just look at how much electricity you use each month and how much electricity your panels generate and multiply the savings by the price per kwh). Not many investments have guaranteed savings.

I agree about the overpopulation part. Our planet has far too many people and we need to reduce the population. Having children is probably the worst thing that you can do for the environment. I'm already looking into a vasectomy (and I have no children).

The part that you didn't really mention was food choices. I gave up meat a long time ago because meat production (especially beef production) is detrimental to the environment as is a lot of these pre-packaged frozen foods. I like to buy my food in bulk (large bags of rice, beans, and potatoes), eat the stuff that I grow, and buy the rest from the local farmer's market. I also like to either brew my own beer because I can reuse my same bottles over and over or I like to buy my beer in a growler (a large glass bottle that you purchase and then take to the brewery and they fill up) so that I don't have to waste so many bottles (you don't throw away a growler).
coolclay
Thanks Deanhill, I am a little passionate about trying my best to leave a world worth living for my children.

Afaceinthematrix I am glad you brought up those points (especially the beer one). I also brew, distill and dabble in other fermented arts/foods. I usually have at least several types of beer, and wine on hand at all types! Makes for a fun household. It's another one of those cheap=environmental=fun points I mentioned.

While I wish I could personally say I don't want to produce any children, I would feel 100% incomplete without at least one child of my own. I would love to also adopt at some point (unfortunately it's even more expensive than having your own child). I also personally believe that my girlfriend and I would produce so incredible genetic stock to take on the future world!

I also believe that at some level if all the wise and environmentally minded people forgo having children it is entirely possible we may end up in an Idiocracy type situation. Evolutionarily speaking if all the idiots go around knocking everyone up and all the more intelligent people have less than 2 offspring, the idiots shall inherit thy Earth, and the cycle will continue and worsen.

Look at the effects of our current government system, poor mothers are intentionally having more children so they can get more government assistance. I grew up in a single mother home, I know what it is like, and it's tough no matter how you look at it. But the current setup is functionally paying mothers to have more children. But that's another topic for another day!
deanhills
Good point that Matrix about the clothing. Wish we had the North American type thrift stores in the rest of the world. I remember when I was living in Vancouver, BC that is usually where I got fantastic deals. I remember I bought a winter coat that was almost new and from Bulgaria, for 15 USD, and I wore it all of the time. But yes, I marvel at the wastage of all of the rags that are being produced and consumed every day.

Good point about population increase Coolclay and how the system is supporting mothers who cannot really look after their children, to have more children. I think all of it is in shambles all over the world. Not sure what the solution is, other than education, but if people are hungry and having more children means more income, they probably will go for the easy path of least resistance. Filling tummies will come before education.
spinout
pollution here means tax money... So you buy your right to pollute. This is the common way, a fee for the community so the people living there sees the trouble...

well could have worked but no!
Thing that are extra costly by tax is more fun so people pay up and pollute!
Afaceinthematrix
deanhills wrote:
Good point that Matrix about the clothing. Wish we had the North American type thrift stores in the rest of the world. I remember when I was living in Vancouver, BC that is usually where I got fantastic deals. I remember I bought a winter coat that was almost new and from Bulgaria, for 15 USD, and I wore it all of the time. But yes, I marvel at the wastage of all of the rags that are being produced and consumed every day.


Thrift stores are amazing. They save you so much money and you are reusing something instead of buying it new. I also donate some of my old stuff to the thrift store so that someone else can benefit from it.

On a side note, I recently read an article that talked about how 40% of the food in America is wasted. A lot of it is at the industrial level but there's also quite a bit at the consumer level. I know many people who will not eat leftovers. Not only is that a huge waste of money, but it's a huge waste of our resources! Also, it's a huge waste of time. I absolutely love leftovers because they save me money and quite a bit of time. Who has time to cook every day? I like eating cooked meals for lunch and dinner. However, I only cook a once or twice a week. I'll cook a bunch of my ingredients at once and use all of the ingredients that I've cooked (beans, rice, potatoes, vegetables, etc.) and then use all of those ingredients to make different meals for the week. I even distribute the ingredients among each meal so that everything gets eaten and nothing is waste, and then I put them in separate tupperware containers. Then, when it's meal time, all I have to do is grab a container and pop it into the microwave and 90 seconds later I have a meal! And then I try to throw in a piece or two of fruit a day.
deanhills
I alternate cooked and salad days, sometimes have two consecutive days that I cook. I usually portion the raw fish/meat/chicken at the time of purchase, nothing goes to waste. Only part that goes to waste sometimes is the lettuce that tends to get limp quite fast around here. I like to keep my tomatoes outside of a fridge, and when I see them getting overripe will cook those in bulk with lots of onion, ginger, garlic, etc and portion them in tupperware. The tomato mix is usually so delicious, impossible to go to waste. Particularly great with burger. I probably overspend on the fish/meat/chicken as I like to buy fresh/organic grass fed beef/chicken/salmon/tuna. I did do vegetarian for a very long while, however find that I do much better with solid protein. For now any way - I go through stages. I'm enjoying huge salads too, particularly with the Haz avocados that they have started to import from Mexico over here.
kaysch
I love to pollute my environment with a hearty fart. Although there are of course more environmentally-friendly ways of dealing with them... Wink

coolclay
Actually burning farts is the number one best way you can deal with them environmentally speaking anyway. Methane (and other types of natural gas) trap much more heat than CO2. That is why many landfills and anywhere you have petroleum, or gas extraction you see huge flares of flames. While IMHO it is still a waste (think of the electricity that could be generated with the waste gas) it is better than pumping it straight into the atmosphere. The amount of gas that is flared and wasted every year equals about 25% of the USA's annual usage!

