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Islamist becomes Egypt's president





loyal
Quote:
(Reuters) - Mohamed Morsy of the Muslim Brotherhood sets about building a civilian administration for Egypt on Monday that can heal a divisive history of oppression and coax a mistrustful army into relaxing its grip on power.


Read more: http://uk.reuters.com/article/2012/06/25/uk-egypt-election-idUKBRE85L0JA20120625

Interesting result. I much prefer it, for the Egyptian people's sake, to the other candidate. It would have been messed up, if the other candidate, a minister in Mubarak's government had won.
deanhills
Sort of an enormous reversal of fortunes however. Just a couple of years ago every one was fearing the influence of the Islamic Brotherhood in Egypt. Looks as though they've hyped Mubarak up so much it's driven them right into the arms of the Islamic Brotherhood. I'm uncomfortable that the army has so much power, could easily become a loose cannon. Who does the army report to and who is checking on the army?
Josso
The brotherhood is not entirely as it seems. I've found connections between intelligence/counter-intelligence agencies. Maybe this guy isn't but 'just sayin'
Hello_World
I am very concerned. This reflects what happened in Iran. The people were fed up with the corruption and terror of the previous government and had a revolution. They thought, gee, our religious leaders will not be corrupt and will be 'good' people. Unfortunately the Islamic government they fought for is worse than the one before.
coolclay
Quote:
This reflects what happened in Iran
While it seems that way, one can only hope for things to be better.
kaysch
capricornis wrote:
He claims to be moderate

Whether he is or not, under his regime the country stumbles into chaos, and I am not sure he is to blame. When I visited Cairo in December 2012 there were a lot of peaceful demonstrations. I asked some participants about the background - what they wanted, how they would change Egypt, what could be said against the fact that they would accept their defeat in the light of Mr Mursi being the legally elected president of the country and how the constitution then to be subject of a public referendum should be changed to be acceptable.

The answers I got were pretty sobering: we don't like him, we prefer somebody else. He is not good for the country. And he managed to win the elections only because he managed to buy the votes.

Now I don't like the guy. I also don't like what he stands for. But why would the Egyptian opposition give him and his party a chance to rule the country? If that is the way to win an election in Egypt why doesn't the opposition start collecting for buying the votes and bribe those who count the votes in 4 years time, and then let's see what happens...
deanhills
kaysch wrote:
Now I don't like the guy. I also don't like what he stands for. But why would the Egyptian opposition give him and his party a chance to rule the country? If that is the way to win an election in Egypt why doesn't the opposition start collecting for buying the votes and bribe those who count the votes in 4 years time, and then let's see what happens...
I sometimes wonder whether any person who gets the job of being the democratically elected leader in Egypt, just automatically assumes he is "in charge", and should do as he wishes in order to produce what he thinks is in the best interest of the people. The fact that he has been elected proves to the leader that he knows better than any one else what to do, including the people. Therefore once the people have elected him, the people should shut up, and allow him to do his job. Going to be a tough job to break through that leadership attitude that has been around from the beginning of time. Perhaps people in Egypt are trying to reach for Western type freedom of speech and democracy, however their own culture in their homes where husbands, fathers and sons reign supreme in a dictatorial fashion is standing in their way. They will have to undergo a complete transformation of their culture and way of life in order to really get to the freedom and democracy they want for themselves. I see that only happening in future generations. The current period of "sturm und drang" may be looked back upon one day as an important revolutionary period in their history. Hopefully it will grow into something really good eventually.
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