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target shooting pistol





Marcuzzo
Hi guys,
about 6 months ago I started to go to the local shooting range and now I've got my shooting license ( sportschutterslicentie ).
this allows me to purchase several types firearms like
- .22LR chambered semi-automatic pistols.
- repeating ( lever/bolt action ) rifles of any type of caliber.
- shotguns ( non repeating )

now, I'm looking to get a good pistol because I've gotten tired of the buckmarks they let us shoot at the range.
Don't get me wrong, these are good pistols, to give you an example, on my practical exam I shot 48/50 ( 5 rounds at 25meters)
but since I don't own it I can't realy set the sights the way I want and to be honest they don't look that cool.

this is also another issue that I need to figure out.
I'm looking for a cool looking target pistol that is durable and acurate

anybody want to share his/her experience with 22LR pistols?



EDIT: I've requested a license for a 9mm pistol but it can take up to 7 months before the gouvernor approves this so please don't say stuff like "get a real gun like a 9mil or a 45"
I've shot plenty of 9mm pistols and even the Colt 1911 .45 ACP, which are fun to shoot but expensive.
and for those wondering, I'm getting the Beretta 92FS.
keep it in mind that this topic is about a .22LR pistol and target shooting, not personal defence
ocalhoun
You want a .22 pistol for competition, or just for having fun with?

The competition ones can get quite fancy and expensive, but they are very nice and unbelievably accurate... Though the highest-end ones will actually be bolt-action, as that offers greater accuracy than a semi-auto design.

For the just for fun ones, there's all kinds of course, and a lot of them are a lot of fun. I'd want to test any of them out thoroughly before buying though, because as with any small semi-auto, they can be prone to jamming if not very well designed and manufactured.

...In either case, and for any pistol, it's really important that it fit your hand well, so there's no single design that's perfect for everybody.

(And if you can get a bolt action rifle of any caliber... I'd highly recommend trying out a mosin nagant. Very cheap, extremely durable, as useful as a bolt action rifle can be, and very fun, they're a great bargain and a really interesting historical piece.)

Do you have gun stores where you can just walk in and try handling the various options you have? (Or better yet, one with an attached range that will let you shoot them before you buy?)
Marcuzzo
The range where I go and shoot has a small shop but unfortunately they don't have any "test" models. which I don't like, feels like buying a car without a test drive.
I did find another shop with a bigger collection in firearms but they don't have a range.
I think it will be hard to find a good shop in Belgium where one can go to the store and test a few pistols before buying Sad
either way, what I'm looking for is something between a good plinker and a competition model.
I've watched a lot of reviews on youtube and it all comes down to the same.
cheap plinkers like the walther P22 usualy have plastic components that have a tendency to break and have a lot of other malfunctions depending on the rounds used, like failure to feed or extract.
and on the other hand there are the high end pistols like Hammerli's which are good and durable pistols with little or no malfunctions but these can go for 1500 - 2000 which is too expensive for me.
And then there are the mid-price pistols like the browning buckmark, I've been shooting the standard URX mostly and it is a good pistol, never had any malfunctions and it's pretty accurate.
I'm thinkin that I will go with that one, probably the one with the rosewood udx grips, and once I get my permit for the 9mm beretta I'll also get the .22 conversion kit.


ocalhoun wrote:
(And if you can get a bolt action rifle of any caliber... I'd highly recommend trying out a mosin nagant. Very cheap, extremely durable, as useful as a bolt action rifle can be, and very fun, they're a great bargain and a really interesting historical piece.)

yes, Smile I noticed that one in your collection of firearms.
are the 7,62 x 54 rounds expensive?
not sure what the prices are in the US but to give you an idea what I pay for pistol rounds.
these are boxes of 50 rounds
- .22 rounds : 3
- 9mm winchester: 9
- .45 ACP : 21
ocalhoun
Marcuzzo wrote:

And then there are the mid-price pistols like the browning buckmark,

Sounds good... I don't have any experience with that particular one, but it looks pretty decent.

And your idea of getting a mid-range one is very reasonable.
Quote:

are the 7,62 x 54 rounds expensive?
not sure what the prices are in the US but to give you an idea what I pay for pistol rounds.
these are boxes of 50 rounds
- .22 rounds : 3
- 9mm winchester: 9
- .45 ACP : 21

That's the beautiful thing... if you can find some of the surplus (corrosive) ammo, it's extremely cheap.
I got 880 rounds for $76 (58) when I bought it, so per 50, it would be only 3.20 ... it can be hard to find, even in the US though, and it's usually only available in tins of 440 or more.
(And when using the corrosive ammo, you have to first clean the gun with water, then clean the gun with oil... and you need to do it within hours after shooting, or the corrosive chemicals in the primers will rust out the barrel and bolt. -- But as long as you clean it properly, corrosive ammo won't hurt the gun at all. Everybody used it before noncorrosive primers were invented.)
It's a beautiful thing to be able to shoot a high-powered rifle for the same cost of shooting a .22!
(The 7.62x54r does deliver a very satisfying punch. It's similar in power to a .303 or 30-06 and as far as commonly used rounds go, only the .338, 12.7mm*, and 50bmg really outclass it.)

Modern (non-corrosive) current-production ammo for it usually runs $10 (7.70) for a 20-round box here in the US, so that would be 19.25 per 50.
...It is worth getting the modern stuff sometimes though, since it allows you to shoot without cleaning it right away, and it allows you to get more ammunition varieties like soft point bullets.
(The surplus is usually only available in steel-core FMJ ... very effective at armor-piercing, but doesn't have the spectacular effect on soft targets that soft point rounds do.)

Of course, though, those are US prices. The actual prices may vary wildly between different countries.

*soviet equivalent of .50 bmg
Quote:
- 9mm winchester: 9

Also, as a side note... I've never heard it called '9mm winchester' Is that the same one that's called 9mm luger and 9mm parabellum, or is it something more unusual?
*thinks*
Hm... the .380 ACP is sometimes called '9mm short' Maybe '9mm winchester' is a european term for .380?
Marcuzzo
I'll be looking for these surplus rounds then Very Happy

ocalhoun wrote:
Also, as a side note... I've never heard it called '9mm winchester' Is that the same one that's called 9mm luger and 9mm parabellum, or is it something more unusual?
*thinks*
Hm... the .380 ACP is sometimes called '9mm short' Maybe '9mm winchester' is a european term for .380?

sorry, my mistake.
I added "winchester" to it because the range sell's several 9mm rounds and these are the cheapest.
I did mean the 9mm luger ( or parabellum or 9x19mm).
the .380 ACP is 9X17 ( I think )

I will definitely be looking into those surplus rounds
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