FRIHOSTFORUMSSEARCHFAQTOSBLOGSCOMPETITIONS
You are invited to Log in or Register a free Frihost Account!


Who can do this amazing water trick?





Bondings


It took me over 15 tries to get it working and the water spilled anyway before I could take a picture of it (it held maybe 10 seconds at most). Anyone here who can do a better job of it than me?
Ghost Rider103
That is incredible!

I'm tempted to try, but I really don't feel like making a mess of water as I'm sure I would fail numerous times lol.
deanhills
Before you try the "Amazing Water Trick" .... Very Happy

Asap170
Wow that is awesome! It's like Jello, but it is water!!! I kinda want to try this now.
Cosmoslayer
Woah, that is cool! I have to find a smooth SPACEY surface first. LOL
chatrack
Hi,

That twisting while on start need to be quick! and there may be something jelly like thing pasted inside the glass before the event to demonstration. Any way its a good trick and need excellent practice to do in front of live audience.
Asap170
chatrack wrote:
Hi,

That twisting while on start need to be quick! and there may be something jelly like thing pasted inside the glass before the event to demonstration. Any way its a good trick and need excellent practice to do in front of live audience.


But Bondings was able to do it though it didn't last for long. So it is possible unless he cheated.
chatrack
I think it is a magical one
menino
I don't think that this is possible as demonstrated in the video.
I think its just a trick, using video editing and maipulation software to get it that way.

Whoever got suckered into it, probably wasted lots of water, unless they tried it near a lake, using the lake water.
Still, it got me interested in trying it.
Asap170
menino wrote:
I don't think that this is possible as demonstrated in the video.
I think its just a trick, using video editing and maipulation software to get it that way.

Whoever got suckered into it, probably wasted lots of water, unless they tried it near a lake, using the lake water.
Still, it got me interested in trying it.


Bindings said he got it....Maybe some editing to make it last longer,but I don't know since Bondings was able to do so then I believe him.
SonLight
Urban legend, most likely. You probably need to rotate the glass clockwise in the Northern Hemisphere; counterclockwise in the Southern Hemisphere.
deanhills
SonLight wrote:
Urban legend, most likely. You probably need to rotate the glass clockwise in the Northern Hemisphere; counterclockwise in the Southern Hemisphere.
Laughing Good one. The best one so far I think.
hakaner
Wow that is really amazing...
standready
That looks very interesting. I might try it tomorrow - outside during the rain storm. Laughing
the-guide
After about fifteen failing, finally I can done but can't kept it stay long last because my vibration. Laughing

.
.
.
cybersa
Really Amazing!.
Then how it can be possible?
Any Idea?
Asap170
I forgot the name, but like if you but a drop of water on a table that drop will stay in the place you put it until some force, a human, touches it. Its one of the properties of water.
the-guide
cybersa wrote:
Really Amazing!.
Then how it can be possible?
Any Idea?


I just found the good explanation here:
http://www.physicscentral.com/experiment/physicsathome/magicwaterglass.cfm

In summary, the card doesn’t fall down because of the difference in pressure between inside and outside of the glass and it doesn’t slide off because of surface tension and adhesion.

It might look like magic, but it’s really science.

.
.
.
deanhills
I don't think any one was disputing the card trick. It was the glass of water standing without the glass around it that was interesting. Sort of defying the laws of gravity completely. Very Happy
SonLight
Asap170 wrote:
I forgot the name, but like if you but a drop of water on a table that drop will stay in the place you put it until some force, a human, touches it. Its one of the properties of water.


It's called "surface tension". It works very well for a single drop, but the force is not strong enough to overcome gravity for a large amount of water. It also depends what material the water is placed on. Some materials attract and/or absorb water; others resist contact with water. A good furniture wax is ideal, because it is specifically designed to keep any water from being absorbed by the table.
VaderX
I did this and it held for a minute. I had like 17 tries at it before I done it.
cybersa
Still i can't able to do.
What i'm doing is simultaneously twisting and moving up the glass?
Any Tips?
Aredon
SonLight wrote:
Asap170 wrote:
I forgot the name, but like if you but a drop of water on a table that drop will stay in the place you put it until some force, a human, touches it. Its one of the properties of water.


It's called "surface tension". It works very well for a single drop, but the force is not strong enough to overcome gravity for a large amount of water. It also depends what material the water is placed on. Some materials attract and/or absorb water; others resist contact with water. A good furniture wax is ideal, because it is specifically designed to keep any water from being absorbed by the table.


Not to mention the fact that he introduced a spin to the water, which would easily overcome surface tension. Things that spin have an outward tangential velocity, without something to push on the water would simply fly outward every time you removed the barrier. This is 100% a hoax. You might think of swinging a bucket around in a circle and then letting go. Does it stay orbiting your arm? Of course not...

Even if you look at it from the perspective of viscosity, water is not nearly viscous enough to overcome BOTH gravity and the outward velocity.



Remove the Centripetal force (the cup), and the velocity carries each water particle outward in a straight line from where it was when the cup was removed.

Helios
I bet Bondings sits and wonders how many people got their tables wet Razz
Bondings
Helios wrote:
I bet Bondings sits and wonders how many people got their tables wet Razz

Ok, I guess I have to admit it. I wasn't able to do this trick as it isn't physically possible under these circumstances (it might be easy in the ISS though).

