FRIHOST FORUMS SEARCH FAQ TOS BLOGS COMPETITIONS
You are invited to Log in or Register a free Frihost Account!


Best place to learn LINUX





Jokiae
I want to learn linux, not just basics, but to become expert. I already learned basics, like opening folders, copy, move, premissions, mount hd. I tried googleing, but i get nowhere. I just get begginers stuff.
Marcuzzo
the only way to learn is the hard way. get one of them source code based distro's like slackware or gentoo and then you'l learn... eventualy Twisted Evil
Peterssidan
All unix commands have manual pages that you can read by using the man command e.g. man pwd will show the documentation for the pwd command.
loveandormoney
The most easy way is
to be a member of a forum
which is named by the name of Your distribution.

Siduction and Slitaz are "small" distributions
and there are forums by the developping team
where it is easy to find help.
jsk02a
If you really want to learn Linux, you have to make it your primary operating system. Learn to use WINE for all the Windows compatible programs...but learning it takes time, and you can only truly learn by stepping away from the GUI and doing everything via command prompt.

I would also suggest looking into setting up servers on your linux box: FTP, Apache2, LAMP, etc...those will teach you how to set up PHP, and how to manage users.
metalfreek
I am not too good at it but the thing I learned about linux is by installing it on my system and solving problems that I encounter during my usage. I am using Ubuntu and I find Ubuntu forum very helpful. And as always Google will be the first place to go.
loveandormoney
Because You use Ubuntu:
How can I update Xubuntu Pangolin to Quantal?

sudo apt-get dist-upgrade

does not work
codersfriend
loveandormoney wrote:
Because You use Ubuntu:
How can I update Xubuntu Pangolin to Quantal?

sudo apt-get dist-upgrade

does not work

I think you should start a new thread for your question
loveandormoney
Thank You for Your answer.
I started yet this thread and I am wating for answer.
But I thought, maybe in this thread, I can find users, who know Linux.

If You want to learn Linux
read a manual about the Bash.

Example: Bash for beginners.
sarcasmrules
Get a really old computer for a tenner or something, and install Arch Linux from scratch. You'll have to start off from a command line and you'll get to know all the config files.[/youtube]
sysna
Best place to learn linux is inside of it ! install a linux distro like ubuntu and start to learning it by trying to work with it. install some softwares using package manager and after that just try to install (make and compile) some sotwares using their sources.

There are many sources for useful terminal commands that you can use but most of the sources of softwares you get come by an installation guide which most of them write down the commands you should enter, so don't worry about learning linux, it is easy and once you find out how you can work with it you will be in love with it.
Arrogant
I was also trying to learn LInux
So which distribution would be appropriate for that.
loveandormoney
sarcasmrules wrote:
Get a really old computer for a tenner or something, and install Arch Linux from scratch. You'll have to start off from a command line and you'll get to know all the config files.[/youtube]


Ist
"Arch" a distribution
like Debian
which has a update every 6 months?

Regards
bahba
Installing UBUNTU. Debian based, easy to use, great interface.
Bahba
Qantas94Heavy
Really, the only way to "truly" learn about Linux is to work through the command line - you'll learn hell of a lot quicker, as well as finding out about cool tricks to do things much quicker than the GUI equivalent.
lightningleo
I think. the only way which is both entertaining and knowledgeable is the way of experience. Just install ubuntu (for debian types) and centos (for fedora types) and play with them in a virtual machine. Both are quite easy using. I think using them for 2-3 months continuous and you'll learn almost everything, atleast the frontend part and the gui. for terminal part, you should get a free linux vps from either host1free (crappy) or any other. Play with them. Just don't do anything illegal.
loveandormoney
Jokiae wrote:
I want to learn linux, not just basics, but to become expert. I already learned basics, like opening folders, copy, move, premissions, mount hd. I tried googleing, but i get nowhere. I just get begginers stuff.


Use Siduction.
There is a nice community with
24-7 chat support and You can ask every question and they help You with every step.
mattk71
I would go with what one of the other guys said...install arch or debian. Ubuntu and Ubuntu based
distros are too user friendly. But if you use debian or arch you will learn all the commands as well
as installing all the needed stuff to run linux. Do a minimal install and build it up from scratch. There
are lots of learning resources and forums for them, especially with Debian.
ademta
The best way to learn linux is to is install a linux distro which is well documentation like Debian or Ubuntu as to how to use linux and its applications and I would suggest one to go through how to guides available at respective sites and there forum and one can also learn how to use linux from www.tldp.org/ which has most of the guides about using linux and one can also go through GNU documentations.
ephedrandrox
Get a good book geared at passing a Linux certification of some sort. Depending on what you want to learn. Do some research on the different certifications available and find a book for the one that resonates with you the most and go from there.
quanmechanix
If you already learned the basics. Go the hard way, get a Slackware Linux Distribution, an LinuxFromScratch and a Gentoo. Then do some experiments in a Virtual Machine with those Linux Distributions!! Twisted Evil

If you're not contented with that, find more distributions that you can start from scratch. Cool
Peterssidan
quanmechanix wrote:
If you already learned the basics. Go the hard way, get a Slackware Linux Distribution, an LinuxFromScratch and a Gentoo.

