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English: Word for day and night





Peterssidan
I guess you could use the word day in most situations without misunderstandings but is there a word that includes both day and night or a 24 hours time period in English?
ocalhoun
A single word? No, I don't think so...
'full day' or 'complete day' are probably the best you'll get.
...Though even those will be colored by the context you use them in.
"A full day later" Would be taken to mean 24 hours later... but,
"I worked a full day." Would probably be taken to mean you worked a full 8-hour day, or worked from dawn to sunset at most.

Though you might be also able to reword things to use a word like 'tomorrow'.
ie, instead of 'a full day later...', 'tomorrow...'.
loremar
There is. I found one:

Nychthemeron - English definitions

Wikipedia wrote:
Nychthemeron /nɪkˈθɛmərɒn/, occasionally nycthemeron or nuchthemeron (Greek νυχθήμερον from the words nycht- "night", and hemera "day, daytime") is a period of 24 consecutive hours. It is sometimes used, especially in technical literature, to avoid the ambiguity inherent in the term day.
It is the period of time that a calendar normally labels with a date.


References:
http://www.allwords.com/word-nychthemeron.html
http://wordsmith.org/words/nychthemeron.html

Other English words applicable are:
solar day, day-night, date.
Peterssidan
OK, Thank you. I guess nychthemeron is not the kind of word you normally use if you want people to understand. I was just curious because in Swedish there is a special word for it.
truespeed
Doesn't the word day include night time too? Day means a full day. As in Today,yesterday.
Peterssidan
truespeed wrote:
Doesn't the word day include night time too? Day means a full day. As in Today, yesterday.
hmm, sometimes but not always. E.g. "Animals eat during the day".
loremar
Peterssidan wrote:
OK, Thank you. I guess nychthemeron is not the kind of word you normally use if you want people to understand. I was just curious because in Swedish there is a special word for it.

And some other languages too:
Wikipedia wrote:
The word etmaal in Dutch and the word døgn in Danish and Norwegian, or dygn in Swedish, ööpäev in Estonian and the word vuorokausi in Finnish and сутки [ˈsutkʲɪ] in Russian, can mean 24 hours, or more loosely a day plus a night in no particular order. Unlike a calendar date, only the length is defined, with no particular start or end. These words are basic and essential in these languages, so unlike "nychthemeron", they are not associated with jargon.
Esperanto can use the synonyms diurno[1] and tagnokto[2] ("day-night"). In Bulgarian the word denonoshtiye ("day-night") is used.

In my country there's none. The Filipino word araw is just the equivalent of day in English.
inuyasha
Really interesting! I've been learning English for so many years but I've never noticed I was not taught such a word. Neither did I think I need it...
It seems there's no single character includes both day and night in modern Chinese, either.
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