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Do you go to record stores?





lovescience
Do you go to record stores?

Which record stores you go to?
deanhills
lovescience wrote:
Do you go to record stores?

Which record stores you go to?
There is only one really good chain to go to, and it is not really that good by Virgin Stores standards, Virgin Stores. They are not all equal in standards either. The best one in my experience is in City Centre, Dubai.
Blummer
I do. Though I've some digital music on my laptop/ipod, I'll always enjoy holding a physical record.
chartcentral
I still do go to record stores. From the place I'm at, there's Astroplus/Astrovision, Odyssey and SM Record Bar.
Dialogist
My record store is surprisingly cheap and within walking distance. The journey goes like this: Computer on > google > rapidshare > blast through 2 or 3 lackluster tracks > straight in the recycle bin. Empty. You know that noise it makes when it empties? Like Crrrrckkk, like paper crumpling? That's the official soundtrack of Disgust. So when people say piracy is wrong, I say chance would be a fine thing because nobody has made a decent record since 1969. So Bono and his ilk, please, stop crying about downloading music ruining the music industry. The music industry ruined music. You literally cannot give that away. Go do an ipod or pepsi commerical or something. Make yourself useful. And for future reference: It's always a good idea to make something worth stealing before you ask for money for it.

The thing now (somebody mentioned the physical item above me) is that this new SOPA (Stop Online Piracy Act) is being slowly implemented worldwide effectively pressuring the broadband providers to censor the internet from people paying them for use of it (I won't get on my SOPAbox, don't worry) but I think it's interesting (perverse) that these people think that removing music, film and media's only local and international promotional publicity outlet is going to help sales. Nobody purchases what they can't sample first, from pants to cars. The physical item is dead. So enjoy your record stores before they become McDonalds outlets. Full of fat people downloading stuff on handheld devices.

Last time I was in a record store, there was a computer in the center isle to search the store's database nationally to see if your record was available to order. That was quite amusing.
deanhills
Dialogist wrote:
Last time I was in a record store, there was a computer in the center isle to search the store's database nationally to see if your record was available to order. That was quite amusing.
I agree with most of what you say. My You Tube experience is much more satisfying than my Record Store any time of the day. I always find what I'm looking for immediately. When I went to the Record Store (a very large chain store - Virgin Records in City Centre Dubai) three days ago, I was hoping to find some CDs of Malmsteen. I first tried to figure out the isle where I would find Ingwe Malmsteen's music. Then could not find it. Then went to an attendant (had to look for one) who had a question mark on her face when I asked about Malmsteen. Even after I had given her the spelling etc. She asked me to type it into her computer. After all of that there was just one very old CD available. I don't buy from Record Stores often, but think I've learned to use this one more like for pot luck. See if there is something new around. Rather than a place I visit regularly. No wonder Virgin has been expanding in other areas like computers, music equipment etc. Since the first time when I went to that record store a few years ago to date, the actual record isles have shrunk by almost half.
Hexes
I visit the store called Empik. I am not sure if it is international company but it is really popular here in Poland. It is quite expensibe but if I am buying a gift for someone than I do it there. It is not only record store you could buy there books and movies so it is really great place to visit before christmas Wink
Ankhanu
I rarely go to record stores these days.
For one, locally, there really aren't any. All the chains closed a couple years ago, and there's only one local shop left (a second hand shop with crap selection).
Two, record store chains are garbage. I went to an HMV for the first time in years on Wednesday... first the store had collapsed from two floors to one (the smaller one), and the music selection, which used to span a floor and a half was now a single aisle. The music store is now a DVD and video game store. Depressing.
Three, I almost exclusively buy direct from artists, or second hand. I haven't been much support to the "music industry" throughout my music buying career. I have somewhere around 500 CDs, maybe 10% were bought through a venue that contributed to music industry profits (industry here being the machine, not the artists that are creating). Buying direct from the creators means they pocket all the profits, and buying second hand, only the local store is profiting.

Living in a city without any real local shops, nor chain shops, I rarely have opportunity to browse record stores any more.


I can't say that you're correct that physical media is dead, Dialogist, I think it's a fairly myopic stance. Yes, for many consumers, they're after digital "try it, buy it" style purchasing (or piracy), but there is a thriving physical media scene as well... especially in vinyl. CDs might not be as strong as they had been, but vinyl, and even tapes, are thriving. Many small labels offer vinyl options, and they sell well. Given that the larger format also allows for better liners, cover art, etc., they're offering a product that doesn't translate well to a digital only format... and people are buying.
Dialogist wrote:
Last time I was in a record store, there was a computer in the center isle to search the store's database nationally to see if your record was available to order. That was quite amusing.

Maybe I'm thick, but I don't see what's amusing about a networked product database... is it just because it's a computer and computers can be used to pirate music?


Dean: I'm not surprised you had difficulty finding Malmsteen CDs; while well known within guitar player circles, he's never been "popular", let alone in today's markets. Your best bet is probably eBay.
deanhills
Ankhanu wrote:
Dean: I'm not surprised you had difficulty finding Malmsteen CDs; while well known within guitar player circles, he's never been "popular", let alone in today's markets. Your best bet is probably eBay.
Depends where you are. Go to Sweden or most of the European countries and it may be a different kettle of fish. He is immensely popular in Japan. Type his name into YouTube Search and there is a flood of hits. Check out a YouTube search on "Malmsteen" below:
http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=malmsteen&oq=malmsteen&aq=f&aqi=g10&aql=&gs_sm=e&gs_upl=25l1628l0l11437l9l9l0l3l3l1l417l1357l1.2.1.1.1l6l0

The first result, Arpeggios from Hell, has 10 million views. The second, Blue, has 4 million views. Etc etc.

