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Edgar Alan Poe





gnomme
who likes??
rip8fan1
I've not read much (of Poe), but the first scary thing I ever read was "The Tell-Tale Heart", and it was great!!!

In the future, I hope to read:
"The Fall Of The House Of Usher"
and
"The Masque Of The Red Death"

as I've heard a lot about them.
quick_basic
I like him. Read almost everything that has been published.
supjapscrapper
gnomme wrote:
who likes??


He's one of the biggest writers ever. his writings are famous all around the world; and he was quite an adventurer as well ! a big man. I don't know about his ideals or convictions, but up to now, interesting man...
lycadia
Especially his poetry, though I sometimes think his short stories are better known. Yet, very few people seem to realize he wrote the first modern detective story in Murders in the Rue Morgue. I love Hop Frog and The Cask of Amontillado for the sheer vengeful pleasure of them, I love Fall of the House of Usher and Ligeia for their mood. One of my Lit. teachers has a set of works by Poe on record, read by Basil Rathbone, who played Sherlock Holmes in some of the best film adaptations of the Holmes stories. It’s _fabulous_ and I fully intend to track down a set someday, even if I have to buy a record player just to listen to them. My best friend read “Alone” as the epigraph to her Salutatorian speech. It’s so evocative of how I (and she) often felt and sometimes still do. He’s an artist of the alienated, beyond any doubt.


Here are some links to free Poe on the Web, in case they are of any interest to anyone.

http://www.poetryloverspage.com/poets/poe/poe_ind.html

http://bau2.uibk.ac.at/sg/poe/Work.html

http://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/webbin/gutbook/author?name=Poe%2C%20Edgar%20Allan%2C%201809-1849
Camel
supjapscrapper wrote:

He's one of the biggest writers ever. his writings are famous all around the world; and he was quite an adventurer as well ! a big man. I don't know about his ideals or convictions, but up to now, interesting man...


Yeh, I like very much Poe's poetry. Twisted Evil
SagMan
We learned his poets in our English lessons...
Dean_The_Great
I love Edgar Allan Poe. I own everything he has ever written and I've read it twice over. The short stories are of a particular fascination to me. I find that Poe tends to deliver vivid imagery and brilliant and complex plots that are resevered for verse (for imagery) and novels (for plots). I find that many of Poe's short stories have an interesting view of fictional science. Poe will often explain the science of the story at length, so much so that you almost believe it to be true.

An excellent example of this is in the story "The Unparalelled Adventure of One Hans Pfaall". It is not one of his more well-known pieces, but very interesting none-the-less. The story tells of Hans Pfaall's ride to the moon in a balloon and the complications that arose from trying to do it. It talks of the atmosphere thinning, and the gravity difference, and ballast needed to regulate flight speed... all very interesting, yet mostly fictional, science. It is this believability through imagery that I enjoy so very much. I highly recommend those who don't know his short stories to read some. "The Cask of Amontillado" is an old classic and very well known (It was parodied by the Simpsons, as was "The Raven").
gOOdkid
He scares me a little, but I love the literature he wrote on how him and his beloved cousin had a love that was like no love anyone has ever seen before "Annabel Lee"
Di
he is scary Laughing
but i love his poem 'the raven', especially since tim burton quoted him in his short film 'vincent'
Masochistic Tendencies
Di wrote:
he is scary Laughing
but i love his poem 'the raven', especially since tim burton quoted him in his short film 'vincent'


>.> He is not scary. He is an awesome writer...just alittle twisted Twisted Evil but aren't we all?
Ihatebabysitting
I HATE POE!!

He is the most depressing man alive. How can anyone like to hear his poems???

They are all about suicide and lost love.

I especially hate The Bells.
Masochistic Tendencies
Ihatebabysitting wrote:
I HATE POE!!

He is the most depressing man alive. How can anyone like to hear his poems???

They are all about suicide and lost love.

I especially hate The Bells.


Uh if you haven't noticed...People like Poe because he speaks the truth. The world is not freaking butterflies and rainbows...>.> Naive.
AardvarkSagus
I have read a lot of Poe's short poems. Very depressing. It takes a twisted mind to come up with some of the scenarios that you find in his works. At the same time though he is a very capable writer and extremely verbose at writing. I enjoy but shun his work.
nakamaru
That dude was crazy and a drug addict to boot.
Masochistic Tendencies
nakamaru wrote:
That dude was crazy and a drug addict to boot.


