FRIHOST FORUMS SEARCH FAQ TOS BLOGS COMPETITIONS
You are invited to Log in or Register a free Frihost Account!


Could Our Universe Produce a Real God?





shailesh123
I realize that a giant computer could be the last remnant of intelligence our universe has to offer but something like that would certainly rule out the living entity, would it not?
And also want to know about given theory

"You can create a god from nothing in theory, as long as you create an anti-god at the same time. If the two ever get together, the resulting explosion will leave nothing once more. "
Ankhanu
What are you proposing a god to be?
mazito
i remember an episode of Start Treck in TV where Kirk and the Enterprise found a civilization that have a good, "VOY" or some, and kirk at the end of the day discoverd that part of that god actualy is the one of the voyager ship.

perhaps is something about
shailesh123
I don't know of any theories or models of how a universe can create a god. So I believe it is more likely that the universe was created by God instread of the reverse.
_AVG_
I do not understand what this post is about. Please provide a definition of "god" and then we can answer your question whether the universe can create one or not.

For example. the omnipotent/omniscient/omnibenevolent creator definition of god cannot be created in our universe (or in any universe for that matter?) Rolling Eyes
Ankhanu
shailesh123 wrote:
I don't know of any theories or models of how a universe can create a god. So I believe it is more likely that the universe was created by God instread of the reverse.

I'm not sure how not expecting one leads into expecting the other... they're pretty separate concepts. It's not like state A (Universe created gods) and state B (god created universe) are binary; there's at least a possible state C (no gods) and potentially even state D (gods and universe, neither creating the other). If you don't accept state A, why immediately assume State B??
Bikerman
How can a universe create God(s)?
Easy. Create intelligent life that seeks to explain its own origin. Gods are an almost certain outcome.
ocalhoun
On a more on-topic note, I doubt that anything within a universe could know everything about the universe.

For one thing, it would therefore have to know everything about itself... including the part that knows about itself, and it would have to know about that part as well, and would have to know about the part that knows about that part... and so on, regressing infinitely.

Since I don't think it's possible to have total self-awareness, it therefore isn't possible for something contained in the universe to know everything about the universe.


(But if our entire universe were, say, a huge computer simulation being run by something outside of it, then it would be possible for something outside of the universe to know everything about it.)
Ankhanu
ocalhoun wrote:
On a more on-topic note, I doubt that anything within a universe could know everything about the universe.

For one thing, it would therefore have to know everything about itself... including the part that knows about itself, and it would have to know about that part as well, and would have to know about the part that knows about that part... and so on, regressing infinitely.

Since I don't think it's possible to have total self-awareness, it therefore isn't possible for something contained in the universe to know everything about the universe.


(But if our entire universe were, say, a huge computer simulation being run by something outside of it, then it would be possible for something outside of the universe to know everything about it.)

This is why I ask what is meant by a god. See you're using the omniscient concept of a god in your definition/reasoning, but, the vast majority of gods through culture/history have not possessed omniscience, and have had myriad limitations. With this in mind, would a universe be able to produce a god that's not omniscient?
ocalhoun
Ankhanu wrote:

This is why I ask what is meant by a god. See you're using the omniscient concept of a god in your definition/reasoning, but, the vast majority of gods through culture/history have not possessed omniscience, and have had myriad limitations. With this in mind, would a universe be able to produce a god that's not omniscient?

Okay, first define the minimum requirements to be a 'god', and then I'll tell you if our universe could produce one.
mgeek
The question is rather strange. God is not a product of the universe; no philosophy would assume that.
Ankhanu
ocalhoun wrote:
Ankhanu wrote:

This is why I ask what is meant by a god. See you're using the omniscient concept of a god in your definition/reasoning, but, the vast majority of gods through culture/history have not possessed omniscience, and have had myriad limitations. With this in mind, would a universe be able to produce a god that's not omniscient?

Okay, first define the minimum requirements to be a 'god', and then I'll tell you if our universe could produce one.

