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BATTERY THAT RUNS ON PAPER WASTE.





asnani04
Scientists have developed a “bio-battery” which generates energy by digesting waste paper. The eco-friendly battery created by researchers at electronic giant sony uses cellulose(a special enzyme) to produce electricity.cellulose will serve as a catalyst. In 2007 sony demonstrated a walkman working on the same principle.but now this invention may prove to be a more uselful product showcased at eco-products 2011 in Tokyo(japan).The company claims that this battery can generate electricity upto 18-wh which is enough to power a small fan.This process is some what similar to the one occurring in our digestive system. Idea
tasfee
The raw materials are from woods and that are the facts. Recently people are destroying woods to fulfill the demand of civilization. There will plus another item.
boinsterman
How MUCH paper per kilowatt? Do they expect to come out with a product that is worth the cost and amount of paper and other resources, like time spent feeding in the paper?

Generating electricity from cellulose has been a major goal of alternative energy researchers for some time. But I am surprised a major corporation has done significant research. I thought it was mostly a grass-roots effort.
bukaida
It should be taken care that in order to supply "cellulose" , the trees must not be chopped. Otherwise it will ruin the idea of "green" effort. Also it should be seen, how much will be the success for this product at commercial level.
ocalhoun
I do agree that the crucial question is, 'how much paper per wh produced?'
If each 'battery' is the size of a brick, and just as heavy, producing 18wh is not very impressive at all.

bukaida wrote:
It should be taken care that in order to supply "cellulose" , the trees must not be chopped. Otherwise it will ruin the idea of "green" effort.

If tree* farms are planted (and continually replanted) for that purpose, the system basically functions as a solar power plant, collecting energy by using the trees as cheap self-building solar panels.


*Probably would be more efficient with a different, faster growing, plant. Bamboo maybe? Kudzu?
menino
Actually instead of chopping down trees, I think it would be safe to assume that they can use recycled paper, such as old newspapers and old papers from different offices.

This is great news actually, and its great that sony has developed it.

I remember watching "Back to the future" movies, and seeing how the scientist fuels his car using disposable material, and now it has come to "light" (pun intended.

There will be major uses of it, but depending on the price. I think at the moment, it will be expensive, since its still new technology, and other companies will definitely want to get the patents of it.
bukaida
yeah, competition can reduce the price to a great extent. So let the other companies also come out with some solution.

@ ocalhoun
Usually, the rate of construction is much less than the rate of destruction(specially in third world countries). So a strict vigilance must be enforced by the corresponding government.
menino
I'm not sure about this, but I think power companies would not like this technology, since it will eat away their revenues.
There are various improvements in technology these days, that can generate electricity from wind, waves (or hydroelectricity), and the use of a dynamo to derive power from motion (like that device which generates electricity from a stationary bicycle, so that you can watch TV.)
But I haven't seen these devices as household names, especially where they would do well in poor countries; or where electricity is very expensive.

These stationary bicycles can be used in gyms as well, and can probably egenerate their own electricy........ and if there are lots of member, they probably can power up the city. Laughing
ocalhoun
menino wrote:
I'm not sure about this, but I think power companies would not like this technology, since it will eat away their revenues.

Unless they are the ones using it, building big (more efficient) industrial sized ones, and then distributing the power generated through their existing grid...
bukaida
usually these inventions are targeted towards domestic users rather than industrial users. If the domestic users can be detached, the overall power requirement will reduce.
coolclay
Trees are definitely not the only source of cellulose. My lab is actually working under a grant from the Department of Energy to find a way to economically digest cellulose from sugar cane waste and produce ethanol. So far things are showing great possibilities.

Also as a side note Back to the Future trash powered car isn't that far away. Wood gasification systems have been around for almost 150 years. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wood_gasification.

Here is a new publication detailing how to build onehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wood_gasification
menino
coolclay wrote:
Trees are definitely not the only source of cellulose. My lab is actually working under a grant from the Department of Energy to find a way to economically digest cellulose from sugar cane waste and produce ethanol. So far things are showing great possibilities.


That is great news coolclay. Good luck on that and hope it works out.
Is the sugar cane waste product called hemp?
I think hemp is the waste product of corn as well, and is supposed to be used for bio fuels as well.
menino
ocalhoun wrote:
menino wrote:
I'm not sure about this, but I think power companies would not like this technology, since it will eat away their revenues.

Unless they are the ones using it, building big (more efficient) industrial sized ones, and then distributing the power generated through their existing grid...


I hope so ocalhoun, but oil industries (which is another power generating industry), will definitely not want this, because if this could power vehicles in the future (And I'm pretty sure it might even indirectly), the oil companies would be quite perturbed about it, I would guess.
coolclay
No, it's called bagasse. Corn residuals are called sillage, and is typically fermented and fed to cattle. Bagasse is one of the few agricultural byproducts today that currently has no use and is typically just burned.

Hemp comes from only one place and that is the hemp plant Cannabis sativa. Hemp is used typically for making rope, string, or other forms of cordage. It used to be the number one source of cordage pre-synthetics, and was a huge agricultural product of the US, and many other countries. But due to the rise of synthetics hemp cordage demand has fallen exponentially.
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