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Anything about honey bees





lovescience
Honey bees collect water too! In hot days, they collect water to cool their hive.

Make a pond that is close to the hive for the bees. And have some plants growing on the water of the pond which can purify it for the bees to drink.

They also use water to feed baby bees!

http://www.glenn-apiaries.com/bee_photos_10.html
deanhills
I was unaware of that. Interesting factoid. Smile
Mistyqee
Wow, I never knew that. Smile
pruebasftpph
Interestig
newhorizon
That is really good to know. I live close to a pond and there are always hives of bees around. the bad thing for me is that I'm alergic to it.
-Logan
quex
Going to Asia? You might see one of these: Japanese Giant Hornet

It's not a "bee" per se, but I'm not done yet!

These guys raid honeybee nests for food, killing the smaller honey bees by the thousands. At least, they do that to foreign honey bees who have been introduced to produce honey for the commercial market. Not so to the native Japanese honey bees, however. The native bees will swarm the giant hornet scout and vibrate en masse until they have created enough heat to kill the hornet. The hornet dies at a very precise temperature, only a few degrees beneath what the honey bees can withstand... but that's all the difference they need.

These things are so big and shiny with such bright colors, when they are holding still, dozens of children in Japan every year mistake them for detailed little plastic toys (of which there are many produced in Japan, so it's not that much of a stretch to imagine finding one outside) and get stung. They CAN kill you... especially if you are a petite Japanese child.
mochipie
Eeek those Japanese giant hornets sound pretty scary. >__<

A bee once followed me (well, it certainly seemed like it to me) when I was hiking up a mountain in China... pretty much ran up the mountain for the next 5 minutes. (Yeah I'm that scared of bees. Probably because I've never been stung by one. Yet.)

A beehive used to exist behind the lamp in front of my doorway ^_^;... although I'm fine with bees out in nature, I probably would never have made a pond near my doorway, or else I'd have to speed-unlock my front door and die of fear everytime I wanted to enter my house for all of eternity...
quex
mochipie wrote:
A bee once followed me (well, it certainly seemed like it to me) when I was hiking up a mountain in China... pretty much ran up the mountain for the next 5 minutes. .


This could be a case of a thirsty bee. They (butterflies, too) like the minerals, salt and water that they can extract from mammalian sweat. Another thing could be that, if you were really running and the bee was small, he was using you as a windbreak to reduce air resistance around himself as he flew up the mountain. I would never have believed animals did this until, one year driving along the coast of northern California in a van, a seagull flew right up behind the van and drafted behind us all the way up a long hill.

Trick I learned about butterflies from a photographer friend: if you pee on the ground in an area highly populated with butterflies, they will gather at the spot to drink and collect minerals. They also become relatively slow and tame after drinking for a few minutes, so if you are veeeerrrry gentle about it, you can coax them onto your hand or a steady leaf to get a good, close shot.

Guess that trick'll be easier for you gentlemen to perform. Embarassed
deanhills
quex wrote:
Trick I learned about butterflies from a photographer friend: if you pee on the ground in an area highly populated with butterflies, they will gather at the spot to drink and collect minerals. They also become relatively slow and tame after drinking for a few minutes, so if you are veeeerrrry gentle about it, you can coax them onto your hand or a steady leaf to get a good, close shot.

Guess that trick'll be easier for you gentlemen to perform. Embarassed
Haha .... great idea. Never realized butterflies were in search of minerals. What's good for them I guess should be good for humans too .... Twisted Evil
portoskt
i can give you any information about honey beens you want, my sister husband have it a lot, and doing that for life... very interesting job, i think
365427417
Good article, come along with you to learn next.
bluepig83
Btw, since we're on the topic of honey bees. What's your take on whether the honey bee population is actually diminishing at a rapid pace? And does that really mean the end of the world? Aren't there other pollinators besides bees?
fuzzkaizer
well, seems worth mentioning that hornets aren't bees at all. just the fact that they can sting doesn't make them bees... for someone who can't tell a bee from a hornet, certainly all stories about the birds and the bees (or just a closer look to their habits) might be a glance into a vast new (micro-)cosmos...

well yes, they need water, too... beekeepers use to throw little planks of wood into the water nearby, so that they swim and soak with water and give the bees a comfortable place to take water, and lots of bees will come and sit there on a hot day like this ...
ghanster
deanhills wrote:
I was unaware of that. Interesting factoid. Smile


Not only are you! I'm also surprised to hear this... Its like naturally they are intelligent
fuzzkaizer
Anyone heard that the honeybees are endangered by a parasitic little animal called "Varroa"?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Varroa
Beekeepers have to give the beehives a special treat against the Varroa-mite, and so they manage to decimate the mites, but not to extinguish them. There always stay some of them in the beehive, and the bees cant't get rid of that disease...
milkshake01
Thanks for the fact.
zaxacongrejo
hey "Varroa" is very old problem its a parasit it start to show up in europe at end of the 80s and the explosion it was at 90s now you have an even worst problem called collapse of colonies imagine you are honeybees breeder and from the day to the night thousands of honeybees desapear and never return again this is happening a lot now there are a couple o theories on the subject some say its due to chimicals plastic ogns etc the fact is that if honeybees for some reason get extint we go next
bluepig83
That is interesting. Another thing about honey bees, apparently, is that they are starting to disappear. I think I've read some articles on it, but that thought just seems so crazy like it comes from a sci-fi movie. Apparently, since honey bees are vital for the pollenizing flowers, there are repercussions if all the honey bees die out, besides that we wouldn't have any more honey. It's almost like a doomsday scenario.
rjraaz
Very interesting fact, as like others I was also not aware of this fact yet.
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