That's my question to the OP; they haven't responded Razz
Ankhanu
softonaseo15 wrote:
God is under every one. but only we have to find him which i we are not done.

So what's the evidence for your first claim, given that your second claim denies it?
andro_king
How can an universe create God ? Its just matter of human-mind !! Confused Confused
Ankhanu
andro_king wrote:
How can an universe create God ? Its just matter of human-mind !! Confused Confused

Then I suppose it's done so many times over; as the human mind (a property of the universe) has created many, many gods!
SonLight
There was a planetarium show called "The Springtime of the Universe" which had an interesting take on this, although I don't really feel it solved any of the underlying philosophical questions. Humankind developed advanced computers which handled their technology and answered people's questions. People kept asking about the end of the universe, and every generation of the computers always answered, "There is not yet sufficient time to answer that question".

Eventually the Universe became old and the last stars died out. The computer was now in some sort of hyperspace which was unaffected, and since life could no longer be supported it somehow absorbed the essence of humankind. In the long darkness which followed, the computer finally had time to compute the answer. There was now no one to give the answer to. Oh, well, "the answer by demonstration will suffice".

The final line was "Let there be light". Delivered with a sufficiently big bang, of course.
kelseymh
Please read the short story "The Last Question," by Isaac Asimov. I'm sure the planetarium you visited properly credited the source in their advertising, though perhaps not very prominently.

SonLight wrote:
There was a planetarium show called "The Springtime of the Universe" which had an interesting take on this, although I don't really feel it solved any of the underlying philosophical questions. Humankind developed advanced computers which handled their technology and answered people's questions. People kept asking about the end of the universe, and every generation of the computers always answered, "There is not yet sufficient time to answer that question".

Eventually the Universe became old and the last stars died out. The computer was now in some sort of hyperspace which was unaffected, and since life could no longer be supported it somehow absorbed the essence of humankind. In the long darkness which followed, the computer finally had time to compute the answer. There was now no one to give the answer to. Oh, well, "the answer by demonstration will suffice".

The final line was "Let there be light". Delivered with a sufficiently big bang, of course.
SonLight
Thanks for posting the source of the story. I remember it now that you mention it, although I have never read the story. I love Asimov's writing. In the show the names are based upon the Univac series. The first one was Univac, which I assume refers to the original Univac I which was probably relatively new when the story was written. After morphing the name a few times, the final one was called "Univeral AC" -- which converts back to the original meaning for the Univac brand name, "Universal Automatic Computer", ca. 1950.
killer2022
depends on your definition of, "god"
kndge9584
yes, universe produce a real god When people thank God for their accomplishments, what they don't realize is that it's not a God outside of them that did the work, it's the god that they found within themself. Everyone has it
Ankhanu
kndge9584 wrote:
yes, universe produce a real god When people thank God for their accomplishments, what they don't realize is that it's not a God outside of them that did the work, it's the god that they found within themself. Everyone has it

That seems... paradoxical.
Dennise
This is a silly thread without - as has been already stated - an acceptable and agreed definition of God.

Since an agreed definition is likely impossible, then the OP's question is moot.
Ankhanu
And since the OP was a fly by night poster, making two posts to advertise the link in their signature, and is never coming back... the topic can never be resolved Razz
Related topics
science vs. religion
Do we have Free Will or is there only Determinism?
A debate of religion, science, and more
Is God a man?
IS OUR DESTINY PLANNED BY GOD??
Ways to make hell good?
Gravity , RS models & extra dimentions
The God argument: Is there a God?
How did the universe come to be, if there is no God?
[Official] God - NO LONGER A STICKY
Death of the Author (God)
Climate change and politics
God, the Universe, and Everything...
God exists - and here's the proof
Reply to topic    Frihost Forum Index -> Science -> The Universe

FRIHOST HOME | FAQ | TOS | ABOUT US | CONTACT US | SITE MAP
© 2005-2011 Frihost, forums powered by phpBB.