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Batteries





Tony The Tiger
Why are there so many different types of camera batteries. It seems that each Canon DSLR uses a different battery that is not compatible with the batteries of any other Canon DSLR. Meanwhile almost every different type of flash works with AA batteries. What causes each camera design to use a unique battery type? Also, why don't they make all cameras compatible with SD cards. I don't understand why some use the bulkier older technology of compact flash. Shouldn't all newer cameras migrate toward SD card storage capabilities?
kbautospecialists
Most of the reason is so that you have to buy their proprietary battery.

If you can go online and buy a generic OEM for $3 they won't make any money on a replacement.

As far as using older technology, it's cheaper.
Tony The Tiger
kbautospecialists wrote:
Most of the reason is so that you have to buy their proprietary battery.

If you can go online and buy a generic OEM for $3 they won't make any money on a replacement.

As far as using older technology, it's cheaper.

Can I find generic OEM batteries for $3?
william
Tony The Tiger wrote:
kbautospecialists wrote:
Most of the reason is so that you have to buy their proprietary battery.

If you can go online and buy a generic OEM for $3 they won't make any money on a replacement.

As far as using older technology, it's cheaper.

Can I find generic OEM batteries for $3?


$3, occasionally. But I see them for $5 all over eBay. Not sure of the quality since some of the generics misrepresent the specifications of the batteries, but if you buy from a reputable seller, you'll get a battery as good as the original for a fraction of the cost.

Oh, and about the Compact Flash vs SD question. The answer is simple: Compact Flash cards are significantly faster than the best of SD cards. When you're shooting in RAW in bursts at high resolutions, you need that speed, and even a Class 10 SD card will struggle. Compact Flash also used to have a tremendous capacity advantage, though SDHC has closed that gap.
jmraker
Playing devils advocate, it may be the battery thickness or internal hardware layout inside the camera or maybe the weight balance. If the camera uses any one size battery it can't go much thinner than that.

I've seen big bulky cameras with oddball rechargable batteries (and it's own charger that no other charger can probably charge) though.
Tony The Tiger
william wrote:
Tony The Tiger wrote:
kbautospecialists wrote:
Most of the reason is so that you have to buy their proprietary battery.

If you can go online and buy a generic OEM for $3 they won't make any money on a replacement.

As far as using older technology, it's cheaper.

Can I find generic OEM batteries for $3?


$3, occasionally. But I see them for $5 all over eBay. Not sure of the quality since some of the generics misrepresent the specifications of the batteries, but if you buy from a reputable seller, you'll get a battery as good as the original for a fraction of the cost.

Oh, and about the Compact Flash vs SD question. The answer is simple: Compact Flash cards are significantly faster than the best of SD cards. When you're shooting in RAW in bursts at high resolutions, you need that speed, and even a Class 10 SD card will struggle. Compact Flash also used to have a tremendous capacity advantage, though SDHC has closed that gap.

I don't shoot raw so I could not say, but my SD card handles my 5.0 frames per second continuous shooting JPEGs with my Canon Rebel T4i.
Tony The Tiger
jmraker wrote:
Playing devils advocate, it may be the battery thickness or internal hardware layout inside the camera or maybe the weight balance. If the camera uses any one size battery it can't go much thinner than that.

I've seen big bulky cameras with oddball rechargable batteries (and it's own charger that no other charger can probably charge) though.

I am not understanding what you are saying.
william
Tony The Tiger wrote:
william wrote:
Tony The Tiger wrote:
kbautospecialists wrote:
Most of the reason is so that you have to buy their proprietary battery.

If you can go online and buy a generic OEM for $3 they won't make any money on a replacement.

As far as using older technology, it's cheaper.

Can I find generic OEM batteries for $3?


$3, occasionally. But I see them for $5 all over eBay. Not sure of the quality since some of the generics misrepresent the specifications of the batteries, but if you buy from a reputable seller, you'll get a battery as good as the original for a fraction of the cost.

Oh, and about the Compact Flash vs SD question. The answer is simple: Compact Flash cards are significantly faster than the best of SD cards. When you're shooting in RAW in bursts at high resolutions, you need that speed, and even a Class 10 SD card will struggle. Compact Flash also used to have a tremendous capacity advantage, though SDHC has closed that gap.

I don't shoot raw so I could not say, but my SD card handles my 5.0 frames per second continuous shooting JPEGs with my Canon Rebel T4i.