In reality the guy in the video created some amazing cgi. At least to me it looks perfectly like what I would expect it to look. Although if you look closely, you can notice that at the moment he supposedly touches the water to make it spill, you can see that there is more than a centimeter between his fingers and the water when it loses its structure.
Aredon
Bondings wrote:
Helios wrote:
I bet Bondings sits and wonders how many people got their tables wet Razz

Ok, I guess I have to admit it. I wasn't able to do this trick as it isn't physically possible under these circumstances (it might be easy in the ISS though).

Ahh! Now that I could see. However... It would likely slowly become a sphere. I doubt surface tension would make it remain in the cup shape for long. You also wouldn't want to spin it...
sonam
If this is not video trick (I think it is) maybe he using some type of another glass in this glass. I was thinking maybe some type of PVC folio, for example like this very thin what we are using in fridge or on airport for packing baggage. Question: are this folio enough hard to keep weather in this position. I don't think so. Rolling Eyes

Sonam
Bondings
sonam wrote:
If this is not video trick (I think it is) maybe he using some type of another glass in this glass. I was thinking maybe some type of PVC folio, for example like this very thin what we are using in fridge or on airport for packing baggage. Question: are this folio enough hard to keep weather in this position. I don't think so. Rolling Eyes

Sonam

It's cgi (computer generated images).
nepalstar
Bondings wrote:


It took me over 15 tries to get it working and the water spilled anyway before I could take a picture of it (it held maybe 10 seconds at most). Anyone here who can do a better job of it than me?


Wow...! that's really amazing...! is that real one?? I never saw this trick...! Amazing.. amazing...! thanks for uploading this video...
manfer
It is really good. Makes one feel it just happened.
IceCreamTruck
Bondings wrote:
sonam wrote:
If this is not video trick (I think it is) maybe he using some type of another glass in this glass. I was thinking maybe some type of PVC folio, for example like this very thin what we are using in fridge or on airport for packing baggage. Question: are this folio enough hard to keep weather in this position. I don't think so. Rolling Eyes

Sonam

It's cgi (computer generated images).



Haha, and the truth comes out. When you said you got this to work I simply wondered how long it was going to be before you came back online and had your "gotcha" moment! Smile Funny Bondings.

BTW, IF this were possible there would be no difference between the definition of a solid and a liquid when it comes to water. A liquid, by definition, fills the bottom of the container in which it is held, and if you increase the size of the container to the room, then the water flows to the bottom which is the floor. A solid, however, retains it's shape, and does not conform to the boundaries of the container, and this would be what has to happen for this trick to be true.

It's a really convincing video, however, as he's even given the water a slight swirling motion as if it is still reacting to the removal of the glass. He says that it will fall for no reason, or for a vibration that is too small to detect, so it's a moot point that his finger never touches the water. He never says that his finger caused it to crash, so that is an assumption that everyone is making, and nothing in the video says he touched the water.

He's begging to be sued for damages though. I wonder how many carpets out in the world are molding right now because of this silly hoax. Or how many gallons of distilled water people have purchased and dumped all over their apartments attempting to make this work.

Here's a real trick: wiskey/water trick

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=96NFH2Z7GSA

Now that is physically possible, and a good bar trick.
Bondings
IceCreamTruck wrote:
BTW, IF this were possible there would be no difference between the definition of a solid and a liquid when it comes to water. A liquid, by definition, fills the bottom of the container in which it is held, and if you increase the size of the container to the room, then the water flows to the bottom which is the floor. A solid, however, retains it's shape, and does not conform to the boundaries of the container, and this would be what has to happen for this trick to be true.

It's not really that simple. What you are saying is only true for a perfect liquid (I mean no viscosity, no forces between the molecules that can keep them in a bubble) and with gravity.

In reality, similar things are definitely possible with liquids - just not with pure water. And even with water it is possible, just not on this scale (a droplet can stay the same shape without losing its structure). Some liquids like Oobleck have very strange properties ( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yHlAcASsf6U ) and they react to sound waves by forming pillar-like shapes.
IceCreamTruck
Bondings wrote:
IceCreamTruck wrote:
BTW, IF this were possible there would be no difference between the definition of a solid and a liquid when it comes to water. A liquid, by definition, fills the bottom of the container in which it is held, and if you increase the size of the container to the room, then the water flows to the bottom which is the floor. A solid, however, retains it's shape, and does not conform to the boundaries of the container, and this would be what has to happen for this trick to be true.

It's not really that simple. What you are saying is only true for a perfect liquid (I mean no viscosity, no forces between the molecules that can keep them in a bubble) and with gravity.

In reality, similar things are definitely possible with liquids - just not with pure water. And even with water it is possible, just not on this scale (a droplet can stay the same shape without losing its structure). Some liquids like Oobleck have very strange properties ( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yHlAcASsf6U ) and they react to sound waves by forming pillar-like shapes.


These are common definitions used in class rooms, however, at the quantum level, for instance, liquids and solids behavior is not very different at all. These definitions of liquids and solids fit the scale of the experiment being performed, and are appropriate for this case. I realize that these definitions are not always true, however, I was just required to learned them and I did not put them into place.
Related topics
in interesting math problem
My list of musics
Frankfurt Motor Show, 2005
What was the most AMAZING thing you have ever done in life ?
Criss Angel - walking on water....know how he does it?
Drink more water
Making Drinkable Water through Chemical Means
Teaching methods
Japanese Car - Water as fuel!
magic debunked, skeptic's special:
Left brain V Right brain
panick attack...do u know these?
New forum about amazing constructions
Hiking and camping
Reply to topic    Frihost Forum Index -> General -> General Chat

FRIHOST HOME | FAQ | TOS | ABOUT US | CONTACT US | SITE MAP
© 2005-2011 Frihost, forums powered by phpBB.