FRIHOST FORUMS SEARCH FAQ TOS BLOGS COMPETITIONS
You are invited to Log in or Register a free Frihost Account!


DIY Home Renovation Project





nickfyoung
We recently bought an old house which was in a sad state of dis-repair with the intention of renovation and eventual re-sale for a profit. It had been empty for a long time with waist high grass and plenty of resident cockroaches and mice. The cockroaches and mice were the easy part with plenty of cockroach spray and mouse traps. We have lost count of how many mice we have caught and are still catching.

The outside of the house was a different story with old weather boards badly in need of paint and replace in some parts. We decided to cover the whole lot with bricks and convert the house into a brick veneer. New bricks would look funny on an old house so we opted to render and bag for a rustic finish. It was not a minor project though as first we had to dig a footing right round and pour concrete. I made some bricks for a start and then found some second hand ones. I am about half way round now and it is coming up pretty good. I will be glad when it is all finished. Then I can start to repair and paint the roof and paint inside.
Afaceinthematrix
With how much money goes into renovating a house, it is hard to do it "for profit." It helps a lot that you're doing the work yourself although check out the local regulations for working on your roof. Sometimes you need a permit. The last time I redid a roof I used the "back of the house during the week and front of the house on the weekend" because the city people that drive around don't work on the weekend and so they won't see you working on the front of the roof and during the week, even if they are driving, they won't see you working on the back of the house because you will be hidden.

Usually I follow local policies. However, charging me for a permit so that I can work on my own house (okay, not mine, but I was doing it for a friend for free so technically her house) is an invasive form of government and really just a way to use nanny-state government excuses to unjustly get money out of me.

Sometimes there are also permits/regulations for other things - such as water heaters.
nickfyoung
Afaceinthematrix wrote:
With how much money goes into renovating a house, it is hard to do it "for profit." It helps a lot that you're doing the work yourself although check out the local regulations for working on your roof. Sometimes you need a permit. The last time I redid a roof I used the "back of the house during the week and front of the house on the weekend" because the city people that drive around don't work on the weekend and so they won't see you working on the front of the roof and during the week, even if they are driving, they won't see you working on the back of the house because you will be hidden.

Usually I follow local policies. However, charging me for a permit so that I can work on my own house (okay, not mine, but I was doing it for a friend for free so technically her house) is an invasive form of government and really just a way to use nanny-state government excuses to unjustly get money out of me.

Sometimes there are also permits/regulations for other things - such as water heaters.


Same here in Australia. We are terribly over regulated. I did a bit of my own plumbing which is technically illegal. I am looking forward to moving to the Philippines one day where housing regulation is almost non existent. You need a permit from City Hall for new construction but usually a small 'fee' to the right official is all you need to get the stamp of approval.
ocalhoun
nickfyoung wrote:
We have lost count of how many mice we have caught and are still catching.


Here's my gift to you: a cheap and very effective mousetrap that can catch many mice at once, only only needs to be emptied and reset occasionally, not every time it catches a mouse:

The mice jump onto the can to get the peanut butter, but the can spins around and is too slippery to grip onto, so they fall into the liquid below... which can be just water, or it can be any manner of mouse-unfriendly liquid, if you prefer to kill them faster.
If the bucket's sides are high enough and too slippery to climb, you can leave no liquid in it at all, and make it a non-lethal trap, as long as you check it and empty it before the mice inside die of thirst.
(Of course, if you don't check a non-lethal trap often enough, it becomes a very cruel lethal trap.)
nickfyoung
ocalhoun wrote:
nickfyoung wrote:
We have lost count of how many mice we have caught and are still catching.


Here's my gift to you: a cheap and very effective mousetrap that can catch many mice at once, only only needs to be emptied and reset occasionally, not every time it catches a mouse:

The mice jump onto the can to get the peanut butter, but the can spins around and is too slippery to grip onto, so they fall into the liquid below... which can be just water, or it can be any manner of mouse-unfriendly liquid, if you prefer to kill them faster.
If the bucket's sides are high enough and too slippery to climb, you can leave no liquid in it at all, and make it a non-lethal trap, as long as you check it and empty it before the mice inside die of thirst.
(Of course, if you don't check a non-lethal trap often enough, it becomes a very cruel lethal trap.)


A good idea. I have caught them with some bait at the end of a school ruler over a bucket so that it tips up as the mouse goes out and drops them into the water. You only get one at a time though. Yours looks much better.
Related topics
Frihost DC (Distributed Computing) Project
Completed project
PROJECT SMITH: Shopping Trolley - Complete Coverage
Folding@Home - Help Find a Cure
Samur and his @home
Project Space
Seti@Home
Project Redbook-Brantonium
PS3 Folding@Home
My Landrover Project
DIY Home Improvement sites
Hurricanes or Tornadoes?
Your favorite DIY site/project?
Climate change data
Reply to topic    Frihost Forum Index -> General -> General Chat

FRIHOST HOME | FAQ | TOS | ABOUT US | CONTACT US | SITE MAP
© 2005-2011 Frihost, forums powered by phpBB.