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Macro photography lens





Tony The Tiger
What is meant by a macro photography lens. Is a 50 mm f/1.8 lens a macro lens. Can I do macro with an 18-55 kit lens. If I am 10 inches away at 50 mm and f/9 is that the same as being 60 inches awat at 300mm and f/9? I realize that there is 6 times the camera shake at 300mm, but if I am on a tripod using a remote shutter control, should the results be the same?
Ankhanu
Macro generally refers to a lens with magnification of 1:1.5, 1:1 or stronger; basically, when the image of the subject hits the sensor/film at the same size (or larger) as the actual item. So, 1cm projects to cover 1cm of the sensor/film.
A 50mm lens is not macro, as the image projected onto the sensor/film is rather smaller than it is in reality.

Macro lenses are specialty lenses, and are marketed as such. Getting macro level magnification requires trade offs on focal distances and long-range distortion; special design considerations.
dude_xyx
Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L IS USM Macro Lens is expensive but one of the best Canon Macro lenses. There are different macro photography techniques depending one the items you have. Also you need other accessories like Light sets etc if you do serious marco photography.


These days some point and shoot cameras can take good macro photos without these lenses. I have an Canon Powershot SX10 IS Camera (three years old) and it can take very good marco photos. I use a small marco filter which is only $50 (compared to $200+ Macro lens) and I have taken some cool photos. Here's photo of an ant I had taken with that camera,



a dragonfly




My Flckr where I have couple of more photos taken with same camera,

http://www.flickr.com/photos/dudexyx/
Tony The Tiger
Ankhanu wrote:
Macro generally refers to a lens with magnification of 1:1.5, 1:1 or stronger; basically, when the image of the subject hits the sensor/film at the same size (or larger) as the actual item. So, 1cm projects to cover 1cm of the sensor/film.
A 50mm lens is not macro, as the image projected onto the sensor/film is rather smaller than it is in reality.

Macro lenses are specialty lenses, and are marketed as such. Getting macro level magnification requires trade offs on focal distances and long-range distortion; special design considerations.


Does that mean macro lenses are different for full frame and APS-C cameras?
Ankhanu
Not necessarily; but, as with using mia-matched lenses to sensor format, you'll likely have to crop the image if you don't want a black, round border.
Tony The Tiger
Ankhanu wrote:
Not necessarily; but, as with using mia-matched lenses to sensor format, you'll likely have to crop the image if you don't want a black, round border.

I know that one of my lenses (Sigma 8-16mm) is not compatible with full frame, but I thought my canon EF lenses were still compatible with full frame.
sgarstan
Macro photography is getting close. Technically macro is defined as photos which are made between 1/10 life size and life size. Normal photography is defined as less than 1/10 life size, and micro photography is defined as greater than life size. Don't worry about this since even these terms are defined differently by different people. For instance, Nikon, who also makes many microscopes, refers to their macro lenses as "micro" lenses.
fuzzkaizer
I think it's not the question of full-frame compatibility of the lense -
if you take a full-frame compatible lense and take a photo of anything and blow it up (that is, you take a small part of the photo and make it very big), you have actually quite something like a macro-photo; that also happens, if you use a digital zoom function. The rest of the photo will be skipped...
That is no problem, if your camera has a high enough pixel-resolution, to receive a satisfying photo quality.

But to enjoy the full range of your camera capability, you will have to use a macro lens and get very close to the "object of desire".
Tony The Tiger
sgarstan wrote:
Macro photography is getting close. Technically macro is defined as photos which are made between 1/10 life size and life size. Normal photography is defined as less than 1/10 life size, and micro photography is defined as greater than life size. Don't worry about this since even these terms are defined differently by different people. For instance, Nikon, who also makes many microscopes, refers to their macro lenses as "micro" lenses.

Are you sure the terminology that you are using is correct. I have heard that macro photography is when the object is smaller than your ccd. Normal is when the object is larger than your ccd. I have note encoundered the term micro photography before but I acknowledge that it very likely exists.
moncong
you can make macro by any lenses, just adding adapter for your lens or just use your lens backwards.
i often use my lens backward when i dont bring my adapter.. Very Happy
Tony The Tiger
moncong wrote:
you can make macro by any lenses, just adding adapter for your lens or just use your lens backwards.
i often use my lens backward when i dont bring my adapter.. Very Happy

I am very confused by what you mean when you say that you use your lens backward when you don't have an adapter. I have a Canon T4i. Do you think I could mount one of my lenses on the camera backwards and get macro photography effects?
Ankhanu
Tony The Tiger wrote:
moncong wrote:
you can make macro by any lenses, just adding adapter for your lens or just use your lens backwards.
i often use my lens backward when i dont bring my adapter.. Very Happy

I am very confused by what you mean when you say that you use your lens backward when you don't have an adapter. I have a Canon T4i. Do you think I could mount one of my lenses on the camera backwards and get macro photography effects?