Your trying to tell me you dont know anyone who is a drug addict. We have those all over so dont point it out like it really means something.
lycadia
He definately isn't for everyone. Obviously, people who don't want to work a little harder to understand it, or people who don't like unhappy endings or stories about the things that fascinated him aren't going to like it. The same is true for most really groundbreaking authors.
I was always one of the few who really readily understood and appreciated him, in my lit classes, even well into University. Even those who got it, tended to fixate on how verbose or how macabre it was. I truly think if more people _heard_ rather than read his poetry, or were given a rundown of the plot and a wider vocabulary before being presented with his stories, they might be appreciated more, but some people will simply never like it and some will never get it. Such is life, I suppose.
Those who are affected by his writing, who fully appreciate it, tend to find it to me much richer and more beautiful than it seems on the surface.
There were certain foods my mother would tell me were "a aquired taste", shellfish, certain sauces, things that she loved but that I either refused to try or tried and found strange. I think Poe is an aquired literary taste. Rereading always beings new nuances, new subtle facets out. The more familar it is, the most easily it comes, the more readily it's understood and that makes it much easier to focus on the real artistry there.
What really depresses me is that most people no longer have the vocabulary or reading comprehension to treat Poe like anything other than drudgery or appreciation of meter and poetic convention to see it is as anything more than "creepy". The focus people who dislike Poe view Poe with tends to be, in my opinion, all wrong.
Take for example, his personal problems -which were more a matter of alchohol than drugs, and the drug he did use was NOT illegal or uncommon at the time... morphine and opium were both common ingrediants in patent medicines, in fact- or his romantic ties. Why are these -all too common- personal pecularities even mentioned in a discussion of his work? Yet, they always are. How on earth does that detract from the nature of his craft? Yes, an understanding of the man can aid in deepening an understanding of his work, of what his writings might have meant to him, but that's never the context it's mentioned in. It's always trite sensationalism. I swear I think high school english tachers tell thier students these things to try and make it more scandelous and exciting, rather then teaching them what they need to know to fully understand.
Bah, I'm probably not even expressing myself well now, but it does vex me to see such casual dismissal of an artist.
jason11350
People these days are just too lazy to read stuff like Poe's.
palavra
i like
when i was in high school
i read all his books that translated to turkish language
TurtleShell
I agree--poe had a lot more going on than what might be perceived on the surface. I can't say he's one of my favorites, but certain works of his have always stood out for me. my favorite might be the Haunted Palace...


And travelers, now, within that valley
Through the red-litten windows see
Vast forms that move fantastically
To a discordant melody,
While, like a ghastly, rapid river,
Through the pale door
A hideous throng rush out forever
And laugh--but smile no more.


It's that last line I especially love. He certainly does know how to hit that one wrong, sharp note, doesn't he? Anyway, again--he isn't one of my favorites but I do appreciate his style and subtle artistic sensibilities. There's something to be said for turning that partially opened door or that strange chill or that smiling lunatic into something sinister and still undefined.
Traveller
Big fan of Poe, here. back in middle school, I actually was able to recite the entire "The Raven" from memory, but I haven't kept practising it, so I now can only go for about four stanzas, and a few other lines and stanzas here and there. I can still give a pretty good dramatic reading of the opening of "The Telltale Heart," from memory, though.
Montressor
lycadia wrote:
Even those who got it, tended to fixate on how verbose or how macabre it was. I truly think if more people _heard_ rather than read his poetry, or were given a rundown of the plot and a wider vocabulary before being presented with his stories, they might be appreciated more, but some people will simply never like it and some will never get it. Such is life, I suppose.


I tend to find that the case when I mention that I've read Frankenstein, people are fixated on the horror and distasteful aspects of the work even though these are only a part of the whole work and miss the greater picture altogether. Few people understand that Frankenstein was not an overly wrathful creature at first, but instead they only know of a monster who detests his creator. It is an unfortunate downfall of such classical writers like Shelly and Poe that they so successfully use the "ugly" aspects of their stories as an integral part to offer a more vividly illustrate their main points or central theme.

