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How to grow tomato plants?





lovescience
I am growing tomato plants. I give them water. They like sun light too. They need space to grow their leaves.
Peterssidan
I grow tomato plants too. Another houseplant had died so I putted some seeds from a tomato into the pot and now I have 4 plants growing in there. They are not very big and will probably never have fruits but it's fun to see how they grow and how long they will survive.
Bluedoll
There are several "breeds" of plants. Some are suited for indoor growth more than others. Dwarf varieties do not grow as tall but still produce tomatoes. It is good to stake them early on so as not to disturb the roots. Drive in good solid stick or have something the plant can be tied to without being disturbed. Grow until plant has flowers then trim off ‘suckers’ for better tomatoes.
lovescience
Peterssidan wrote:
I putted some seeds from a tomato into the pot and now I have 4 plants growing in there. They are not very big.


If they are still small. It is good if you can put them into different pot. So each of them can grow their leaves and becomes bigger.

It is better if you do that when they are still little. They would grow fast after they have plenty of soil just for one tomato plant.

I found they grow very long roots so the deeper the soil you have the better.
lovescience
I found this video about how to prune a tomato plant.

http://www.ehow.com/video_2328947_prune-tomato-plant.html

He trims almost all the leaves off the tomato plant after the plant flowered, so the plant will have all the nutrient for the tomatoes on the plant, and saves all the flowers which will produce more tomatoes.
ocalhoun
lovescience wrote:

He trims almost all the leaves off the tomato plant after the plant flowered, so the plant will have all the nutrient for the tomatoes on the plant, and saves all the flowers which will produce more tomatoes.

Isn't that kinda backwards?

That way, you'll have a whole lot of tomatoes growing, and no leaves to provide the energy to grow them.

It might turn out better if you save all (or most) of the leaves, and trim off the extra flowers, leaving more resources to grow fewer tomatoes...
This will result in fewer harvested tomatoes, but should improve the quality of them.

Trimming the leaves and leaving the flowers would result in many low-quality tomatoes... if it didn't completely kill the plant. (No plant is going to grow well if you continually cut all it's leaves off.)
Ankhanu
ocalhoun wrote:
Trimming the leaves and leaving the flowers would result in many low-quality tomatoes... if it didn't completely kill the plant. (No plant is going to grow well if you continually cut all it's leaves off.)


It'll kill it. You won't end up with any ripe tomatoes, but you will end up with compostable stalks and immature fruit. I wouldn't expect the leafless plant to last more than a week.
Peterssidan
Instead of cutting off all the leaves isn't it more common to just cut off the top of the branches so that it spends less time on growing big and more energy on what it already have?
Ankhanu
Peterssidan wrote:
Instead of cutting off all the leaves isn't it more common to just cut off the top of the branches so that it spends less time on growing big and more energy on what it already have?

Yup, remove meristem and it won't grow taller; combine with removing extra flowers and more energy is allocated to developing the current tomatoes.
lovescience
Found another video:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=iNz9lHqJx7Q

Probably it's also better to prune just one third of side branches for the plants to grow better fruits.
donoob88
i don't know how to plant tomatoes, but i think that it is a transferable plant, meaning that it should be planted first in a small pot with little soil, damp with water, wait until it grows roots and leaves, then transfer it in larger pot, or in the land, hmm, maybe if we google about the real tutorial of this then you will have a better answer Very Happy Wink
Iceaxe0410
The main problem I've had with growing tomatoes are the insects that eat the fruit and leaves. It's been a common theme to go out at night just to take off all the snails and in the day time look for any other culprits.

Using pesticides is not an option since I'd much rather not die from eating chemicals. There are some natural pesticides that seemed to help like orange oil. I have since planted other plants near the tomatoes that are supposed to increase beneficial insects to ward off the bad ones. Also have tried soaps, but that seems to not be as effective. It's always the insects that you don't see that cause the most damage.
ocalhoun
Iceaxe0410 wrote:

Using pesticides is not an option since I'd much rather not die from eating chemicals.

You won't die from eating plants that have been treated with pesticides -- AS LONG AS YOU WASH THEM WELL.
Wash the produce well, and you'll remove the pesticide residue, making it safe to eat.

That said, using the 'natural' pesticides is better if you find one that works for the varieties of pests you deal with.
orangbaik
lovescience wrote:
I am growing tomato plants. I give them water. They like sun light too. They need space to grow their leaves.


how many tomato do you have
setfirework
I find the best way to grow tomatoes in my unheated greenhouse is to raise them from seed sown in sterilised compost in disposable plastic "drinkups" transplanting them (plant+compost)into 4"pots when the young plant has grown to around 4" tall and a good root ball has formed. The plants are then grown on until 12" high when they are then transplanted (plant+compost) into bottomless 5 litre plastic pots which sit on circular holes cut in the top of grow-bags. The growbag compost is scooped out first where each hole has been cut for the bottomless pots (2 per growbag) and the young tomato plant put into the empty 5litre pot with its root ball on the bottom of the grow bag. The pot is then filled up with a mixture of sterilised soil and the growbag compost that was removed to which a dessert spoonful of ground rock phosphate has been added and well mixed in. This encourages the plant to develop more roots higher up its stalk and it is having a good root system that will give the plant good strength and growth.
As the plant grows taller keep removing all the lower leaves except the top 4. This allows the plant's strength to develop its FRUIT not its leaves, and also allows more light in to help fruit ripen and provide good air circulation round the plant to prevent any moulds forming.
lovescience
some tomato plants are fruiting,

have some leaves having leaf-miners,

so I trim the leaves off and prune the tomato plants.
Peterssidan
One of the plants I mentioned earlier in this thread still lives. I should have planted it outside or in a bigger pot but it never happened. I had to cut it down once because it got very unstable and so it's not very tall now. Do you think it can survive one more year and have fruits next year?
lovescience
Peterssidan wrote:
One of the plants I mentioned earlier in this thread still lives. I should have planted it outside or in a bigger pot but it never happened. I had to cut it down once because it got very unstable and so it's not very tall now. Do you think it can survive one more year and have fruits next year?



Your tomato plant probably is an indeterminate tomato plant.

An indeterminate tomato plant can grow tall and you can prune it.

An indeterminate tomato plant would keep growing until it can't. Your tomato plant probably had been protected from frost.


I found these two pages about the question.

http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/tomato/msg0120051020361.html

http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/tomato/msg0401570529966.html

Smile
sysna
i have a tomato plant too in front of my house, haven't ever had a chance to taste its tomatoes because it doesn't give one ! i don't know what is wrong with it but there is no tomatoes. does they need more than 1 year to give tomatoes ?
Peterssidan
sysna wrote:
i have a tomato plant too in front of my house, haven't ever had a chance to taste its tomatoes because it doesn't give one ! i don't know what is wrong with it but there is no tomatoes. does they need more than 1 year to give tomatoes ?
Here tomatoes never live more than one year because they don't survive the winter but I'm not sure if other varieties takes more time. Make sure it has plenty of sunlight and water.
lovescience
Maybe the tomato plant puts its growing on leaves instead of growing fruits.

It could be the tomato plant has too much nitrogen, which encourages the leaf growth on the tomato plant and discourages the fruit growth of the tomato plant.
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