How long can you keep that up, though? When you shoot continuous, the photos are written into a buffer because slower SD cards can't keep up. Once you've filled the buffer you have to wait a few seconds for it to clear and finish writing. In JPG, you would be down to ~2-3 FPS at that point, and that's if you have a fast SD card. And just note, RAW files are a magnitude of, say, 4 times the size of a JPG. So with significantly larger files at even higher burst rates, a high end dSLR needs the speed of CompactFlash. For consumer level dSLRs, as you've noted, quick SD cards are adequate.
jmraker
Tony The Tiger wrote:
jmraker wrote:
Playing devils advocate, it may be the battery thickness or internal hardware layout inside the camera or maybe the weight balance. If the camera uses any one size battery it can't go much thinner than that.

I've seen big bulky cameras with oddball rechargable batteries (and it's own charger that no other charger can probably charge) though.

I am not understanding what you are saying.


Some of the cameras are thin and small. If a AA or AAA battery is too thick for the camera's design they'd have to go with something thinner. Kind of like trying to get a 10.5 mm thick AAA battery into a 7.6mm thick iPhone. Also it's not just a proprietary battery, there's also the proprietary battery recharger.

The bigger and bulkier cameras wouldn't have such an excuse as to why they don't use AA or AAA batteries.

I guess another reason could be AA and AAA batteries are made in different types and varying quality. The AA batteries at the Dollar Store might not be good for the camera's electronics and their battery is a way of reducing their camera repairs.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_battery_sizes
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_memory_cards
Tony The Tiger
jmraker wrote:
Some of the cameras are thin and small. If a AA or AAA battery is too thick for the camera's design they'd have to go with something thinner. Kind of like trying to get a 10.5 mm thick AAA battery into a 7.6mm thick iPhone. Also it's not just a proprietary battery, there's also the proprietary battery recharger.

The bigger and bulkier cameras wouldn't have such an excuse as to why they don't use AA or AAA batteries.

I guess another reason could be AA and AAA batteries are made in different types and varying quality. The AA batteries at the Dollar Store might not be good for the camera's electronics and their battery is a way of reducing their camera repairs.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_battery_sizes
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_memory_cards

I am talking about the cameras themselves (not the flashes). The cameras don't use AA or AAA batteries. They use OEM batteries. I.E., each camera manufacturer has the opportunity to design a camera around any battery that they want to make. Similarly sized, but different models by any given manufacturers use different batteries so often that it is annoying. It does not make much sense to me that if you upgrade from one camera to another by the same manufacturer and if the camera is basically the same size, that the batteries are not interchangeable.
Tony The Tiger
william wrote:
Tony The Tiger wrote:
william wrote:
Tony The Tiger wrote:
kbautospecialists wrote:
Most of the reason is so that you have to buy their proprietary battery.

If you can go online and buy a generic OEM for $3 they won't make any money on a replacement.

As far as using older technology, it's cheaper.

Can I find generic OEM batteries for $3?


$3, occasionally. But I see them for $5 all over eBay. Not sure of the quality since some of the generics misrepresent the specifications of the batteries, but if you buy from a reputable seller, you'll get a battery as good as the original for a fraction of the cost.

Oh, and about the Compact Flash vs SD question. The answer is simple: Compact Flash cards are significantly faster than the best of SD cards. When you're shooting in RAW in bursts at high resolutions, you need that speed, and even a Class 10 SD card will struggle. Compact Flash also used to have a tremendous capacity advantage, though SDHC has closed that gap.

I don't shoot raw so I could not say, but my SD card handles my 5.0 frames per second continuous shooting JPEGs with my Canon Rebel T4i.


How long can you keep that up, though? When you shoot continuous, the photos are written into a buffer because slower SD cards can't keep up. Once you've filled the buffer you have to wait a few seconds for it to clear and finish writing. In JPG, you would be down to ~2-3 FPS at that point, and that's if you have a fast SD card. And just note, RAW files are a magnitude of, say, 4 times the size of a JPG. So with significantly larger files at even higher burst rates, a high end dSLR needs the speed of CompactFlash. For consumer level dSLRs, as you've noted, quick SD cards are adequate.

O.K. so if you were to put compact flash cards on the same class scale that SD cards are on with class 10 being the highest for SD cards, about what class are the fastest compact flash cards?
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