As far as style, personally I enjoy both the seeming monotone and calm recitations of the condemned (like in "The Black Cat" and "The Cask of Amontillado"), and the ravings of the characters who know of their demise and are all the more crazed because of it (like "The Tell-Tale Heart).
TexasWes
I think to truly appreciate the work of Poe, you must take it in the context...not words, but circa. During Poe's career, there was no radio, TV, movies, DVD (you get the idea?), making the written word (as well as "recitals" very popular entertainment. His mastery of description is clear in all of his works, and yes...he was on the cutting edge of his day. If you consider him the Stephen King of the 1800's, you'd be close to understanding him. Let me paraphrase some of the posted comments made towards Poe, and see if they apply to Stephen King.
"...the seeming monotone and calm recitations of the condemned," "...the ravings of the characters who know of their demise...", "...turning that partially opened door or that strange chill or that smiling lunatic into something sinister and still undefined", "It takes a twisted mind to come up with some of the scenarios that you find in his works". Need I go on?
Yes...just like a great actor playing a villain in a movie...if they're a really good actor, you hate them and associate their performance with them.
He is well-known for his horror stories, but he also wrote mysteries (The Purloined Letter), pirate stories (The Gold Bug), comedy's (The System of Dr. Tarr and Proffessor Fedder), and of course, poems.
I agree he's not for everyone, but going into his works with an open mind (as well as a reference to who his audience was) will give you a better understanding of one of our great American authors.
djcaution
Poetry does not tickle my fancy in the least, but I love Edgar Alan Poe's work. Firstly, we share the same first name lol, but what sells me is "The Raven". That is my favourite piece of poetry of all time I love it. When reading it you just start reading faster and faster cuz u get all into it the way it flows its great!
.Locke
I like most of his works, especially The Pit and the Pendellum (sp?), Nevermore, and Tell Tale Heart. But as for The Gold Bug, I really didn't get into it that much it just didn't keep my interest.

All of his other works that I have read (I've read a lot of his works) I really like, but I just *sadly* can't call them all my favorites.
evanc88
He claimed himself to be a poet, not a short story writer, which I find ironic considering he's basically only known for his short stories (with the exception of the poems "The Raven," "Annabel Lee," and "To Helen--"). Personally I like his poetry a lot more than his prose but he was a brilliant writer regardless of his actions and life.
BooTes
I only know "The Raven" but I love it, very atmospheric, dreary and has a great end.
Droop
gnomme wrote:
who likes??


I doo very very much why do you not like thee?
adomicilio
Oh my God! Edgar Allan Poe was a grate writer. I really like his tales, I think he isn't scary or something like that, I think hi tried to explain the human nature in one of its own reality across the most painful feelings. I thing he looking for get the reader to very sensitive world, he express the ungry, misery, lonelyness, sad... But, who can live without these feelingss? What kind of life could be if it doesn't exist? I said, this is a great writer! But I don't think just one way exists, we have a lot of options: be happy? be sad? it´s a moment question!

I'm a pretty normal Colombian girl and I really like to read him and I enjoyed very much "The mask of Read Death".

Bye
Droop
He never answered Sad i really wanted to know what he thinks or why he would ask such a questoin ??
adomicilio
Take this kiss upon the brow!
And, in parting from you now,
Thus much let me avow-
You are not wrong, who deem
That my days have been a dream;
Yet if hope has flown away
In a night, or in a day,
In a vision, or in none,
Is it therefore the less gone?
All that we see or seem
Is but a dream within a dream.

I stand amid the roar
Of a surf-tormented shore,
And I hold within my hand
Grains of the golden sand-
How few! yet how they creep
Through my fingers to the deep,
While I weep- while I weep!
O God! can I not grasp
Them with a tighter clasp?
O God! can I not save
One from the pitiless wave?
Is all that we see or seem
But a dream within a dream?
adomicilio
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Edgar Allan Poe was born January 19, 1809 in Boston, where his mother had been employed as an actress. Elizabeth Arnold Poe died in Richmond on December 8, 1811, and Edgar was taken into the family of John Allan, a member of the firm of Ellis and Allan, tobacco-merchants.
Poe's mother, Elizabeth Arnold Poe, died in Richmond on December 8, 1811.

After attending schools in England and Richmond, young Poe registered at the University of Virginia on February 14, 1826, the second session of the University. He lived in Room 13, West Range. He became an active member of the Jefferson Literary Society, and passed his courses with good grades at the end of the session in December. Mr. Allan failed to give him enough money for necessary expenses, and Poe made debts of which his so-called father did not approve. When Mr. Allan refused to let him return to the University, a quarrel ensued, and Poe was driven from the Allan home without money. Mr. Allan probably sent him a little money later, and Poe went to Boston. There he published a little volume of poetry, Tamerlane and Other Poems. It is such a rare book now that a single copy has sold for $200,000.00
Moldavia, Poe's last home in Richmond located at Fifth and Main Streets. John Allan bought the house in 1825, and Edgar lived there before entering the University of Virginia in 1826.