See these 2 links for more details.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Landfill_gas_utilizationhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gas_flare

And on the food topic agreed 110% especially considering around 50% of my food is gleaned from dumpster diving! See an essay I wrote many years ago http://www.coolclay.info/DumpsterDiving.html and the legal issues http://www.coolclay.info/DumpsterLegality.htm
kaysch
coolclay wrote:
Actually burning farts is the number one best way you can deal with them environmentally speaking anyway. Methane (and other types of natural gas) trap much more heat than CO2. That is why many landfills and anywhere you have petroleum, or gas extraction you see huge flares of flames. While IMHO it is still a waste (think of the electricity that could be generated with the waste gas) it is better than pumping it straight into the atmosphere. The amount of gas that is flared and wasted every year equals about 25% of the USA's annual usage!

See these 2 links for more details.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Landfill_gas_utilizationhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gas_flare

And on the food topic agreed 110% especially considering around 50% of my food is gleaned from dumpster diving! See an essay I wrote many years ago http://www.coolclay.info/DumpsterDiving.html and the legal issues http://www.coolclay.info/DumpsterLegality.htm


Actually I wanted to bring a sense of humour to this otherwise pretty dry subject, but of course you are absolutely right. In fact biogas plants are mushrooming in Germany (which is where I live) for the very reason you mention, being environmentally friendly. Of course this does not apply to human farts, but there are a lot of chicken or cattle farms where it becomes economical to collect the gasses and concentrate them in such a way that gas can be used commercially. At least that's big business over here for many farmers.
rebbicajackson
According to my Opinion Deforestation plays the major role in polluting the air, so i guess if people start thinking about growing the trees as much as they can then i think there can be some change in air pollution !
kaysch
Currently there is a huge meeting of 17,000 participants from over 200 countries going on in Doha, Qatar. Those talks on international climate change have a long tradition of not delivering anything. I wonder whether this time there will actually some results as the basic reasons not to anything about the climate have not changed at all since the last meeting.
China, the USA, many European states, India, Japan and other industrialised states still value economic growth and jobs over actually reducing greenhouse gas emissions etc. Unfortunately Mr Obama has made that very clear in a statement.
twotrophy
I think that some pollution caused by humans is inevitable because almost everything that humans do has an impact to the environment. We should do our part in reducing pollution by taking precautions such as buying eco-friendly electrical appliances to reduce pollution. I think that it is worth it even if these appliances tend to be more expensive than regular ones.
lovescience
It has become more important to test soil and water for any toxic elements in soil and water. And also to have toxic elements testing in food products.
kaysch
One of the worst city of the world in terms of air pollution must be Cairo. Just look at this:

They must have the oldest busses, oldest cars and anything else about air pollution must be dating from the 1950s.
Why is a chaotic city as Delhi able to swith 3-wheelers to LPG whereas a supposedly modern city such as Cairo is not able to deal with pollution I fail to understand.
Another thing is that in Cairo there are hardly any public wastebins. Just in the place for tourists which are presumably more aware in terms of environmental concerns... So people throw away their plastic bottles and whatever they have into the street, waiting for the garbage people to clean up the next morning.
Pity, Cairo. You can do better than that!
zaxacongrejo
Quote:
ut there are a lot of chicken or cattle farms where it becomes economical to collect the gasses and concentrate them in such a way that gas can be used commercially. At least that's big business over here for many farmers.


agreed ive been in some in Germany and USA and is just the perfect solution for everyone it must be something mandatory in developed countryside know that is not always the environmental goal but the savings and funds you can get ,but never mind in the end the planet thanks
kaysch
zaxacongrejo wrote:
Quote:
ut there are a lot of chicken or cattle farms where it becomes economical to collect the gasses and concentrate them in such a way that gas can be used commercially. At least that's big business over here for many farmers.


agreed ive been in some in Germany and USA and is just the perfect solution for everyone it must be something mandatory in developed countryside know that is not always the environmental goal but the savings and funds you can get ,but never mind in the end the planet thanks

I agree, over here in Germany collecting gasses from farms is big business. Those gasses can either be consumed right away for heating or converted into electricity and injected into the public grid. Either way, it makes sense ecologically and - maybe to a lesser extent - also economically.

However I think farming does not contribute a lot to air pollution. The main polluters must be industrial users, traffic, power generation and heating. Which reminds me that there was a big government-driven programme to promote insulation on buildings, and traffic has become much more bearable since offgas regulations became much stricter. As an Indian colleague once put it - Germany is a good place to cure the lungs...

Anyway, all those things are not worth a lot if the main polluters - China and the USA - simply prefer to ignore global warming as they have just made it very clear again in Doha.
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