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Laptops in school





modeling-agent
Could it be that laptops make chidren lazy...they do not have to research anymore...or learn anything...because information is right at their fingertips
Bikerman
Way too simplistic. Kids have certainly changed, but trying to tie down obvious relationships normally doesn't work.
I was in the first year of kids allowed to use a calculator in the O level exams at 16 (1977) and there were mutterings about a generation of kids who would be unable to do the times table. In truth, most adults at that time were barely numerate, and even some of those who COULD reel-off their tables -
6 times 8 is 48
7 times 8 is 54
were just reciting a song "
tum-ti tum-ti tum tum tum"

They knew the beat and that helped them remember the words, but they didn't understand the lyrics.

I think I'd agree that concentration spans have decreased - which is something one would predict - but did YOU spend much time in research as a kid? I didn't. Most of my homework came from a set of crappy 1930 encyclopaedias at my Grans house, memory, and notes from school. Because that was our only research material, the homework had to be tailored to it, which made them very often trivial, tedious and uninspiring.

I can now set my students some real-world type questions, knowing that they can get the basic info they need as a trivial task and concentrate on the more important parts. Research IS a skill - a high level one as well, and I do think that we need to teach it more and better than we do now - with particular emphasis on informational value and how to gilter for reliability and accuracy. Thst is crucial to get anything sensible from the information overload they face. But we were probably LESS good at getting information together because we generally didn't get chance. Research is an increasingly important skill, but it is only a tool to get you going on the task, it isn't the task itself for most people. Just like the tables were a useful skill for getting you going on some maths, but they weren't the task, and a calculator made the actual tasks we could tackle more interesting.

We can predict what the huge rate of change will do to kids, but I bet we would be wrong more times than right Smile
Afaceinthematrix
Bikerman wrote:

6 times 8 is 48
7 times 8 is 54
were just reciting a song "
tum-ti tum-ti tum tum tum"


LoL... Wanna edit?


On a side note, most of my mathematics and science professors at the University purposely gave us problems where the numbers just worked out (i.e. enough things cancelled out or reduced to easy arithmetic) and then banned calculators. I had a graphing calculator in high school and it was stolen from me. After that I never managed to replace it because it was unnecessary. Despite the fact that all of my high school teachers encouraged calculator use, I didn't suffer at all in the University when I wasn't allowed to use one. By the time that you're studying high school geometry, trigonometry, and calculus, it should be assumed that you've learned the arithmetic well enough to not need to be tested on it anymore. If you haven't, then you will probably fail the course anyways.

In the University, when I took courses on Chaos Theory, Mathematical Modeling, and Fractal Geometry, we were divided into groups (they were small classes) of our choice at the beginning of the term and assigned a project (of our choice) to do and present (1 hour presentation) at the end of the term. We were allowed to design our project, study what we wanted (as long as it was on topic), and present what we wanted. My project for Chaos Theory and at least one project for the other subjects would not have been possible without a computer (and knowing basic programming). My project had to do with the chaos behind studying weather patterns and predictions.

I think that the computer might make some fields a little irrelevant. Why would I ever hire a history major to work for me when their value is little more than Google? I can Google any historical question that I want. I don't think that, when you're at a high enough level, computers make you lazy. They just make you more efficient. When doing mathematical models, you can do the very hard part - coming up with the formulas to represent your model - and then just give them to a computer to do the number chugging - which then gives you time to start on your next model.
JasonNewman
My school got a grant last year & every student grades 4-12 recieved an iPad, compleatly free of charge and able to take it home. It's returned during the summer, but who cares? Honestly I am doing much better in school and take my work seriously now, and when I was a freshman and we didn't have iPads I was not getting good grades. Now, I'm sooooooooo close to being a 3.0 student again. I don't even copy my homework anymore, I try to do it by myself no matter what! And now I'm in a senior class (Physics) and everything goes smoothly.


Last year my report card was A, D-, D, C-, C-, C-, E. (1.6)
Now I'm looking at A, A-, B-, B-, B-, C+ (2.94)
Iceaxe0410
I think it's the opposite. There is too much information at their fingertips and they are learning more than they did if they had only a book, lectures, and note taking. I think it's good that computers are being using in the schools. It teaches them a skill that they will use for the rest of their lives all while expanding their horizons. In the end, it's a tool for learning. How beneficial it is to the kids all depends on how they are directed and taught to use it.