In Boston on May 26, 1827, Poe enlisted in The United States Army as a private using the name Edgar A. Perry. After two years of service, during which he was promoted to the rank of Sergeant-major, he secured, with Mr. Allan's aid, a discharge from the Army and went to Baltimore. He lived there with his aunt, Mrs. Maria Poe Clemm, on the small amounts of money sent by Mr. Allan until he received an appointment to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point.

Meanwhile, Poe published a second book of poetry in 1829: Al Aaraaf, Tamerlane and Minor Poems. After another quarrel with Allan (who had married a second wife in 1830), Poe no longer received aid from his foster father. Poe then took the only method of release from the Academy, and got himself dismissed on March 6, 1831.

Soon after Poe left West Point, a third volume appeared: Poems by Edgar Allan Poe, Second Edition. While living in Baltimore with his aunt, Mrs. Clemm, young Poe began writing prose tales. Five of these appeared in the Philadelphia Saturday Courier in 1832.

With the December issue of 1835, Poe began editing the Southern Literary Messenger for Thomas W. White in Richmond; he held this position until January, 1837. During this time, Poe married his young cousin, Virginia Clemm in Richmond on May 16, 1836.

Poe's slashing reviews and sensational tales made him widely known as an author; however, he failed to find a publisher for a volume of burlesque tales, Tales of the Folio Club. Harpers did, however, print his book-length narrative, Arthur Gordon Pym in July of 1838.

Little is known about Poe's life after he left the Messenger; however, in 1838 he went to Philadelphia where he lived for six years. He was an editor of Burton's Gentleman's Magazine from July, 1839 to June, 1840, and of Graham's Magazine from April, 1841 to May, 1842. In April, 1844, with barely car fare for his family of three, [including his aunt, Virginia's mother, who lived with them], Poe went to New York where he found work on the New York Evening Mirror.

In 1840, Poe's Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque was published in two volumes in Philadelphia. In 1845, Poe became famous with the spectacular success of his poem "The Raven," and in March of that year, he joined C. F. Briggs in an effort to publish The Broadway Journal. Also in 1845,Wiley and Putnam issued Tales by Edgar A. Poe and The Raven and Other Poems.

The year 1846 was a tragic one. Poe rented the little cottage at Fordham, where he lived the last three years of his life. The Broadway Journal failed, and Virginia became very ill and died on January 30, 1847. After his wife's death, Poe perhaps yielded more often to a weakness for drink, which had beset him at intervals since early manhood. He was unable to take even a little alcohol without a change of personality, and any excess was accompanied by physical prostration. Throughout his life those illnesses had interferred with his success as an editor, and had given him a reputation for intemperateness that he scarcely deserved.

In his latter years, Poe was interested in several women. They included the poetess, Mrs. Sarah Helen Whitman, Mrs. Charles Richmond, and the widow, Mrs. Sarah Elmira Shelton, whom he had known in his boyhood as Miss Royster.

The circumstances of Poe's death remain a mystery. After a visit to Norfolk and Richmond for lectures, he was found in Baltimore in a pitiable condition and taken unconscious to a hospital where he died on Sunday, October 7, 1849. He was buried in the yard of Westminster Presbyterian Church in Baltimore, Maryland.

In personal appearance, Poe was a quiet, shy-looking but handsome man; he was slightly built, and was five feet, eight inches in height. His mouth was considered beautiful. His eyes, with long dark lashes, were hazel-gray.
moonblade
I love Poe's works, and must admit right away that they influence a lot of my own short stories... The atmosphere of suspense that he is able to create is brilliant, and the ideas of certain of his stories are simply too compelling to ignore. Furthermore, he is now considered to be the father figure of modern crime fiction by many scholars, having preceded Sir Arthur Conan Doyle with his own vision of an analytical and deductive genius detective.

