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partition + linux





ganz
Hi guys,
I am going to partition part of my laptops hard drive and stick linux on it. So before I go googling I was going to give it a shot here first as a few people have demonstrated linux knowledge.

How much memory should I leave for the OS? And what should I use? The only one I've ever used a little bit was Red Hat. I want a GUI too, in case some dont come with a windows-type of one.

And more advanced which I can search for if no one know. I want to run apache, which I believe comes with all builds of linux...but then I want to be able to connect to it from this computer and upload webpages, etc. How to do it?
Helios
First of all, GOOGLE BEFORE ASKING QUESTIONS.

Now,
leave about 10 gigs of space.. that'll be just fine.
I always leave 20 gigs because I install lots of stuff and i also have a lot of music.

You will need 3 partitions:
One ext3 partition for the root ("/").
Another ext3 partition for you ("/home/usr")
And a SWAP partition that should be double the size of your memory.
(For example if you have 256 mB or DDR your swap would be 512 mB)

Nowdays even Debian has an easy-to-use partition manager.

So you just have to decide what distro would you like to have.

I'm afraid that I have no experience with apache servers on linux =(
But I think we have a lot of experts here(including Bondings) who will explain to you about apache+linux.

Good luck.
gonzo
I strongly advise you to install no more than ONE OS per physical drive unless you enjoy troubleshooting. As you are using a laptop this will be a bit more challenging. Now would be a good time for you to volunteer your cogent reasons for installing multiple OSs
dandelion
gonzo wrote:
I strongly advise you to install no more than ONE OS per physical drive unless you enjoy troubleshooting. As you are using a laptop this will be a bit more challenging. Now would be a good time for you to volunteer your cogent reasons for installing multiple OSs

Hmm... I have 8 installations of 5 various versions of 3 different operation systems on 3 hard drives in 2 computers (not laptops though) at home, and no problem inspite of this. Cool
ocalhoun
You should be fine installing two OS's on one drive as long as the first OS is not win2K or later.
Personaly, I like to install almost every package so I use 6GB just for the basic install!
zima
Hi, I am a Linux user since some time... I tried several different distribution and I would suggest to use Ubuntu: it's new, always very updated with the lastest versions of software and easy to use/install.

I suggest you as well to try a LiveCD before installing any distribution, so you can check the compatibility with your laptop (PCMCIA cards, Wireless and WinModems are not supported by Linux sometimes).

About the space, you should leave 10Gb at lest for windows... You can fit Ubuntu in 5Gb without istalling all the programs, but I suggest to have at least 10Gb as well.

Backup all your important data before partition your harddrive!
zima
ocalhoun wrote:
You should be fine installing two OS's on one drive as long as the first OS is not win2K or later.
Personaly, I like to install almost every package so I use 6GB just for the basic install!


I have WinXP and Linux on my harddrive and they work perfectly... WinXP doesn't even see that there is Linux on another partition, while Linux can read (and with a patch) write on the NT-filesystem...

Ofcourse it's better to have them on separate haddrives, but it's not very easy on laptops, is it? Smile
TheGeek
multiple OS's work fine on the same HDD.

I have slackware installed next to XP and it works fine...or did till i started messing with graphics settings and cant get out of the consol anymore....o well

but yea, iv heard really good things about a distribution called Linspire. Im going to install this on a computer i got the other day for my GF and im pretty sure if she can use it its good...lol.

But do what the first guy said. 10 gigs should be plenty...i did 30 and now i need to erase it cuz i need the space...but that aside good luck and let us know if you have any problems installing stuff.
LordSata
I think that depend... What kind of use do you with linux?
In my case i have 20Gb of disk-space.
Normally is a good thing that you leave minimum the double space for swap of your ram (in my case i have 512mb ram and 1024MB of swap). After that i have this partiotion:
/ (5GB)
/home (5Gb)
/tmp (1.5Gb)
/boot (100Mb)
/usr (4Gb)
/opt (3.4Gb)

NB: you canno't create partiotion for the directory /etc and /var . Yf you make this your linux-box can start and return to you a kernel panic. For security is best to divide the directory in various mount point. but if you have a personal linux-box that is usless Very Happy

I forget one thing: yes a dual boot system on the same hard-disk works fine, but remember that you must install lilo (or grub) in the master boot record Very Happy
palka
gonzo wrote:
I strongly advise you to install no more than ONE OS per physical drive unless you enjoy troubleshooting. As you are using a laptop this will be a bit more challenging. Now would be a good time for you to volunteer your cogent reasons for installing multiple OSs


