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Is this correct grammar?





ocalhoun
So, on an online chat, my girlfriend sends to me:
"I have a hard time imagining being any different than I'm."

I immediately think, oh, that's wrong grammar, it should be "different than I am" ... But then I think for a moment... Is it wrong? I'm not sure! ... and to not be sure about a grammar rule is something a little novel for me, so I thought I'd ask.
Afaceinthematrix
Do not you know how to speak English?
Peterssidan
I thought "I'm" and "I am" was the same thing.
darthrevan
Peterssidan wrote:
I thought "I'm" and "I am" was the same thing.


It is the same thing, though I wouldn't use it at the end of a sentence either. I would say that it is possibly wrong. The way I tell if it sounds wrong. Usually works for me.
Ankhanu
If the question is about "I'm" at the end, I don't think it's really breaking a rule, but it is certainly awkward and to be avoided.

If the question is about the use of "any different" versus "different", I think, again, not wrong, but "any" is a redundancy, so should also be avoided.
standready
I do believe that using "I'm" at the end of a sentence is incorrect usage. Moody contractions usually don't end a sentence, do they?.
edit: The ad at the bottom of this topic for instant grammar checking says the sentence has a critical error.
SonLight
To my ear, the "I'm" at the end of the sentence clashes horribly and must be avoided at all costs. It seems that the the "am" needs to be emphatic, and putting it in a contraction weakens it.

The "any different", as compared to just different, I see as an acceptable choice. The "any" makes it sound much more informal (too reduntant, that?).

Since each person has a slightly different dialect of English, these pronouncements are absolutely authoritative for me. Your mileage may vary.
johans
ocalhoun wrote:
So, on an online chat, my girlfriend sends to me:
"I have a hard time imagining being any different than I'm."

I immediately think, oh, that's wrong grammar, it should be "different than I am" ... But then I think for a moment... Is it wrong? I'm not sure! ... and to not be sure about a grammar rule is something a little novel for me, so I thought I'd ask.


if you leave in USA grammar usually dont mind. Where if you are in different country such as asia pacific grammar are big deals.
deanhills
@Ocal. I think that's pretty good for an online chat. Chat leans itself to abbreviating words and compared with the usual standard of Internet abbreviations I've seen this one is harmless.

If it were an e-mail maybe one could pause and wonder about it, but to pause and wonder about it for chat, probably makes us a Grammar Nazi. Wink
Ankhanu
I don't think the context of nationality/culture, nor medium are at all important here. Ocalhoun is wondering only about grammaticality, e.g. what do the rules state; the rules are the rules and are not context dependent. It's pretty good for context X, doesn't really apply to the question.
deanhills
Ankhanu wrote:
I don't think the context of nationality/culture, nor medium are at all important here. Ocalhoun is wondering only about grammaticality, e.g. what do the rules state; the rules are the rules and are not context dependent. It's pretty good for context X, doesn't really apply to the question.
I understood perfectly, but thanks for interpreting it anyway Ankhanu.
edicalgerie
at my small knowledge of English, I think it's always the same to say "I'm or i am" in the end of a sentence
edicalgerie
johans wrote:
ocalhoun wrote:
So, on an online chat, my girlfriend sends to me:
"I have a hard time imagining being any different than I'm."

I immediately think, oh, that's wrong grammar, it should be "different than I am" ... But then I think for a moment... Is it wrong? I'm not sure! ... and to not be sure about a grammar rule is something a little novel for me, so I thought I'd ask.


if you leave in USA grammar usually dont mind. Where if you are in different country such as asia pacific grammar are big deals.



if you leave in USA or live in USA ??
RosenCruz
darthrevan wrote:
Peterssidan wrote:
I thought "I'm" and "I am" was the same thing.


It is the same thing, though I wouldn't use it at the end of a sentence either. I would say that it is possibly wrong. The way I tell if it sounds wrong. Usually works for me.



I agree with Peterssidan Arrow
drunkenkoz
"I am" and "I'm" are the same thing. Though it would be really awkward if someone used it at the end of all their sentences.
likeabreeze
I think "I am" is better than "I'm", because the tone is stronger.
"I'm" sounds relatively weak.
edicalgerie
may be you're right, or maybe you're wrong , i don't sure , it's just an idea
edicalgerie
i see that, this discussion its end ?
inuyasha
I don't really remember when, but I seemed to be told that short forms like I'm, you're can't be used at the end of a sentence. It sounds unnatural to me.
nepalstar
ocalhoun wrote:
So, on an online chat, my girlfriend sends to me:
"I have a hard time imagining being any different than I'm."

I immediately think, oh, that's wrong grammar, it should be "different than I am" ... But then I think for a moment... Is it wrong? I'm not sure! ... and to not be sure about a grammar rule is something a little novel for me, so I thought I'd ask.


As you told, I'm also think that should be "I am" instead of "I'm" but I'm also not sure...
GuidanceReader
Biber, Conrad & Leech in the Longman Student Grammar of Spoken and Written English (2002) have this paragraph on verb contractions, although it doesn't explain why, it does state that there is a rule regarding just before a full stop, comma, colon:

Quote:
Verb contraction needs a preceding 'host' in the clause. Usually the host is a pronoun (e.g. I'm, you'd she'll, that's). But many other forms preceding a verb can serve as host, including full nouns, wh-words, and there .... If there is no preceding host, e.g. with yes/no questions, then there is no possibility of verb contraction ... Similarly, verbs in clause-final position cannot be contracted. For example:
I don't know what it is. <but not: *I don't know what it's.>

In addition, when the noun phrase preceding the verb is complex (e.g. where it contains a postmodifier) it rarely serves as a host to a verb contraction.
deanhills
@Guidance. That's a winner for this thread! Sort of well put text book explanation for what most people seemed to have sensed but could not quite put their finger on.
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