FRIHOST FORUMS SEARCH FAQ TOS BLOGS COMPETITIONS
You are invited to Log in or Register a free Frihost Account!


rechargeable batteries and camera flashes





Tony The Tiger
Is it possible that if you leave batteries in a flash for a few days, that the flash will drain the batteries even though it is off. I had fully charged my rechargeable batteries last month. Then, I got a new Canon Speedlight 430 EX II on Monday. I experimented with it and used the flash no more than five times that day. Then I put the flash in my camera bag with the batteries in. On Thursday (yesterday), I started going through my flash manual. As I tried to perform various operations with the flash I encountered difficulty. It soon came to my attention that certain lights were not flashing and readings were appearing only for a brief second and then the readout went blank. It was as if the flash was on some sort of "screensaver" mode. I realized that my batteries were probably dead. I then swapped in freshly charged batteries. Suddenly various lights and meter readings were on again. The flash then seemed to respond to the instructions from the manual. Thus, I am questioning whether leaving batteries in a Canon Speedlight 430 EX II will cause batteries to wear down. The other alternatives are that (a) my battery charger is only barely charging the batteries and then they wear down with little use and (b) my batteries are not holding a charge.
william
That's not normal. Check to make sure the batteries are holding a charge. You could try them in other devices or if you have access to multimeter, check them with it. If it isn't your batteries, you might want to see if you can exchange that flash.

Edit: Wait, I read your post too quickly. You charged them a month ago? That's probably the reason they died so soon.
Tony The Tiger
william wrote:
That's not normal. Check to make sure the batteries are holding a charge. You could try them in other devices or if you have access to multimeter, check them with it. If it isn't your batteries, you might want to see if you can exchange that flash.

Edit: Wait, I read your post too quickly. You charged them a month ago? That's probably the reason they died so soon.


When I charge my camera batteries, they hold the charge for months. Do double-A batteries not hold the charge for that long? How expensive are multimeters (I am assuming that they are gauges to tell you how much charge your battery has remaining). Should I carry one in my camera bag? I also have two different battery rechargers in my bag (so that I can recharge two sets of double-As at once). Maybe one is not working so well.
dude_xyx
Maybe those batteries simply unable to hold the charge specially if those are old batteries. Only type of battery with good self-discharge rate are Sanyo Eneloop rechargable batteries. I have had those in my camera for couple of mouths worked without a problem.
sysna
A battery should not get empty by itself, it seems like a problem with your battery to me. I suggest you to use a set of new batteries. Also there may be a problem with your flash too.
jmraker
Rechargable batteries have a self-discharge that can go as high as losing 4% of their charge per day
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nickel%E2%80%93metal_hydride_battery
Tony The Tiger
jmraker wrote:
Rechargable batteries have a self-discharge that can go as high as losing 4% of their charge per day
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nickel%E2%80%93metal_hydride_battery

What is the normal self-discharge rate? How long would it take for the batteries to be unable to power a Speedlight 430 EX II with the normal self-discharge rate?
twotrophy
Your post reminded me not to leave standby batteries on for long periods of time. I heard at least a few times or more before that it can not only drain some batteries, it could also damage it. But does this important safety rule apply to mobile phones or other devices like PSPs or Nintendo game consoles?
Ankhanu
NiCd and NiMH batteries don't have a long shelf-life after charge; chances are your camera battery is Li-ION, which has a much better charge retention (but is also MUCH more expensive).

Add in that a flash/strobe is very power hungry, and each discharge eats a lot of your battery's stored power and you're in a situation in which you should charge your batteries after each period of use, or prolonged periods of non-use. Using rechargeable batteries in your flash requires a fair bit of up-keep, but, ultimately, is a wiser choice than using disposable batteries all the time.
Tony The Tiger
Ankhanu wrote:
NiCd and NiMH batteries don't have a long shelf-life after charge; chances are your camera battery is Li-ION, which has a much better charge retention (but is also MUCH more expensive).

Add in that a flash/strobe is very power hungry, and each discharge eats a lot of your battery's stored power and you're in a situation in which you should charge your batteries after each period of use, or prolonged periods of non-use. Using rechargeable batteries in your flash requires a fair bit of up-keep, but, ultimately, is a wiser choice than using disposable batteries all the time.

What is the relative difference in the amount of stored charge in a fully rechared NiMH battery and new disposable AA batteries.
Ankhanu
I can't give you a number, but you'll get a longer shelf life, and more flashes from disposable batteries, at least the good ones, compared to a single charge on rechargeables. That said, you get far more long term use out of rechargeables at a lower cost, with reduced environmental impact... you just have to maintain them.

If you want the shelf-life of a disposable, and want them to last as long as possible, get lithium disposables. They cost more, but will give you more cycles with a more consistent draw rate.
Tony The Tiger
Ankhanu wrote:
I can't give you a number, but you'll get a longer shelf life, and more flashes from disposable batteries, at least the good ones, compared to a single charge on rechargeables. That said, you get far more long term use out of rechargeables at a lower cost, with reduced environmental impact... you just have to maintain them.

If you want the shelf-life of a disposable, and want them to last as long as possible, get lithium disposables. They cost more, but will give you more cycles with a more consistent draw rate.

I was just making an inquiry. I am not looking to change from mi NiMH. I understand that compared to a single use of a set of rechargeable batteries, the disposable ones offer a bit more. However, the rechargeability is worth a lot more to me than the short term single use life. I'll keep recharging.
Related topics
G7 mouse
PlayStation 3
Wireless Mouse problems
the 9/11 truth
Wearing out mice ?
Operating cable cars
Video games cause Epilepsy (Fits)?
Tiger kills girl at Chinese zoo
colored guitar strings.
Need help building a shock circuit...
Camera problem?
Save Money, Save the Earth- An Easy Way
Fishing Line Angle Device
My hiking/survival gear, explained. (Warning, ~90 pics)
Reply to topic    Frihost Forum Index -> Computers -> Hardware and Electronics

FRIHOST HOME | FAQ | TOS | ABOUT US | CONTACT US | SITE MAP
© 2005-2011 Frihost, forums powered by phpBB.