I still think books are necessary, but books get old and outdated (exception being literature, language, or poetry books). The advantages to using computers is that there is always new information being reported and there are numerous sources that can be found especially if it is something in the sciences. It teaches them to look for multiple sources and determine the difference between reliable or false information. These are skills that will help them in the real world. Since, it's things that are used in the real world, they might be more receptive to learning. It all depends on how the information in presented. A good tool for learning is pictures and video to show what the material is talking about. Video is not something you can get with just books and lectures.
milkshake01
I think that is a good idea. Laptops provide a different way of learning. Although laptops cannot replace textbooks at this time because the are too expensive, maybe laptops would start replacing textbooks in the next 50 years. Another alternative is tablet computers.
chatrack
Hi,

If all parents are aware how to operate laptop and all it's functionalists , then there is no harm
in giving laptops to children. Now here is the parents are less in connected to computer
than the coming generation.
codegeek
I think it is a good idea to have laptops for learning. As a visual learner, I find it much easier to learn from video tutorials. I think each school/college should have a department for creating and distributing quality video tutorials and interactive content, for accelerating the speed of, and augmenting the passion for, proper learning and understanding. One should have a right to learn from one's preferred method of receiving information. I think the future belongs these interactive forms of education.
twotrophy
In my opinion, netbooks are the most suitable type of laptops for schools because they are small enough to conveniently place them on school tables. A full sized laptop would take up too much scape, making it hard to place other important things such as pencil cases and papers. On the other hand, tablets have less features such as a full fledged word processor such as the desktop version of Microsoft Office and they don't have physical keyboards which make typing slower although it might be practical because many tablets are cheap. As of 2013, I noticed that more and more schools have been using tablets such as iPads and computers such as MacBook Airs.
nayakjyotirmaya
laptops in schools will vastly reduce creativity and practical knowledge gain and experience gain of students from their environment and class rooms
jajarvin
Finnish matriculation examinations will be carried out from 2017 onwards, using laptop computers.
bukaida
It all depends on how you are using it. The analog world is harder than the digital world. So the laptop may be a tool to aid education, never a substitution for formal education. In these days also, there are lots of people selling fish/vegetables ( who can barely sign their names) can perform the calculation of the price of fractional weight materials ( like 225 grams @ Rs 44 per KG) within few seconds without any calculator.

Recently my brother has given my son a Acer chromebook which is a useless piece of s**t specially in our country where internet is pathetic. A device like that has hardly any use for kids.
cybersa
jajarvin wrote:
Finnish matriculation examinations will be carried out from 2017 onwards, using laptop computers.

I agree with you.
Because already in college level,they started to write online exam,interview etc...
limpands
Maybe this will answer your questions:
My mother has a great trick. She can tell checkout staff the total cost of her order before they've even plugged two digits into the till. Just to be clear, we're not talking your average supermarket shop here. Ten items or less.

Leaves me speechless. Largely because I'm still counting on my fingers and speaking would make that too hard.

The difference? Calculators. Commonplace in my school classroom. Unheard of in hers.

There's no denying it, technological advances have been hugely beneficial in educational terms but technology also makes us lazy learners.

Laptops correct our spelling, do our sums... and if you plug the right words into Google, will even write your essays for you. Cheating would be oh so easy. Trying to limit Internet access a nigh-on impossible task.

Then there's a plethora of studies out there claiming technology shortens attention spans - not ideal when studying for exams then.

Staring at a backlit computer screen is widely acknowledged not to be good for the eyes and there's a lifetime in an office for that.

Children need to learn the basics. It's what successive governments keep trying to return to. The three Rs. They need to know that working things out is hard, it takes time. Not the instant gratification of lobbing it into some app on your phone which will churn out an answer they can then neither reason nor understand.

Surely children need to learn how to programme the machines before they use them.

NOTE!!!! I didn't write this, just got it from here: http://www.ibosocial.com/fca45/pressrelease.aspx?prid=103721
cybersa
limpands wrote:
Maybe this will answer your questions:
My mother has a great trick. She can tell checkout staff the total cost of her order before they've even plugged two digits into the till. Just to be clear, we're not talking your average supermarket shop here. Ten items or less.

Leaves me speechless. Largely because I'm still counting on my fingers and speaking would make that too hard.

The difference? Calculators. Commonplace in my school classroom. Unheard of in hers.

There's no denying it, technological advances have been hugely beneficial in educational terms but technology also makes us lazy learners.

Laptops correct our spelling, do our sums... and if you plug the right words into Google, will even write your essays for you. Cheating would be oh so easy. Trying to limit Internet access a nigh-on impossible task.

