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Mars One Released Their Qualifications For Their Astronauts





wallarookiller
So the non profit Mars one is planning to settle Mars in 2023 permanently. They just released their qualifications for their astronauts. Would you go to Mars on a one way trip, grow your own food, and slowly die of radiation?

http://mars-one.com/en/faq-en/21-faq-selection/251-do-i-qualify-to-apply
codegeek
Haha, that sounds awesome. Especially because I'd be famous and would get to contribute something to Science. Plus, there is always a chance that an alien civilization will find me and make me their king (or eat me alive, but I like to be on the optimistic side of things.)
ocalhoun
Nice ^.^ They're actually trying to do it.

But how are they expecting to get the funding?
Why would anyone finance an extremely expensive, yet small, unprofitable agrarian colony?
_AVG_
My question is still "How will they manage it?" Staying there for a few years is one thing but permanently is another. How exactly can our own food be grown? And what is the protection we will have against radiation?
Also, speaking of permanence - are they planning any sort of in-space reproduction?

I've assumed this mission is serious. Smile
SonLight
@wallarookiller, thanks for posting this. Whether this is really serious or not, in the sense that there is a good chance successful colonization of Mars will occur as a result, remains to be seen.

Reading the description of desired personal characteristics of the astronauts, it seems similar to what we expect from scientists who participate in polar expeditions or stay in the Antarctic over the winter season. The first team to leave Earth would have to be prepared for the possibility they are the only team who will ever go, and remain self-sufficient for the duration of their lives. As they age they would be less able to maintain their environment, but that should be offset by the fact that resources would be prepared for a larger population by the time they arrive.

It would not be acceptable for them to make the trip only to "slowly die of radiation" in the sense that radiation exposure would substantially reduce their life span. They would probably be exposed to more radiation than the average Earth dweller, but would surely have radiation shielding adequate to reduce their exposure to or below the levels experienced by some mountain-dwelling populations on the Earth.

The company's plan for financing seems reasonable. They will make a profit from the publicity. If they fail to reach their goal of colonizing Mars, I think they will still perform a service by doing much of the research, and perhaps can sell their facilities to a future space exploration group at a profit.

@_AVG_, the logistics are formidable, but their overall plan just might be doable. If not, they will be helping to define and meet the challenges that eventually must be met to reach Mars with a manned mission. The conventional approach to reaching Mars is to provide a round-trip vehicle. That solution is very expensive, and probably would result in the first trip taking place in 2050 or later. Their alternative is to provide a permanent livable environment on Mars, and they can do most of that by sending materials and robotic machines to Mars far in advance of the manned mission.

If the Mars One project comes to an end having only delivered substantial supplies to Mars for use by a future colony, they will still be a huge success, and will generate interest in space exploration in the process. If people go, they should expect that they and their descendants will be permanent, self-sufficient residents of Mars. Nevertheless I hope a high priority will be to provide vehicles that can make the return trip, providing a high probability that a few colonists could return to Earth for medical or personal reasons, or to help develop a reliable two-way transportation system. The return vehicles should be built primarily on Mars, but would likely require specialized components which would be shipped from Earth.
zaxacongrejo
This as been mentioned in other posts already, and it’s also a kind of big brother, a mix of several things, my opinion is just a dream will never happen this way but this is just my opinion
_AVG_
@SonLight: thanks for the positive reply. The way you put it, it seems reasonable theoretically. I hope it becomes practically feasible. And I agree, even if it fails, it seems to be a sincere attempt that will benefit future missions.
zaxacongrejo
how can we think on mars when the moon is so close and we have done nothing there yet?
johans
When i was a kid my dream job is to become astronaut. I wanted to work with NASA team. I dont know if that dream will become true since NASA is in privatization now.
jsk02a
johans, the dream is ever more alive since the privatization of space. Look at a company called SpaceX...go to a good school, get a good degree, and you have more of a possibility of working in Space now than ever.

I personally would love to be a space pioneer, and if this Mars One thing is for real, I think it's a really cool idea...though I still have no earthly (ha ha) idea how they are going to do this...they can fire a missile the red planet full of humans, but how are they going to get the equipment there?

Overall, I sadly do not think the Mars One team will succeed.
wallarookiller
SonLight wrote:
@wallarookiller, thanks for posting this. Whether this is really serious or not, in the sense that there is a good chance successful colonization of Mars will occur as a result, remains to be seen.

Reading the description of desired personal characteristics of the astronauts, it seems similar to what we expect from scientists who participate in polar expeditions or stay in the Antarctic over the winter season. The first team to leave Earth would have to be prepared for the possibility they are the only team who will ever go, and remain self-sufficient for the duration of their lives. As they age they would be less able to maintain their environment, but that should be offset by the fact that resources would be prepared for a larger population by the time they arrive.

It would not be acceptable for them to make the trip only to "slowly die of radiation" in the sense that radiation exposure would substantially reduce their life span. They would probably be exposed to more radiation than the average Earth dweller, but would surely have radiation shielding adequate to reduce their exposure to or below the levels experienced by some mountain-dwelling populations on the Earth.

The company's plan for financing seems reasonable. They will make a profit from the publicity. If they fail to reach their goal of colonizing Mars, I think they will still perform a service by doing much of the research, and perhaps can sell their facilities to a future space exploration group at a profit.



Oh, I know they're not just going there to die of radiation but that will most likely be a large factor to the way that they do die. Unfortunately.