If you're super steady, you can just hold the lens backwards to the body... but that is damn tough.
Alternatively, use a reversing ring; one side is threaded for the filter size of your lens, the other side is cut to be the same as your lens mount. You thread the ring to the lens filter and attach it to the camera. Here's my reversing ring attached to my 50mm and Nikon D80:




A reversed 50mm will get you pretty close to macro results. Some shots I've taken this way are here: http://ankhanu.livejournal.com/tag/macro

Alternatively, you can use extension tubes or a bellows between the body and lens, effectively adding more zoom on to a subject. These are basically spacers increasing the distance from the lens to the sensor/film.

A note: If using a reversing ring, or extension tubes/bellows without electronic connections, you'll need to use a lens with a manual aperture ring. Otherwise, you'll be taking photos with a full-open aperture, which will leave you with a terribly shallow DoF.

Another note: both of these methods leave you with a very narrow focal distance; the lens needs to be physically very near the subject to focus, and it's possible that the lens focus ring will do very little, leaving you moving the whole camera back and forth to find your focus. It can be tedious, but will get results. You can also mount your camera on a focusing rail on a tripod, which will give more precise camera position control.
moncong
that's it.. answered already Very Happy

beside reverse ring you can use macro adapter
Ankhanu
moncong wrote:
that's it.. answered already Very Happy

beside reverse ring you can use macro adapter

Right, I always forget about macro filters/adapters. If you use them, make sure they're quality glass.
Tony The Tiger
Ankhanu wrote:
Alternatively, use a reversing ring; one side is threaded for the filter size of your lens, the other side is cut to be the same as your lens mount. You thread the ring to the lens filter and attach it to the camera.

A reversed 50mm will get you pretty close to macro results. Some shots I've taken this way are here: http://ankhanu.livejournal.com/tag/macro

Alternatively, you can use extension tubes or a bellows between the body and lens, effectively adding more zoom on to a subject. These are basically spacers increasing the distance from the lens to the sensor/film.

A note: If using a reversing ring, or extension tubes/bellows without electronic connections, you'll need to use a lens with a manual aperture ring. Otherwise, you'll be taking photos with a full-open aperture, which will leave you with a terribly shallow DoF.

Another note: both of these methods leave you with a very narrow focal distance; the lens needs to be physically very near the subject to focus, and it's possible that the lens focus ring will do very little, leaving you moving the whole camera back and forth to find your focus. It can be tedious, but will get results. You can also mount your camera on a focusing rail on a tripod, which will give more precise camera position control.

What is the difference between a reverse adaptor ring and a reverse double coupling ring adaptor?
Ankhanu
Double coupler attaches one lense to another, objective to objective.
Tony The Tiger
I went to Calumet photo and they do not know what this equipment is. They have never heard of reversing the lens around.
Ankhanu
That's a good sign that the workers at the shop aren't very knowledgeable about photography... I suggest taking your business elsewhere, or you'll likely be led astray.
Tony The Tiger
Ankhanu wrote:
That's a good sign that the workers at the shop aren't very knowledgeable about photography... I suggest taking your business elsewhere, or you'll likely be led astray.


Are you suggesting that almost anyone who is truly an expert in photography is well-versed in the lens-reversing technique that you are introducing me to here. I have never brought up a topic about photography with them and gotten responses that indicate anything other than high level expertise.
moncong
Tony The Tiger wrote:
I went to Calumet photo and they do not know what this equipment is. They have never heard of reversing the lens around.


reverse ring and macro adapter is a kind of third party accessories, if you check on official store it wont available.
its a kind of creative accessories that manipulate lens, so we don't to spend more money.
authorized shop wont sell things that make his item more difficult to sell

Laughing Laughing
Ankhanu
I'm suggesting that well versed, knowledgeable and knows their stuff will at least be familiar with options, techniques and products to accomplish a variety of photography styles. I wouldn't expect them to be experts, but I'd expect them to know the option exists.

A knowledgeable, competent salesman will have a good, broad knowledge base. I know when I worked at a camera shop the owner encouraged us to do research so we could meet any customer's needs.. And if we couldn't to be able to suggest some way they could get what they want, or a good alternative.

Customer service requires good, wide knowledge.
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