Then there's a plethora of studies out there claiming technology shortens attention spans - not ideal when studying for exams then.

Staring at a backlit computer screen is widely acknowledged not to be good for the eyes and there's a lifetime in an office for that.

Children need to learn the basics. It's what successive governments keep trying to return to. The three Rs. They need to know that working things out is hard, it takes time. Not the instant gratification of lobbing it into some app on your phone which will churn out an answer they can then neither reason nor understand.

Surely children need to learn how to programme the machines before they use them.

NOTE!!!! I didn't write this, just got it from here: http://www.ibosocial.com/fca45/pressrelease.aspx?prid=103721


If you copied from other website,you need to quote.
doublekk
bukaida wrote:
It all depends on how you are using it. The analog world is harder than the digital world. So the laptop may be a tool to aid education, never a substitution for formal education. In these days also, there are lots of people selling fish/vegetables ( who can barely sign their names) can perform the calculation of the price of fractional weight materials ( like 225 grams @ Rs 44 per KG) within few seconds without any calculator.

Recently my brother has given my son a Acer chromebook which is a useless piece of s**t specially in our country where internet is pathetic. A device like that has hardly any use for kids.


I totally agree. It all comes down to how the school administration implements it.
On the one hand, digital devices, be it laptops or cell phones, are a source of distraction. Especially on our system which is score-based rather than intelligence, they can have a negative impact. On the other hand though, they are the need of the hour. You can't just prohibit their use. So I think its better for the school to have the infrastructure themselves and use them as required.
But I don't think it should be made a compulsion for the students to bring laptops to school. Not yet. And at least not below high school level.
Arrogant
No, it doesn't make them lazy. Information must be shared.Education means sharing knowledge.
And laptop/computer is a very helpful. It provides information but the children have to figure what it is trying to imply by themselves. So they do have to try. Copying doesn't do good in the long run.
picasaz
JasonNewman wrote:
My school got a grant last year & every student grades 4-12 recieved an iPad, compleatly free of charge and able to take it home. It's returned during the summer, but who cares? Honestly I am doing much better in school and take my work seriously now, and when I was a freshman and we didn't have iPads I was not getting good grades. Now, I'm sooooooooo close to being a 3.0 student again. I don't even copy my homework anymore, I try to do it by myself no matter what! And now I'm in a senior class (Physics) and everything goes smoothly.


Last year my report card was A, D-, D, C-, C-, C-, E. (1.6)
Now I'm looking at A, A-, B-, B-, B-, C+ (2.94)


exactly this what education is. Having an i Pads or laptops doesn't mean that you have become smart but you should know about using of them. Right use of technology can effects you positively very much. Nice to read that how gradually you are improving.
mshafiq
I think at school at school level it is not good that kids using their own laptop but if there is some assignment then it is ok but still avoid to use at school level but other level they are ok.
75alex
I believe, from a certain age students have enough maturity to be able to use laptops at school seriously. To me, this point would be from grade 10 (Or 11 UK) onwards. In france, we aren't allowed to use them (at least in public schools) until we get out of high school (At the age of 1Cool, and I think it could be allowed earlier on without causing any trouble.
abhinavm24
i would say laptop at schools should be a must. Laughing
aleast for me its a boost.
officer
no laptop at schools
Euterpe
modeling-agent wrote:
Could it be that laptops make chidren lazy...they do not have to research anymore...or learn anything...because information is right at their fingertips


First,I dont think it makes them lazy but instead allows them to be distracted easier in the already distracting classroom in which students who are considered lazy dont care to be there.

Secondly, as humans we never stop learning and progressing so to say they dont have to research is correct that they dont dig though piles of books but instead they sift through the web of false information looking for correct information which can be just as daunting as searching through a library of research journals.
playfungames
I do not think that laptop makes kids lazy. They are great for research and the internet which happens to have anything and everything is great for homework. But kids will be too much dependent on laptops and the internet. I don't know what to say about being fully dependent on technology. But I believe that it should be managed so that we can work even without staying connected to the internet.

But with laptops and the internet, there comes various distractions. There are tons of social sites, funny sites and Youtube which can be pretty distracting. What is the last time you tried to do some work on your computer and you ended up watching a drone wedding video on YouTube?
fuzzkaizer
i teach at a school where we have groups of pupils with laptops and others without laptops - and those with laptops are BY FAR not smarter the others.
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