Google is also in the millions.
Ankhanu
You're confusing views with popular commercial success. He's known, he's not popular (in terms of sales). I've been playing guitar, reading guitar magazines, a member of online guitar-centric communities and real-world communities, and otherwise been engaged in music culture for 20 or so years... I have some understanding of his popularity Wink

He's no, for example, Eddie Van Halen. Similar styles in some ways, but vastly different levels of commercial success.
mathiaus
I've only ever owned about 5 CDs and they were all purchased for me as gifts. When I've looked at music it's always been in say a supermarket or at best a film/music shop like HMV. I've never actually been to a proper music store where all they sell is music and you can buy what isn't in the top 100. I'm not indie enough Razz

All my music is digital. For the last 10 years I've exclusively bought online and most recently that has been just iTunes. When I can't purchase from iTunes I'll buy MP3s from other sources online.
Ankhanu
mathiaus wrote:
All my music is digital. For the last 10 years I've exclusively bought online and most recently that has been just iTunes. When I can't purchase from iTunes I'll buy MP3s from other sources online.


All mine is digital too (ignoring the fact that CDs are a digital medium Wink ). That said, I've never bought digital-only; I refuse to buy from things like iTunes and the like.
I have bought digital files AND a physical CD from sites like zunior.com (digital files are included with the CD purchase... rather, CD purchase bumps the price of the digital files a little and you get the disc), but, every bit of music I buy has a physical counterpart.

I haven't listened to CDs much in the past decade, though... everything I own I rip to my computer and listen to in mp3 format. Once it's ripped, the disc goes to purgatory in my CD rack Razz I have had to go back to my physical discs on a couple occasions to re-rip them, following file corruptions, a HDD crash, to encode at a higher bitrate as drive storage has increased and I could afford higher quality files and the like... so it's been great having the actual CDs handy.

Purgatory:
Afaceinthematrix
If I know specifically what album I want, then I will go online to the record label's website or the band's website and order it directly because it is easier that way. I might pay a little for shipping but I save gas by not driving to five different stores to find the album.

But if I just want to browse then I will go to the store. There is actually one next to my school that I can walk to (which I enjoy because I hate wasting gas and try to get everywhere I can without a vehicle).

This summer I was in Portland, Or and they had an awesome public transportation system. We don't have one like that in Southern California and so I was having fun by just riding the train around all day (which was free in the downtown slot and cheap outside of the downtown). I would get out at random stops and walk around checking things out. I remember I got out on a rather bad part of town and was walking around (cautiously). I came across a record store and I went in. They had actual records all over the place. They had t-shirts hanging up, posters, etc. The atmosphere was amazing. I went to their metal section but they had mostly records (which are useless to me; I need CDs). The lady that works there asked if I needed help and I said that I wanted metal. She asked what band I was looking for and I said I mostly wanted to browse. So she went behind the counter to the hundreds of boxes and said, "I have 36 boxes of metal; I'll start you off with the first three. They're in alphabetical order." So I browse the first few boxes and make some selections. I then ask for boxes in the 30's because I'm looking now for Vader. She finds the boxes with the V's. When I go to buy the albums she gets out two sheets of paper. She rights the CDs I purchased on one sheet (for her inventory so that she knows what she needs to stock up on) and then hand rights me my receipt on the other.

It was definitely an atmospheric experience and I'd go back to that store and purchase more if I am ever back in Portland, Oregon.
standready
Sadly, there are no more record shops in my area. Digital downloads and big box stores closed them down. I remember one we had was similar to what Afaceinthematrix describes above and I really enjoyed looking at the posters and t-shirts while searching for an 'album'.
Radar
I will browse through CDs when I find them in a shop. Often they end up being cheaper than iTunes.
LegendVPN
I don't go to record stores. I just switch on to Youtube or MTV for new music.
deanhills
LegendVPN wrote:
I don't go to record stores. I just switch on to Youtube or MTV for new music.
I'm into YouTube a lot. Should get back to my CDs. I bought some new CDs a few weeks ago and have not opened them at all.
Blummer
Listening music on YouTube in my view is not right, maybe it's ok only when it comes to hi-res audio.
gverutes
There are hardly any left...Tower Records, Borders and other have closed in my area. Also, most "mom and pop" record stores have close too. Really sad!
Helios
No. Stores usually don't have the stuff I listen to and I don't care about the physical media.
There's always the option of buying music and films online. It's cheap, you don't have to go anywhere, it comes in good quality and since you will run out of room space before you run out of hard-disk memory it's much more hassle free (for me).
Those who are into album art can always get it as an image and display it on your screen. Smile
Laro696
Really hard to get a hold of music here in South Africa that isn't mainstream. So I have to order all my music from overseas Sad
catscratches
I don't listen to many mainstream artists and the ones I listen to, I already have all the albums I want from. Hence, I only buy online.
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