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Heat sink





Tony The Tiger
I have been having lots of problems with my Hewlett-Packard DV7 cooling system. My old laptop is a 2003 Dell Inspiron 8200. It has fans that blow the hot air out of vents on the vertical faces on the back of the laptop. However, my 2010 Hewlett Packard is much thinner and its cooling system blows the hot air out of slats that are on the bottom surface of my laptop. If I use my laptop in my bed or couch, it get really hot. I have returned it for heat sink repair a few times and each time it seems to cool the computer better at first, but it eventually becomes very ineffective at cooling itself.
ocalhoun
Tony The Tiger wrote:
I have returned it for heat sink repair a few times and each time it seems to cool the computer better at first, but it eventually becomes very ineffective at cooling itself.

That sounds like it's getting full of dust.
Try blowing it out with compressed air to remove the dust when it stops cooling as well; that should (at least partially) restore the cooling performance. It would be even more effective if you could disassemble it and clean it more thoroughly, but that may not be possible without breaking things and/or voiding the warranty.

As for getting hot when on a soft surface, putting a laptop cooling pad underneath it, or even just any hard flat object like a hardcover book or a board underneath it should clear up that problem.


Beyond that, blame the HP engineers for placing the heat exhaust in a less-than-ideal place, and take this kind of thing into account the next time you buy a laptop.
Tony The Tiger
ocalhoun wrote:
Tony The Tiger wrote:
I have returned it for heat sink repair a few times and each time it seems to cool the computer better at first, but it eventually becomes very ineffective at cooling itself.

That sounds like it's getting full of dust.
Try blowing it out with compressed air to remove the dust when it stops cooling as well; that should (at least partially) restore the cooling performance. It would be even more effective if you could disassemble it and clean it more thoroughly, but that may not be possible without breaking things and/or voiding the warranty.

As for getting hot when on a soft surface, putting a laptop cooling pad underneath it, or even just any hard flat object like a hardcover book or a board underneath it should clear up that problem.


Beyond that, blame the HP engineers for placing the heat exhaust in a less-than-ideal place, and take this kind of thing into account the next time you buy a laptop.

I am not sure I am able to blow the dust. I think I might end up just spreading it around inside the computer, which could be much worse in the long run.
Mr_Howl
Many HP laptops have heating problems. I'd recommend getting a laptop cooling fan, like one of these. I've found fans are typically better than the "cooling pads," which can stop being effective after some amount of time.
IndieCthulhu
If you're using your laptop with the power cable attached to it, you could always remove the battery one charged.

Having a fully charged battery continuously charging isn't very good for the battery, it overheats and loses lifetime, once charged remove it from the laptop which will help it cool down, or remove the charger. I found that to help my laptop stop over heating at one point.
Tony The Tiger
IndieCthulhu wrote:
If you're using your laptop with the power cable attached to it, you could always remove the battery one charged.

Having a fully charged battery continuously charging isn't very good for the battery, it overheats and loses lifetime, once charged remove it from the laptop which will help it cool down, or remove the charger. I found that to help my laptop stop over heating at one point.

I have never heard of batteries as being a source of laptop overheating problems.
IndieCthulhu
It has happened to my laptop and a friends... but the battery compartment can also be used to put extra cooling systems (fans, frost free ice bricks(stones in the freezer)) It can help
Tony The Tiger
IndieCthulhu wrote:
It has happened to my laptop and a friends... but the battery compartment can also be used to put extra cooling systems (fans, frost free ice bricks(stones in the freezer)) It can help

Never heard of the battery compartment as a host for a cooling system either. How big is the marketplace for this use of the battery compartment?--~~~~
IndieCthulhu
Tony The Tiger wrote:
IndieCthulhu wrote:
It has happened to my laptop and a friends... but the battery compartment can also be used to put extra cooling systems (fans, frost free ice bricks(stones in the freezer)) It can help

Never heard of the battery compartment as a host for a cooling system either. How big is the marketplace for this use of the battery compartment?--~~~~


not big at all, Mine was home made
sysna
you can get a better fan for your laptop, go to market and look for laptop fans which fit in your laptop and get a japanese highspeed but low noise one , they are a little expensive but worth the price they will just keep your laptop as cool as ice Very Happy
ocalhoun
...Or just stop buying things from HP... ^.^

Anyway, have you seen how much crappy bloatware software HP shoves onto all its hardware?
Why would you want that anyway?
Tony The Tiger
sysna wrote:
you can get a better fan for your laptop, go to market and look for laptop fans which fit in your laptop and get a japanese highspeed but low noise one , they are a little expensive but worth the price they will just keep your laptop as cool as ice Very Happy

I am not surprised that there is a marketplace for high-end fan upgrades. I'll have to check into that although I am about to upgrade to a new computer so the issue may be moot.
Tony The Tiger
ocalhoun wrote:
...Or just stop buying things from HP... ^.^

Anyway, have you seen how much crappy bloatware software HP shoves onto all its hardware?
Why would you want that anyway?

Are you suggesting that excess software is contributing to my system's overheating problem?
Ankhanu
Tony The Tiger wrote:
ocalhoun wrote:
...Or just stop buying things from HP... ^.^

Anyway, have you seen how much crappy bloatware software HP shoves onto all its hardware?
Why would you want that anyway?

Are you suggesting that excess software is contributing to my system's overheating problem?

I think he's suggesting that it's poor company behaviour... but yes, it will contribute to overheating to a minor extent. Every extra process your system is running contributes to its power consumption, and thereby its heat waste. Reduce the number of processes to only what's required and you generate less heat (and get much better performance in general).
Tony The Tiger
Ankhanu wrote:
I think he's suggesting that it's poor company behaviour... but yes, it will contribute to overheating to a minor extent. Every extra process your system is running contributes to its power consumption, and thereby its heat waste. Reduce the number of processes to only what's required and you generate less heat (and get much better performance in general).

My problem is hardware related and not a software issue, IMO. Everytime I send it back to HP, it works weel for 2 months and then it can't keep itself cool.
crazyfffan
Did you use a good thermal paste?
If you did, the overheat repetition is abnormal. You must inspect other sources of heat as well:
- The video card could be a great source of heat, try applying thermal paste to it too.
- HDD is another source.
- The CPU itself if running at full speed will be the biggest problem. Make sure you don't set the CPU clock fixed at its highest. If you're running Linux, make sure that you have cpufreq running at "On demand" mode.
Tony The Tiger
crazyfffan wrote:
Did you use a good thermal paste?
If you did, the overheat repetition is abnormal. You must inspect other sources of heat as well:
- The video card could be a great source of heat, try applying thermal paste to it too.
- HDD is another source.
- The CPU itself if running at full speed will be the biggest problem. Make sure you don't set the CPU clock fixed at its highest. If you're running Linux, make sure that you have cpufreq running at "On demand" mode.

I know it is not HDD. When I am on my backup computer while my primary is under repair, I move my secondary HDD to it. My current backup computer (a 2010 Hewlett Packard Windows 7 Pavilion DV7) overheats, while my primary (a 2013 Hewlett Packard Windows 8 Envy DV7) does not.

What is thermal paste? Is this something that most computer experts have and use?
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