OK . I have a single 40gb HD. I have win XP on 10GB. SuSE on 8GB, and Mandrake on 7GB, rest 15GB is FAT32 which all 3c OS's can "see". So thats where I store all the useful things that I need to acess like songs, documents etc. posting this on Mandrake which i use allways to access the internet. No problems for me
LordSata
Hi, if you would like to maintain your Windows system and in a partition Linux i beligve that you must have at minimum 20GB...
When you partition your hard disk:
2*RAM for the SWAP partition (i have 512MB ram -> 1G swap)
100MB for the mount point /boot
1G for the mount point /tmp
3.5GB for the mount point /opt
6GB for the mount point /
4.5GB for the mount point /usr
4GB for the mount point /home

I advise you that is best way to partition is different (not 20GB for the mount point /) for the security of the system (when you have used linux for a little bit of time undestand this Very Happy).

Use a journalled filesystem is best for the your data (if the light turn off without warning) the journal preserve your data (in most case... not in all)!

Bye, Lord
Naif
Are you going to setup a webserver on the laptop or on a different computer? To be able to connect and upload the pages to it, all you'll have to do is setup an ftp server. FTP servers are installed by default on most Linux distros.

How much space you would want to dedicate for Linux depends on what you plan to use it for. A full installation of most modern distros require a space ranging from 4/5 to 6/7 GB, give or take. 10 to 15 GB should be an idle allocation.
pccustoms
If you are really tight on space, you can boot Linux distros off LiveCD's. Not all linux distros support this however, and the features aren't as good as a full HDD installation.

If you want a smaller HDD installation, try using Damn Small Linux.

I personally like SuSE Linux the best, but I think it is around 5 CD's for installation. Also when you make an install, make sure you install ALL modules and don't leave anything out.
ocalhoun
pccustoms wrote:
I personally like SuSE Linux the best, but I think it is around 5 CD's for installation. Also when you make an install, make sure you install ALL modules and don't leave anything out.


The latest version of SuSE comes on 3 cd's and/or 2 dvd's
you install it with the cd's or the dvd's

Installing all modules from SuSE will use something like 6gigs (I should know), not good for the space concious.
Just install whatever you want, but be discerning about the package selection.
withaar
I am an exclusive linux user Smile,

The most efficient partition scheme has only 2 partitions, one for swap and one for the rest. There are some good reason for more complicated partitioning, but that applies primarily to servers.
djclue917
Ok so this is it. Please don't just post if you don't know what you are talking about.

* First, Linux can and may coexist peacefully with Windows. It doesn't matter what version of Windows or what distro of Linux you are using as long as you know what you are doing.

* You could install multiple OSes in one hard drive as long as you partition it right. As far as I know, you could have at most 2 primary partitions in one physical hard drive. The number of logical partitions is not a concern.

* Windows should be installed first unless you want to reinstall your bootloader (e.g. GRUB or LILO). This is because Windows would always write to the Master Boot Record (MBR) and destroy any previous entry written by your bootloader.

* Windows could not read Linux partitions (ext2, ext3, etc.) but Linux could read NTFS and read/write to FAT partitions. However, you could use a program in Windows called ext2fs or install the system driver to read ext2 or ext3 partitions.

* The number/type/size of partitions is all dependent on the user. Just consider all the necessary factors in deciding your partitioning scheme.

* Ubuntu has a great (and almost other Linux distro) hardware support. It has also good compatibility for laptops so don't worry about your wireless cards. However, Winmodems are still winmodems. They wouldn't work unless you install the correct driver. One more thing, the full installation of Ubuntu would require only at most 2 GB of disk space.

* You don't need to put all the mount points (except /var and /etc of course) in separate partitions. Two partitions would be fine (swap and /), but three would be better (swap, /, and /home). It all depends on the user.

* 100 MB for the /boot partition is insane unless you're planning to install plenty of kernels and initrds there. Mine is only 50MB and not even 25% of it is used.

* You could use ext2 for the /boot partition because it's only a very small parition. Also, you wouldn't need a separate partition for /boot if you are not planning to install multiple Linux distros.

* If you are just new to Linux, just create 3 partitions: swap, /, and /home. The size of swap will all depend on you. I will not say that it should be 2x or 3x because it would all depend on what kind of work you would be doing with your Linux box.

* I personally recommend K/Ubuntu if you are space-conscious and if you have a decent internet connection. K/Ubuntu just rocks! Smile

HTH

Darwin
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