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New fission power plants





davorin
Hi.
Does anyone have information about new fission power plant that is going to be built in France.
That power plan maybi solve all our energy problems for many years.

A that is not Nuclear power plants.
Ask google for more information.

Thanks for info.
Possum
I don't know about this new plant and will follow your post.. But you may want to investigate Energy from Thorium

http://energyfromthorium.com/thorium/
SonLight
The thorium reactor looks interesting. I don't know if it's the solution we need right now, but I do know that if we don't examine more new energy ideas we will continue to move in a bad direction. We need new fission reactor ideas, and also alternatives to the tokamak technology for fusion. Unfortunately most government research funding is based on continuing lines of research that current scientists have invested most of their career in. A still worse outcome would be throwing a lot of money at any idea with a good story. Balancing the needed original thinking with an intelligent pruning process to avoid excess losses on unworkable ideas is the key to our possible future economic success.
Possum
fission as a rule tents to be 20 to 50 years away...

Thorium is now.. And one of the best things about Thorium is that it can eat nuclear waste.

The Chinese are developing it so it will go online....
Bikerman
You have confused fission and fusion. FUSION tends to be 20-50 years away. FISSION has been with us for nearly a century.
SonLight
Bikerman wrote:
You have confused fission and fusion. FUSION tends to be 20-50 years away. FISSION has been with us for nearly a century.


The development of Tokamak technology, which is the only path to fusion power now being investigated in depth, is doubtless at least 20 to 50 years away. There are amateur experimenters now producing excess neutrons in low-intensity and very inefficient fusion reactions. I'm sorry I don't have the references handy, and there is no guarantee that it could be modified to produce more energy than it uses.

It seems to me that engineers are currently reluctant to try new fission technologies which are reasonably well understood theoretically. The situation with fusion is quite different. Scientists have rallied around tokamak technology, and I believe they tend to resist recommending any investigation of alternatives.

My comments about fission are much clearer, and perhaps I muddied the waters by including comments about fusion where the situation is quite different. I am struck by the fact that in both cases the long-term economic future is highly dependent on being able to take needed risks while avoiding wasting resources on dead horses. The time scale is indeed much different.
davorin
Here is the link about the fusion project
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ITER

And, here is demonstrating video.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cDXqikzUwBU

Link about progres
http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2010-09/16/fusion-power-plant

And this is link where they say that they made big progress.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/06/120608114624.htm
davorin
Latest News. Saudi Arabia will soon complete the first two reactor nuclear power plant.
And Iran is not allowed.
SonLight
davorin wrote:
Here is the link about the fusion project
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ITER

And, here is demonstrating video.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cDXqikzUwBU

Link about progres
http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2010-09/16/fusion-power-plant

And this is link where they say that they made big progress.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/06/120608114624.htm


Since I already took this thread a little off topic [to fusion, not just fission] I might as well respond to that last link. They are working on the engineering details of constructing the central core (selenoid) for the ITER reactor. While that is important and should be persued, it has already been determined that ITER -- which is still some years from completion -- will not be a net producer of power as originally intended. While the ITER research should continue, I think we ought to look for alternative types of fusion reactors. Here is one I was not aware of until now:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100512145348.htm

The Ignitor reactor is the result of fusion experiments intended solely to explore physics. When they found interesting properties of the plasma, they decided to persue the mechanism and now believe they can produce the first self-sustaining fusion reaction, hence the name, "Ignitor".
Pippo90
Indian people are doing wonderful things with Thorium, too. I really hope that the general population of my country (Italy) would change their mind, and allow the government to develop nuclear reactors. We currently pay much more compared to the average in Europe.
davorin
I think that Europe will give a huge amount of money in these projects. Energy in Europe's wrong and does not want to be dependent on Russia or the Arabs. A knowledge they have. If they reach the goal, to build the reactor, it will be a new renaissance era for Europe. The energy will be cheap, and will begin to think more seriously about electric cars.
davorin
India is another story. They also drastically plenty of energy, but unlike China, have been placed on the margin. And they just is not going to hand, they only supply route through Afghanistan and Pakistan.
I think that India is working on the same reactor, but not as widespread as in Europe. They have a lot of people, but they are dramatically less educated than all of Europe's population.
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