I can imagine you learn a lot by using distributions like Gentoo. I have never used it myself but I have used Arch Linux and I learned a lot more using it compared to distributions like Debian or ubuntu. I once sat a whole lecture with another student in the front row trying to install Gentoo on his laptop computer without succeeding (Someone whispered in my ear he was trying to compile the kernel).
jajarvin
There is a good, free web course Introduction to Linux!

Course Starts - Jan 05, 2015
deanhills
jajarvin wrote:
There is a good, free web course Introduction to Linux!

Course Starts - Jan 05, 2015
Thanks for the link Jajarvin. I'm going to go for it.

Cool
jaeha
I am not sure why want to learn Linux. If it's for the job, I certainly recommend to try CentOS which is exactly same as Redhat Enterprise, but FREE.

Linux kernel are all comes from one source, so they are all same, but each distribution has different configuration and management, so you better stick the one which is popular.

Getting certificate for Redhat's certificates also could be good way to show you are capable handing Linux.

If you are just looking for fun and personal interesting.. Then I recommend to try as many as you like.. Different distribution has different flavor, and very interesting features. Many people like Ubuntu as it's close to Windows or Mac and hide a lot of things..

I guess everyone has different opinion for expert or master, but I think learning below tools would be useful:

- bash shell
- regular expression
- grep
- awk
- sed
- vi
- python
- perl
- sqlite, mysql, postgres
- NFS
- LVM
- iptables


Studying kernel source code could be ultimate way to understanding Linux internal, but it will requires not only C language skill, but also deep knowledge of OS general.. I have been playing and working on Linux more than 20 years, but still not understand how a single I/O go through from application to disk. So, need a lot of efforts and time.

Linux is not only most advanced OS, but also very fun to play with.
freepgu
Best and right place for learning *nix Family OS is itself!!!
You must install that on your pc and parctice with real machine!
Use a easy distro for few month and after that switch to pro distro.
Use irc and power community like arch to find your answers.
jestoy0514
Try to learn Bash/Shell Scripting and I am sure you are going to find what you are looking for. For starter try this Linux Shell Scripting Tutorial. Hope this helps.
Da Rossa
If you're a subscriber to Lynda.com (I don't mean to do any advertisement per se), you could check for Kevin Skoglund's Unix for Mac OS users. Don't mind the "for Mac OS X users" in the title, that course is just the ladder to learning the environment. Very decent instructor!
deanhills
I guess the real "expert level" learning only happens with regular "doing". Like when one has an objective. I've gone through the odd course in Linux and it's the one ear in and the other ear out. It's only when I have to get into my VPS and edit some files at root, that I'm actually really learning to use Linux. Like yesterday I had a great challenge to sort out a VestaCP bug for creating MX Records. It had to be fixed and there was no official patch for an easy command I could use. I'm using CentOS. So had to beef up on using VI - the editor that comes with CentOS. Kind'a archaic how the commands work - INSERT (i) Get out of INSERT (ESC key) SAVE (:w) EXIT (:q). Hope it sticks as I seem to remember I did this at end of 2014 too. Goes to show, the learning is mostly in regular doing. One has to do it every day and work through a number of challenges first before one can progress to the next level. I think it's also only at the level of regular doing and sorting out challenges that a course is really beneficial for getting to the next level of expertise.
Marcuzzo
I'm in no way an expert but I can manage my linux boxes.
I've learned it by just doing it, reading the --help output of commands, the man pages and an occasional google search.

I've also built the basic lfs system, it helped me a understand the system a little better.

Definitely worth doing if you've got free time
deanhills
Marcuzzo wrote:
I'm in no way an expert but I can manage my linux boxes.
I've learned it by just doing it, reading the --help output of commands, the man pages and an occasional google search.

I've also built the basic lfs system, it helped me a understand the system a little better.

Definitely worth doing if you've got free time
I beg to differ. You're an expert! Thanks for posting the link. That looks like an opportunity for a beginner learning experience. I can see you in the role of a really great and unique hands-on teacher! Cool
Marcuzzo
This is in no way intended to be a false modest answer but building linux from scratch isn't that hard, all you have to do is read the instructions on screen and run the command as they are presented to you.
In the end you'll end up with a linux distibution that you've built from scratch which is far from useful because it's a text based only os, to have a fully working os with window manager and what not you need to go beyond lfs which is also the name of the follow-up book and is a lot harder, should I ever have the time I'll give it a go but I'm not sure if it's worth the effort.