Apparently while on the planet they will have to live 5 meters underground in order to not be exposed to the intense radiation according to Mars one.
http://mars-one.com/en/faq-en/19-faq-health/185-will-the-astronauts-suffer-from-radiation

And while outside they will have to wear intensely large suits that help deter radiation.

I think it's a really cool idea and the brave people that do it I give all of my luck to. Just wondering what other people thought and if they would go.
inoshi
wallarookiller wrote:
So the non profit Mars one is planning to settle Mars in 2023 permanently. They just released their qualifications for their astronauts. Would you go to Mars on a one way trip, grow your own food, and slowly die of radiation?

http://mars-one.com/en/faq-en/21-faq-selection/251-do-i-qualify-to-apply

Thanks for posting, I'll take a look. I support off Earth habitation and think it good for our species.
Nick2008
It sounds great, but I really don't think it'll happen in 10 years. 100? Maybe. We don't exactly have the technology to create permanent settlements on other planets, so my guess would be that the first missions would most likely be best suited for research and testing. Of course, I wish the best of luck to these brave folks who are willing to take on the challenge, but saying that we will create a permanent settlement on Mars in 2023 is a bit bold, so to speak.
inoshi
What do people think of the suite of useful personal characteristics?

Inoshi
metalfreek
When the Earth population reach 10 Billion then I will think about migrating Mars but for now its better that I live here. Besides Mars is a hostile place with no oxygen to breathe and no magnetic field protection from Sun's harmful radiation. I don't think people will be able to live a long happy life there for now. But may be after 100 years our technology will be good enough to make a nice hospitable place on Mars. But for now I am happy on Earth.
inoshi
metalfreek wrote:
When the Earth population reach 10 Billion then I will think about migrating Mars but for now its better that I live here. Besides Mars is a hostile place with no oxygen to breathe and no magnetic field protection from Sun's harmful radiation. I don't think people will be able to live a long happy life there for now. But may be after 100 years our technology will be good enough to make a nice hospitable place on Mars. But for now I am happy on Earth.

I believe that as a species we're perfectly capable of attending to permanent settlements on Mars. The principal ingredient for sustaining ourselves is there, H2O.

The only reason we're not doing so now is because of of the things that keep us Earth bound: politics, divisions, fear, poverty and allocation of resources to other areas.

Besides that, on a solar system and human scale there is still relatively quite a bit of useful, harvestable sunlight and heat.

Inoshi
metalfreek
inoshi wrote:
metalfreek wrote:
When the Earth population reach 10 Billion then I will think about migrating Mars but for now its better that I live here. Besides Mars is a hostile place with no oxygen to breathe and no magnetic field protection from Sun's harmful radiation. I don't think people will be able to live a long happy life there for now. But may be after 100 years our technology will be good enough to make a nice hospitable place on Mars. But for now I am happy on Earth.

I believe that as a species we're perfectly capable of attending to permanent settlements on Mars. The principal ingredient for sustaining ourselves is there, H2O.

The only reason we're not doing so now is because of of the things that keep us Earth bound: politics, divisions, fear, poverty and allocation of resources to other areas.

Besides that, on a solar system and human scale there is still relatively quite a bit of useful, harvestable sunlight and heat.

Inoshi


The only form of energy that we can harvest on Mars immediately is solar and Mars receives about 44% as much as the Earth receives so we will have to build a huge amount solar farm just to sustain some important life supporting equipment.
inoshi
metalfreek wrote:
The only form of energy that we can harvest on Mars immediately is solar and Mars receives about 44% as much as the Earth receives so we will have to build a huge amount solar farm just to sustain some important life supporting equipment.

I see. I wonder what the ambient ground temperature range is up to 20 feet or so below the surface in the equatorial regions?

I still believe we can do it. There may be other ways to draw thermodynamic energy from the atmosphere, and there are collectors to precipitate H2O that would probably work, but again to a lesser degree proportionally according to atmospheric density etc.
inoshi
inoshi wrote:
What do people think of the suite of useful personal characteristics?

Inoshi

I find this Mars link and suite of character traits really fun to think about. How has a lifetime of
experiential activities, exploration and study into a variety of subjects of influenced who and how I am in this world and what and how I do what I do . . . and how I respond to the kinds of obstacles and adventures that manifest for me? Does looking at this help you/me navigate our Earthly life in someway?

How are the suite of characteristics different from me, or as qualities of consciousness, are they existing at all, or being cultivated by me, and those entities that I have learned from, and how do they reference in your/my life explorations? To me it appears, this life prepares us for some settlements, I am sure, to come.

Inoshi
testsoc
Unfortunately I think commercial ventures are the only way we'll be getting off this rock. As much as it'd be nice for pure science to be at the forefront of our interplanetary adventures, I can't see it happening. Governments just don't give a damn.. they have enough problems keeping track of things down here.
lightworker88
Has anyone here applied to be a Mars One astronaut?

The main site is http://www.mars-one.com/.

Also, a group at MIT recently did an independent study on it, described at http://phys.org/news/2014-10-mars-mit-team-mankind.html

An article in the current "Popular Science" magazine says that some people have a "knee-jerk reaction" to the whole idea, deriding it for reasons not understood by those interviewed, most of whom were enthusiastic applicants. If those who deride it are honest about their reasons for doing so, then I don't understand either.

Some things I'm not seeing:
long-term goals, like mining existing local resources to make spare parts
Euterpe
This is the one way trip ive been looking for! Could you imagine the amount of talent and expertise that will be needed in order to successfully colonize mars. This will be the first real exploration since america was discovered.
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