Granted, Poe's works are not at all happy-shiny, but then again, he does have his share of works that either poke fun at literature, sciences or journalism, or are just social criticism coated in ironic discourse. And of course, considering Poe's biography, one would not at all be surprised that he wrote on depressive issues.
evanc88
Edgar Allan Poe wrote:
Take this kiss upon the brow!
And, in parting from you now,
Thus much let me avow-
You are not wrong, who deem
That my days have been a dream;
Yet if hope has flown away
In a night, or in a day,
In a vision, or in none,
Is it therefore the less gone?
All that we see or seem
Is but a dream within a dream.

I stand amid the roar
Of a surf-tormented shore,
And I hold within my hand
Grains of the golden sand-
How few! yet how they creep
Through my fingers to the deep,
While I weep- while I weep!
O God! can I not grasp
Them with a tighter clasp?
O God! can I not save
One from the pitiless wave?
Is all that we see or seem
But a dream within a dream?


This is actually my favorite Poe poem.
Fright Knight
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The Cask of Amontillado is a good one. Definitely he knows how to become a very good killer.



Montresor tells the story of the night, half a century before, that he took his revenge on Fortunato, an Italian nobleman. Angry over some unspecified insult, he plots to murder his friend, then finds the perfect opportunity to carry out his plan when he finds him drunk and wearing motley at the carnival.

He baits Fortunato by telling him he has obtained, out of season, what he believes to be a pipe of Amontillado (a Spanish sherry); he isn't sure, however, and wants his friend's expert opinion on the subject. Fortunato goes with Montresor to the wine cellars of the latter's palazzo, where they wander deep underground in the catacombs. The two continue drinking; at one point, Fortunato makes an elaborate, and, to the narrator's eyes, grotesque gesture with an upraised wine bottle. When Montresor fails to recognise the gesture, Fortunato says "You are not of the masons" - whereupon Montresor displays a trowel he's been hiding.

Montresor repeatedly warns Fortunato who has a bad cough of the damp and suggests they go back; Fortunato however insists on continuing, claiming that "[he] shall not die of a cough." When they come to a niche, Montresor tells his victim that the Amontillado is within. Fortunato enters, and, drunk and unsuspecting, doesn't resist as Montresor quickly chains him to the wall. Montresor then declares that, since Fortunato won't go back, he must "positively leave [him]."

Montresor then remorselessly walls up the niche, entombing his friend alive. At first, Fortunato shakes the chains furiously, trying to escape; the narrator stops working for a while so he can enjoy the sound. Fortunato then screams for help, but Montresor mocks his cries, knowing nobody can hear them; later, Fortunato laughs weakly and tries to pretend it's all been a joke. As the murderer finishes the topmost row of stones, Fortunato wails despairingly "For the love of God, Montresor!" Montresor replies calmly "Yes; for the love of God!" and places the last stone.

In the last few sentences, we learn that Montresor has never been caught, and Fortunato's body still hangs from its chains in the niche where he left it so many years before. The murderer, obviously unrepentant, ends the story by quipping: In pace requiescat! (Latin: "May he rest in peace.")
Vladalf
I like Edgar Allan Poe's work. Very atmospheric and the way he shows the human fears and cruelty is very interesting. I really liked "The Masque of The Red Death", the way everything was calm inside the castle and outside there was only death.

-Vladalf
tchaunt
To me, Poe is not scary. He is just human. Have we not all had "impulses" of macabre thoughts? Think about it...Poe takes such emotions and converts them into poems and short stories that are more creative than most literature wrote today. I love all of his pieces that I have read. He makes them so realistic and so easy to get attached to. He actually inspires a lot of my art (both visual and literary) today!
crimson_aria
I think the only Poe work I know is Annabel Lee. I'm not much into poetry but I love that one. Last year, I read the mystery novel "Entombed" by Linda Farstein, which is about Edgar Allan Poe. and learned more about the man.
kutekitten
The first work by Poe that I read was Tell Tale Heart, it was a bit disturbing at the time, but had very interesting characteristics...
JessieF
I love Edgar Allan Poe's work. Very Happy He is one of my inspirations!

I have read:

The Tell-Tale Heart
The Black Cat
The Cask of Amontillado
The Raven
A Dream Within A Dream
Dreams
tchaunt
I adore Edgar Allen Poe's works to an extent that's hard for most people to understand. I think the first piece I ever read of his was The Raven. I was in fourth grade, or somewhere in that general age-group. From then on, I've read tons of his works. I love a myriad of things about his works: the style; the subjects; the typically-dark nature of his famous works; and despite the number of literary pieces, each of his works has its own individual flare that makes it a special gem in the collection.
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