The OS will be a source based OS without package management and you'd need to compile 'everything' from source.

The day I no longer have to work on windows machines I'll ditch Microsoft software completely
deanhills
Marcuzzo wrote:


The day I no longer have to work on windows machines I'll ditch Microsoft software completely
I hope that day comes soon as I've come to thoroughly dislike Microsoft.

You're right. If one has all of the Linux commands nicely lined up in a "How to do XYZ", then it's easy. Even editing terminal files is doable if one Googles the steps. Doesn't mean that one always knows what one is doing, I sometimes do and quite often don't, but am learning as I'm doing. Every now and then when I realize how something fits together I have to bang my head against the wall for having been so dumb, but I guess that is part of the Linux learning curve. Razz

Must say I'm completely envious of your knowledge, as it is only someone with that depth and level of knowledge who can be as comfortable as you are at explaining Linux in its simpler details. Cool
loveandormoney
mattk71 wrote:
I would go with what one of the other guys said...install arch or debian. Ubuntu and Ubuntu based
distros are too user friendly. But if you use debian or arch you will learn all the commands as well
as installing all the needed stuff to run linux. Do a minimal install and build it up from scratch. There
are lots of learning resources and forums for them, especially with Debian.


People said
Debian is difficult.

That is wrong.
The using is the same easy as using Ubuntu or Fedora.
jestoy0514
I believe the best way to learn linux is by learning programming languages like bash shell scripting and c language and then dive in to making your own linux system from scratch because if you have no prior knowlegde with programming you will never learn the inside out of a linux system. For example extracting an archive file can be learn through bash shell scripting and you can use it as well for linux system administration. I hope this helps.
Marcuzzo
jestoy0514 wrote:
dive in to making your own linux system from scratch because if you have no prior knowlegde with programming you will never learn the inside out of a linux system. For example extracting an archive file can be learn through bash shell scripting and you can use it as well for linux system administration. I hope this helps.


Lfs is not about making your own distro, you're just compiling your toolchain and kernel, chroot into the new environment and make a few modifications.

You're not making your own distro. It will still be linux from scratch.

As far as I know you don't need any scripting experience to unpack an archive
Code:
tar -xvf filename
loveandormoney
Does anybody know a good bash workshop online?
Da Rossa
If you're leraning Linux (which apparently is the point of this topic) then skip learning bash for now.

I'm learning Linux, but I'm far from being an expert. One thing that got me curious is a codecademy curse called learn the command line. See here: https://www.codecademy.com/pt-BR/learn/learn-the-command-line
deanhills
Da Rossa wrote:
I'm learning Linux, but I'm far from being an expert. One thing that got me curious is a codecademy curse called learn the command line. See here: https://www.codecademy.com/pt-BR/learn/learn-the-command-line
Codeacademy is highly recommended by everyone, I like the link you posted Da Rossa. Just up my street as well.

I know some Linux, but now and then there's a command missing, and would be good for me to refresh it, and maybe make a record of them too. Like for example VI and all the commands that go with it.

Must say also that if there is something that escapes me, Google has a great way of finding it. It bales me out every time.
loveandormoney
When You look for something in LINUX
and u know the keyword
then its easy to find everything about Linux. As beginner
its a little bit difficult.
LoganDark
The best way to learn Linux is to dive in head first. Look up information when you need it, learn as you go. A simple tutorial isn't going to cut it.

Edit: My favorite editor on the command line is Emacs - it doesn't come preinstalled on most distros, but it is very easy to use and has lots of features. It takes a bit of getting used to, but the only keyboard combos you'll likely need to remember is save (Control+X-Control+S) and quit (Control+X-Control+C). I recommend starting out with it, as it doesn't require skill to operate.
Related topics
Teen Hungama::The Best Place for Teens
php counter
Best flavor of Linux?
Framasoft - A very great place for open source software
What's the best place you've ever visited/lived?
What's the best version of Linux
What are the best books of PHP and MySql?
Best Linux Edition?
Online shops
Best place to live in Europe?
Whats the best place to fish
Best place for Honeymoon
If we all met up somewhere where is the best place?
Best place in the world to live?
Reply to topic    Frihost Forum Index -> Computers -> Operating Systems

FRIHOST HOME | FAQ | TOS | ABOUT US | CONTACT US | SITE MAP
© 2005-2011 Frihost, forums powered by phpBB.